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Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:22 PM
Drawing 102: Class 3


Sketching for Real


“You can't do sketches enough. Sketch everything and keep your curiosity fresh.”
John Singer Sargent


"It is only by drawing often, drawing everything, drawing incessantly, that one fine day you discover to your surprise that you have rendered something in its true character."

Camille Pissarro


“It’s amazing how loose some people become in their sketchbook drawing simply because they have a carefree approach and don’t become locked down in trying to make finished works”
Robert Wade


Introduction

This is an intermediate level class aimed at developing your existing drawing knowledge and skills with a view to sketching – outside, in public without any photographs or visual aids. Well maybe the odd one or two – but there are definitely no reference photographs in this class!

At the end of this class you will understand better how to apply your existing knowledge to help you to:
Draw more quickly so you can sketch within time constraints
Sketch outside
Sketch in publicThis class will not teach you to draw. The class instruction assumes that people have existing drawing skills acquired through study elsewhere or through following at least some of the previous drawing lessons in the Drawing 101 and Drawing 102 series.

This class formally lasts from 5th-18th June 2006 but will continue to be supported by the Drawing and Sketching Forum after that.

There is a lot to read – please take your time.

So why should I do this class?

Drawing from life, sketching outside and sketching in public – maybe you’ve never done at least one of those things before? Why not?
You don’t ‘sketch’ or at least you don’t think you do; you’re maybe not even very sure what sketching is (see ‘What is a Sketch’).
Maybe you don’t draw very quickly. You just KNOW you’d never be able to get finished in time – whatever that is.
Maybe you’re a bit afraid. They have people in public places!
They’d ask you to do their portraits.
They might creep up behind you / look over your shoulder and give you a fright.
Or maybe the dreaded “critique critters” will be out in force saying really rude things about your drawing (because you’re drawing what’s in front of you and don’t have a reference photograph).
Or maybe you had a not so happy experience – once, a long time ago – and you’re scared of starting again.
All in all it’s just too nerve-wracking! You lack confidence - and that’s why you’ve never had a go.A recent poll (http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2006/05/do-you-ever-sketch-in-public.html) of nearly 600 artists and would-be artists suggests that only 2% of people have actually had a bad experience which stopped them sketching in public – and a further 60% already sketch in public. A similar poll of WC members “Do You Ever Sketch in Public?” (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=349659) indicates that the majority do. Maybe that might make you think again?

This class can only be a jumping off point. Becoming good at sketching takes practice – and then more practice. However, this class will help you to address many typical concerns and you will start to learn how to:
sketch objects or scenes within a time constraint
sketch outside, from life (without photographs) and in public. Imagine there is a way to draw everyday. You know you should be doing this as you know how much it is reputed to improve your drawing skills.

But there’s a problem - you know you just don’t have the time, not with all your other commitments.

Imagine now that you can learn to draw more quickly so that even 5 minutes or 10 minutes out of the day can be used to sketch something new – imagine how much you might gain from this.

Imagine you’re on a holiday. You’d like to be able to sketch what you see. People tell you that if you do you will always have a much better memory of the scene, a much better record of the true colours and values than any photo can provide and that any painting you do will be improved by having done a preliminary study from life.

But there’s a problem. You know you’re quite accomplished at drawing –because everybody back in the Drawing and Sketching Forum at WC is very complimentary about your drawings. However, you know how long they take – and you only know how to draw from photographs.

So – do you want to tackle these problems? Are you ready to have a go at sketching?
Assignment 1 will help you with capturing things quickly.
If you want to sketch in public then assignments 2 and 3 will help you to do this.And what’s more, before you know it, you’ll be having such a good time you’ll wonder why you never did this before; you’ll have started your daily sketching blog, be making lots of new friends and going on sketchcrawls! ;)

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:24 PM
What is a “sketch”?

A sketch, in art terms can be
a way of practising and refining your skills in drawing and mark marking
an exploratory drawing – exploring how something works/might work
a quick drawing – e.g. sketching in public tends to be time-limited rather than open-ended
a rough description – it’s OK if they lack detail; don’t fill the page or are not even completed
a record of something you’ve seen
a record of one or more aspects of something you want to develop into a painting e.g. a colour study
a preliminary study – for a later painting (done before you start to check how your painting will work rather than as an underdrawing on your final support)A sketch may be an imaginative or a creative interpretation of reference material – but it does not involve meticulous copying of a reference photo.

