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Naicidrac
07-05-2006, 12:31 PM
Hello everyone,
this is kind of a strange post in that I am trying to find something that I read a long time ago (I think). I have a few books of various artist that I admire. One is Harley Brown's "Eternal Truths". I am pretty sure that I remember reading something about colors next to shadows in that book. I am pretty sure that Harley said in that book that a color is most satruated right as it turns into shadow. Sort of like a midtone, not a highlight or dark, but just most saturated. I was wondering if anyone knew where this was in the book or if this is true. I have been reading through that book for the last two days and I cannot find that passage in the book. I know this is a strange post, but I was wondering if this was a true law or if I just made it up. I am not even sure if I read this rule in his book or not. Also if anyone knew where this was in the book I would appreciate knowing where to find it.

Thaks again,

AnnieA
07-05-2006, 12:39 PM
I'm pretty new myself, so you shouldn't perhaps rely on what I say, but wait for a long-time member to post, but I believe I read a similar thing in a book on portraiture, Creating Beautiful Skintones in Color and Light, by Chris Saper. It may not be a hard-and-fast rule though. I'm finding that different artists have different ways of seeing things.

Naicidrac
07-05-2006, 12:47 PM
Thanks AnnieA, I have not read that book yet, but thanks for the tip.

HarveyDunn
07-05-2006, 01:31 PM
On page 26 it says:

"As a shadow goes from light to dark, the soft transitional edge is called the "core". The core is the one place where the color and value of the object appear their truest, becasue in the midst of that turn, the color and value of the surface are neither obscured by shadow nor bleached out by light...for that reason, the core is where many artists will hit their color most strongly."

But that passage is poorly written: what he means to say is as a SURFACE goes from light to dark there is a transistional area; right before the shadow starts is where the color and value of the surface are truest because they are neither obscured by shadow nor bleached out by light.

He restates his point better a few lines later: "Hardly an artist in history, painting a nice pink cheek, would miss the opportunity to make it pinkest just where it goes into shadow".


Harley Brown's Eternal Truths for Every Artist.

Naicidrac
07-05-2006, 01:52 PM
Thank you Harvey Dunn. That is exactly what I was looking for. I have been reading in the shadow and color section without any luck. I have been scanning page by page and I have not been able to find it until now. Thanks again Harvey for the info and for the clarification.

Naicidrac
07-05-2006, 02:13 PM
Thanks again for the info. I got the book out and could not find that passage on on page 26, but I did find it on page 63. Thanks again for the help.

Bringer
07-05-2006, 06:32 PM
Hi Naicidrac,

What do you want to know is how colours behave while in the shadow ?
And depending if it's on core shadow (object's shadowed part) or on the casted shadow ?
And how the colour of the object reflects on the adjacent surfaces ?
And how the light may bounce on a table and reflect itself on the shadowed part of the object ?
And how the casted shadow and the colours of the surface will change according to the distance from the object ?
Am I being too messy ? :-)
Let me see if I can find a link and I'll post here again.
It may not be really what you want but it may help a bit.

Kind regards,

José

Bringer
07-05-2006, 06:39 PM
Hi again,

Ok, I found something for you :

http://painting.about.com/od/colourtheory/a/shadows_Impress.htm

http://painting.about.com/cs/paintingknowhow/a/shadows.htm

http://painting.about.com/library/weekly/aalightdirectiona.htm

Kind regards,

José

Donna A
07-06-2006, 08:02 PM
Hello everyone,
this is kind of a strange post in that I am trying to find something that I read a long time ago (I think). I have a few books of various artist that I admire. One is Harley Brown's "Eternal Truths". I am pretty sure that I remember reading something about colors next to shadows in that book. I am pretty sure that Harley said in that book that a color is most satruated right as it turns into shadow. Sort of like a midtone, not a highlight or dark, but just most saturated. I was wondering if anyone knew where this was in the book or if this is true. I have been reading through that book for the last two days and I cannot find that passage in the book. I know this is a strange post, but I was wondering if this was a true law or if I just made it up. I am not even sure if I read this rule in his book or not. Also if anyone knew where this was in the book I would appreciate knowing where to find it.

Thaks again,

Hi, Naicidrac! Here is something that might also be a good illustration with text in addition to Harley Brown's to help you understand this color issue more.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2006/77048-Figure_by_the_Lake-Aldridge-detail.jpg

Here is the text which is included with the image in Vol. 1 of the AE Mastering Color DVD series' Annotated Gallery "Seeing the Light."

Figure by the Lake by Donna Aldridge

Often, knowing what possibilities might exist — knowing what to look for — can help us see it more easily. Having an idea of what effects light can create can lead us to setting up more exciting subject matter. This 5' high painting from life used two spot lights. To the left side was a 200 watt incandescent light that gave a warm, bright quality. To the right was a photographer's 500 watt bulb with a blue cast. You can see the effect of the latter, more powerful light nearly washing out all the flesh tones along the main plane of the back. Most interesting are the darker blues and oranges that scroll down the figure where the back and side planes meet. As the planes turn, the light no longer hits the surface fairly straight on, but rather begins to hit at a tangent, skid across the edge, not letting it easily reflect back a full quantity of light, but still coloring the area. Therefore, those edges which begin to turn "the corner" appear darker, with the respective colors of the light sources coming through as comparatively rich color. Because they are complimentary colors, they each enhance the other, adding to the sense of increased intensity of both the blue and orange.*

The full painting is viewable: http://www.aldridgestudios.com/300-TempPortraitGallery.html

This was painted in my studio, so the "lake and foliage" behind was invented to compliment the figure IRL.

Planes are sooo important to understand in our subject as well as the color of the light source(s) and their interactions. This is what creates the color effects!

I'll upload a pdf file about the color of light. Becoming more aware of the color of light source(s) can help us greatly! I would NEVER begin a painting without first becoming aware of my lighting source(s) and taking that into account as a wonderful "partner" in mixing and otherwise working with my colors, color scheme and concept for the painting, etc!!! Very best wishes! Donna ;-}