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View Full Version : ? Drawing in Ink with a chinese brush ?


Petdevils
06-14-2006, 06:04 AM
Howdy!

Wondering if anyone here can offer advice as to the best way to draw (eg life drawing) on an easel with ink and a brush (no pencil etc). I'm trying holding the brush like a pencil but way near the end and its sorta working.... i'm finding it really hard to keep my hand still so i can draw a simple straight line or curve in a thin weight - but its ohhh so hard? If of you have digital cameras a photo would really help too? thanks

petdevils

celticrichard
06-14-2006, 03:01 PM
really,ink is supposed to be on an horizontal support and chinese brushes are supposed,for details to be holden very near the hairy zone and make sure they are pointy to make thin lines.i do chinese art sometimes so i know a bity how to handle them

Stewartk
06-14-2006, 07:21 PM
HI ..... using these brushes requires a bit of practise. Normally, when doing calligraphy, one holds the brush between the thumb and the 1st 2 fingers near the upper part of the brush, that is, fatrthest away from the bristles. It is the control in the arm and wrist that you become proficient with being able to make stright lines etc.
The paper is laying flat on a table ot work surface. By applying diff. amounts of pressure you are able to vary the width of the line being drawn. These are just the traditional ways of doing things as I was taught.

When doing sumi painting, tradtional teaching keeps the brush in much the same manner, however, there are others that hold the brush in the most comfortable position. I have found that in order for me to get the brush strokes needed to create a stalk of bamboo, there is no other way than the tradtional way of holding the brush to achive this. Whether this is due to years of practise holding this way or not , i can not say but control is key and I have the most control in this way.

Dont get frustrated if you cant do a stright line right away, I cant tell you how muck ink and paper I have gone through to just get a stright line. That in fact is one basic practise stroke you learn very early on.

It just come down to practise and time. Hope this helped a bit! :)

Just keep practising and grinding ink (if you are grinding ink)
stew

Stewartk
06-14-2006, 07:23 PM
Quick note:

In re-reading your post i ssumed that you were speaking of the larger sumi brushes used for calligraphy and Sumi painting .. if not then please disregard my post :)
stew