Very often a sketch is a study of a subject that the artist can see – and consequently involves working and drawing from life. This is the sort of sketch we will focus on in this lesson.

Why sketch?

Sketching broadens and enhances your basic skill base. As you practice and progress, sketching will also help you to:
Develop your freehand drawing, mark making and observational skills
Draw something everyday – an exercise which will bring fluency and confidence to your drawing
Get a better record of the colours and tones you see
Practice how to crop a scene and compose a picture
Develop finished artwork without relying totally on a reference photoPeople who sketch gain value from the following activities:
Practicing freehand drawing skills – tracing reference images and using grids can mean that some artists lose their fluency in freehand drawing skills or fail to develop them at all. Sketching improves freehand drawing. With practice comes fluency and the ability to draw more quickly and make more creative and interesting marks.
Drawing with minimal aids – when the only drawings aids you have are your pencils and maybe a viewfinder, you soon learn to develop your observational skills. Looking more carefully means you get better at measuring judging by eye alone. You also understand much better ‘how’ a view works – you understand the architectural perspective (http://studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/draw.html), the aerial perspective (http://studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/ap-aerial.html) and grasp the recession which often gets flattened in a photograph.
Ability to see values and colours – unless you are an expert photographer, once you start to sketch and compare your sketch with photos you took at the same time, you will learn very quickly just how poor photographs are at capturing the true range of tonal values that you have seen. In addition, because you learn to look more carefully at colours, you will also begin to understand how most photographs can distort both contrast and colour, particularly on very bright days. Take photographs to record details and check drawing and sketch to get values and colours correct.
Ability to see ‘pictures’ - Once you start to sketch and practice looking at your environment more, you will start to “see pictures” everywhere you go. :D For many people this marks the point when they know they are beginning to think like an artist. You’ll find you will start using your very own fingers and thumbs to construct a viewfinder to check out potential images to sketch. (Do try to avoid driving the car at the same time!) You will soon find yourself wanting to learn more about about the design and composition of your drawings and paintings. You will want to practice sketching to develop your skills in making choices in this area.Assignments – the basic approach

There are three assignments
Assignment 1: So You Want to Sketch………
Assignment 2: Sketching the Familiar – but from life and outside
Assignment 3: Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone – Sketching in PublicThe reference threads (or “field trips”) for each assignment are posted after the details of all three assignments.

The approach I’m using for this class is underpinned by the following principles:
Self-assessment is the name of the game. Out of the classroom and in the field, you’re on your own – so you need to develop skills in self-assessment. So with every assignment, post your work and then say what you think you did well, what you learned and what you think you can improve.
Nobody is allowed to identify and comment on weaknesses in anybody’s sketch unless they have a very good understanding, through experience, of the differences between drawing from a reference photo and sketching from life or they are also doing this class. The reason for this is that sketching from life is a very, very different experience from drawing from reference photos. What you can achieve in your own personal ‘comfort zone’ and what you might produce ‘in the field’ are always going to be two very different results. They shouldn’t be compared. People also tend to feel much more sensitive about their sketches as they won’t have the degree of finish they know they can achieve when working in other ways. It’s important to be positive about what has been achieved. So – if you want to comment and are not doing the class, you need to show us your sketches – from life and done outside – or start the class and do the assignments!
I won’t be criticising your sketches at all – as I can’t compare it to a photo as no photo can possibly portray exactly what you will have been able to see in front of you.
If you identify a weakness which you think you need help with then see if you work out what help to address this. I will also try to help with some constructive suggestions. I will also help you out with any queries you have and any difficulties you encounter. However I won’t know all the answers – but we can try and work it out together.
The most important thing about the whole class is that:
You learn how to make time for your sketching
You feel comfortable about sketching and how to sketch in a way which suits you
You learn something about what your personal signature style might look like when sketching.
If you also get to sketch in public and thoroughly enjoy it, that’s a bonus.

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:25 PM
Assignment 1 / Week 1: So you want to sketch…..

Do you know what you can achieve in two hours, an hour, half an hour, 15 minutes or 5 minutes? You’ll have a much better idea after doing this assignment!

Introduction

I’m going to start with a very practical issue – time. That is finding time to sketch, how long it takes you to draw and having to observe a time limit for sketching – which is imposed either by yourself or your subject.
This first assignment is therefore about:
Getting familiar with drawing quickly
Learning how to sketch within time constraints
Not fussing about the finish level
Getting the essence of a subject downWe’ll start with the last two.

Things to Think About – how to sketch

But I don’t know to sketch! What do I have to do?

There is no one right way to sketch – just have a go and see what works for you. When you start to sketch, you have the freedom to find a new way of making marks. Try and find out what is your own signature style (everybody’s is different).
Some tips:
Always remember that a sketch is a preliminary drawing or study. Which means:-You do not have to draw the same way you normally work
-You do not have to be “perfect” – people who normally exercise a lot of control to draw highly refined drawings may have difficulty with this one (I did – it took me a very long time to learn how to scribble – but if you keep practising it comes in time and you can even enjoy letting go! ;) )
-You do not have to draw everything
-You do not have to erase if you don’t want to
-You do not have to work the whole sketch to the same level.....or even finish
-You do not have to compose a picture – that can come later with more practice

Draw what you see not what you think you see – keep looking all the time. You can always tell people who are sketching – they’re the ones whose heads are bobbing up and down all the time. As you become more expert and learn to draw more quickly you may well find your head stays up more for more of the time.
Find something to use as a reference for a unit of measurement – and keep measuring as you sketch
Try and find an anchor point from which to measure distances. (I often work out what the centre of my sketch is before I start and that helps with positioning on the page)
If it all seems too much just choose a place to start and work out from there – this can be the same as your anchor point. If you don’t get it all on the page remember it’s just a sketch and try and work out what went wrong.
Identify the main contrasts between colours, tones, textures – this helps with identifying potential focal points for your sketch
Go for big shapes rather than detail – it’s surprising how few details are needed to identify a shape (e.g. a few tile shapes on a roof; a few leaves on a tree)
Look for negative shapes – they’re incredibly helpful to developing an ability to draw quickly and accurately
Describe the differences in values in simple terms (try practising hatching). Five values is probably the minimum for any sketch with tone. If you’re used to using a value scale then try using it for sketching.
Try making marks in different ways – and think about differences in texture when you do.
Using pen and ink is a really good discipline when trying to ‘get your eye in’ – it makes you look more carefully as there is no scope for erasure.
Try recording colours in different ways – but initially focus on sketching without colour until you’re happy you’re getting the hand of it.
Make sure you study what you’re trying to draw and try not to look down too much. Observe, draw, check, correct and check again.Things to think about – drawing quickly

But I can’t draw quickly! I don’t know how to.

Your sketching generally will benefit from being able to draw quickly as this helps you to:
Let go of the ‘control’ that you may normally employ when drawing.
Exercise your visual muscles and stimulates hand-eye co-ordination.
Do more sketches in the time available
Be much less bothered by any sketches that don’t quite work out!Drawing quickly is a skill which can only be developed over time and with practice. People going to life drawing classes for the first time often say that the quick 2-5 minute poses at the beginning are the most difficult. However, they soon begin to understand the huge value that learning to draw quickly can bring. You learn ways of conveying a lot with a little - how few lines or marks are required to represent an image. Lots of practice at looking carefully and drawing quickly helps most people to achieve much more than they ever thought possible

This assignment is a set of exercises which are the equivalent of ‘doing scales’ if you were a pianist or a singer. You can do them anywhere and at any time but they should ideally be done as often as you can.
You may be sketching a person or an animal in a particular pose. You may try to sketch the effect of light at a particular time. Remember that you’re not producing a finished drawing, it doesn’t have to be perfect and you don’t have to sketch everything – but you do need to work out the key things you do need to draw for the sketch to make sense.

If you feel you’re getting quite good at drawing quickly and want to step up a gear ;) , try the following. You’ll draw faster if you can:
Draw at least some of the time without looking at your paper (akin to blind contour drawing (http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_contour_blind.html) and typing without looking at the keyboard)
Store information you have observed after something has moved – and then draw it. Pets are great for practising this!
Assignment 1: What you need to do

Practice drawing quickly from life at home. Before your first sketching trip outside, try seeing what you can sketch at home within set time limits.
This assignment is about doing the sketching equivalent of the “quickies” which people do at the beginning of most life drawing classes. These are essential and you will find these difficult to begin with BUT I guarantee that you will gain confidence and get better the more you do. The main benefit is that it trains your eye to observe more acutely and develops speed in hand-eye co-ordination.

You should choose people / objects / scenes in your own home. What you choose is less important than that you practice drawing quickly. However, you MUST NOT use a photograph to practice drawing quickly.

Set aside an hour in two half an hour slots and produce:
3 sketches of 5 minutes each
1 x 10 minute sketch
1 x 15 minute sketch
1 x 20 minute sketchTry and practice the shapes and type of perspective which you might encounter when you go outside. Try drawing using line only. Try drawing using values only. Do you have time for both? Work out whether drawing in lines or values works better for you.

You’ll find this quite tiring because of the intense observation involved. You may be very disappointed about the quality of the sketches produced. Don’t be. If you’re really, really upset I’ll dig out my old sketchbooks from life drawing class and show you what I used to produce when I started doing 5 minute sketches at the beginning of a life drawing class! :D

If you have another hour produce 2 x 30 minute sketches. And if you have more time, see what you can do in an hour time slot or two hours.

However, the emphasis needs to be on lots of practice in sketching in short time slots. This is about learning to draw differently and quickly in order to sketch in public eventually.

When you have finished:
Post some or all your ‘quickie’ sketches in this thread – make sure you say how long they took
Say what you did well/what you learned and then say what you’re still finding difficult / did less well and need to work on and improve.
Note anything you noticed as you tried drawing more quickly
Evaluate the impact drawing quickly has on your sketching style

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:26 PM
Assignment 2 / Week 1: Sketching the familiar - from life and outside

Your second assignment is to complete a freehand sketch from life and outside / in somewhere familiar where you feel comfortable and are unlikely to be disturbed.

This assignment builds on what you learned in Assignment 1 and is the sketching outside equivalent of dipping a toe in the water! For your first ‘field trip’ outside, try your garden or yard or maybe a nice quiet park. Basically anywhere where you feel comfortable and probably won’t be disturbed by anybody – even your family (especially your family?).

The purpose of Assignment 2 is for you to:
assemble what you would need to sketch outside the home – and find a sketch kit which works for you (it varies from person to person)
become competent at using your sketch kit ‘as if’ you were in public
tackle new challenges associated with sketching from life outside; and
evaluate the impact sketching outside has on how you drawTime your efforts. Maybe identify a regular time to sketch each day. Remember to observe how your style of drawing evolves so that you can draw in a “sketchy” way as well as a more refined way.

Some tips:

A basic sketching kit might comprise just a sketchbook and pencil. However think about the choices you have and what else you might need:
Something to draw on: Type of support / sketchbook / size of sketchbook:
small and unobtrusive sketchbooks don’t tend to attract as much attention in public; larger sketchbooks enable you to draw more of a scene
sketchbooks which lie flat enable you to sketch across the double page spread
sketchbooks with a hardback mean you don’t need a support for the paper
watercolour paper in blocks or sketchbooks enable you to use watercolours if you choose
Something to draw with: Type of drawing instrument
Make sure you have supplies of what ever you find easiest to use – and try this first.
Practice drawing first – and then move on to sketching with paints.
Make colour a second priority; introduce colour after you feel comfortable drawing quickly
Pencil is a good choice, mechanical pencils don’t require sharpening – but don’t provide any variation in quality of line.
Pen and ink requires a suitable surface and refills for the ink.
Pencils require a sharpener and an eraser.
Something to sit on Find something light and portable - unless you’re planning all your sketches in cafes and bars or from a bench in the park!
Drawing aids in the field
Visors and baseball caps help you to see and draw your subject without having the sun in your eyes and without having to use sunglasses (which distort both value and colour)
Try using a viewfinder – you can make it from a piece of card and take out a rectangle in the middle. Be sure that the frame obscures surrounding images so that the view finder works like the viewfinder on your camera.
Try using a scalefinder – this is a Perspex sheet with a grid. It helps to check relative proportions if a subject is complex.
Basic protection
Make sure you pack sun cream and suitable clothing to protect your skin from the sun
Pack bug cream or sprays if you’re likely to be bothered
Some people find a cell phone reassuring
Something to carry it all in
Make sure whatever you decide to take is in something which is easy to carry.
Lots of pockets (in your jacket/coat or bag) make it easy to find things. Things to think about – what needs to be accommodated
Think about where the sun is – and where it’s moving to. What looks great right now might look completely different in half an hour.
Aim for shelter from any wind – it’s difficult to draw when paper is flapping. Make sure you have packed some bulldog clips.Things to think about – that you can control
Try using a view finder to identify what to draw
If sketching a scene, work out:
Your eyeline (re. perspective)
the boundaries of the picture plane (use view finder)
relative proportions (use scale finder)
The big shapes in the key zones: background, middle ground and foreground – and think about aerial perspective and its impact on definition, value and colour across these zones
The major and minor lines in your sketch – and how these can be represented
The number of values in your sketch and where they are. I suggest there are usually at least five values. Squint to see your values. Work out where your darkest darks are and your lightest lights. And then where the middle tone is.
If you want to compose a sketch (and you don’t have to unless you’re trying something out for a possible painting), then a composition checklist (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=179525) can be useful (but no rules have to be followed).See also the reference link in the reference section. You might to think about:
Placement of the focal point and pathways to it and around the sketch
the golden mean / 'rule of thirds' - here's an explanation from a photographer with pictures
finding objects with similar/repeating shapes
the design of the basic value shapes - does the sketch 'read' as a thumbnail or does it look confusing? Assignment 2: What you have to do
Assemble a basic sketching kit.
Identify if you forgot to pack anything in your basic kit (e.g. sharpener, eraser, spare ink cartridges)
Don’t pamper yourself too much! ;) Try drawing sat on a folding stool or with a sketchbook on you knee!
Note how well you respond to and deal with the challenges of drawing from life outside. Reflect on:
The weather and the light, how it changes and how this impacts on you
Use of your viewfinder and/or camera viewfinder – how did you find drawing a scene with being able to see the edges as you can with a photograph?
Your differentiation of different value zones When you have finished:
Post some or all your ‘outside at home’ sketches in this thread – make sure you say how long they took
Evaluate the impact of sketching on the way you draw, say what worked well and what you need to work on.
Say what changes, if any, you will make to your sketching kit before assignment 3.

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:27 PM
Assignment 3 / Week 1-2: Getting out of your comfort zone – Sketching in Public

Introduction

Sketching in public is a big “No No” for many people. The logistics of organising yourself to sketch in public and dealing with the weather are as nothing compared to the fears of what might happen to you! People might talk to you; make rude or silly comment remarks; laugh at your sketches; ask you to do their portrait – you name it, I’ve heard it.

However, the reality for many artists is that many do sketch on a regular basis and positively enjoy what they do – and keep doing it. A recent poll of nearly 600 people visiting the About Painting site suggested that as many as 60% sketch in public at least sometimes and over a quarter (28% or 169 people) sketch anywhere and everywhere.

People sometimes make completely inane comments but YOU WILL COPE. I guarantee that it won’t be a tenth as frightening as you think it will be. You just need to develop some strategies for coping with your anxieties.

For example, try thinking about sketching from a different perspective. I sketch in restaurants and cafes on a regular basis. As soon as I start to sketch I always get excellent service from the waiting staff (who always want to know if they’re in the picture). 100% of the comments I get are from people who are genuinely interested and tend to admire your skills (no matter what the calibre of drawing). However, they might also want to tell you about a child prodigy of their acquaintance or tell you how they have never been able to draw[1] (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/#_ftn1). You can handle this!

Things to think about – what needs to be accommodated
All the things from assignment 2 concerning weather and lightThings to think about – that you can control
Always pick a view which speaks to you at a personal level and that you’ll enjoy doing – I guarantee that it’s the one that stays in your brain as you walk around looking at options
Practice identifying views to sketch when you have no kit with you. You’ll end up with a list of views you want to do and you’ll never have a problem about what to do next!
Don’t plonk yourself down in a place with foot traffic – you’ll just get bumped and jostled and find the whole experience thoroughly unpleasant.
Try and find a spot which means nobody can come up behind you. Having your back to a wall or sitting in a corner are both good options.
If you’re female and on your own be very, very sensible about picking isolated spots and let people know where you’ve gone.
If you climb down (or up) to something with all your kit, do make sure you are capable of climbing back up (or down) with all your kit! Or even without it?
Work out where “the facilities” are before you need them! Believe me, you’ll be amazed at how engrossed you can get in your sketching……….. ;)
Don’t be afraid of choosing something small or doing several small sketches of small details – you don’t have to do everything!
If the drawing challenge just swamps you, take photos and then just try doing colour swatches and a value scale – makes note of which colour / value relates to which bit of the image in question.Assignment 3: What you have to do

Your assignment for the second week is to spend as much time as you have available sketching in public. That’s it! This is the “getting out of the comfort zone” “feel the fear and do it anyway” assignment!
You can do as many or as few sketches as you like – but they have to be in a public place.

Before you go on your “field trip” for real you will need to:
Identify potentially suitable locations
Think about how you can make time (remembering that you’re doing sketches and have practised drawing for short intervals) e.g. is this something you can do during your lunch break at work?
Practice drawing quickly (Assignment 1)
Find a folding chair (Assignment 2) or locate somewhere with seats to sketch
Assemble an easily portable sketching kit (see Assignment 2)If you’re feeling nervous or uncertain, I suggest you try the following first:
Sketch an interior
No light or weather issues to deal with
Try a café of coffee shop or similar where the basic structure stays the same but people tend to come and go
Practice drawing people from a distance. See how much (or rather how little) detail is needed to represent a person. Skip the details you don’t need
Sketch outside and see how you cope with choosing a view, finding somewhere to locate yourself, dealing with the changing light and the weather. Don’t worry about how the sketch comes out, get comfortable with the process first.When you have completed your assignment,
post your completed sketches in this thread – and give it a title if you think it deserves one
State how long the sketches took you and what media you used
Identify what you learned, what went well and what you still need to work on
Invite comments and criticisms which might be less than totally complimentary only if you wish to receive them. Be specific as to any query you have.[1] (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/#_ftnref1) When people tell me they’ve never been able to draw but wish they could I always tell them about Betty Edwards’s book “Drawing on the Right Side of your Brain” which is very accessible and teaches people how to see. If they look internet savvy you might also mention the Drawing 101 classes!

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:28 PM
Reference Threads / The other sort of “Fieldtrip”

These references relate to sketching and preliminary drawings. They show you how other artists have sketched over the centuries up to the current day – and also provide some additional material and support for sketching in public. You might want to take a browse through the reference threads before you start, particularly those which show you sketchbooks of well known artists – and people who currently have sketchbook blogs.

Why people sketch

Playing with the Provisional (http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2006/02/playing-with-provisional.html) – a review of a lecture b
y Professor Deanna Petherbridge, formerly Professor of Drawing at the Royal College of Art

Books with frameworks for self-evaluation
Bert Dodson “Keys to Drawing” (paperback)Art History – some artists who sketched a lot outside/in public

This list was put together by me with the enthusiastic assistance of Judy Pinkrybns who is the Moderator of the Art History Forum – thanks for all your help Judy. We’re going to create a thread for these sketching references in the Art History Forum so if you have any good ones you’ll be able to add them in there.
Rembrandt van Rijn (http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/bio/r/rembran/biograph.html) (Dutch 1606-1669)
Link: Good example of Rembrandt’s sketches and drawings can be found in
the British Museum (http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/pd/factsheets/rembrandt.html) and
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?coll_accession=&coll_name=&coll_place=&coll_medium=&coll_culture=&coll_credit=&coll_provenance=&coll_has_images=1&coll_keywords=&coll_sort=0&coll_sort_order=0&submit=Search&coll_classification=Drawings&coll_art)
Getty Museum – sketch of an artist in his studio (http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=190&handle=li)
JMW Turner (http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/BrowseGroup?cgroupid=999999951) (English 1775-1851) produced 300 sketchbooks and around 30,000 sketches and watercolours on his travels.
Five years after his death, the majority of his art was bequeathed to the nation and is housed at Tate Britain Turner sketchbooks, Turner Bequest, Tate Britain (http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?recview=true&id=274301&coll_keywords=&coll_accession=&coll_name=&coll_artist=&coll_place=&coll_medium=&coll_culture=&coll_classification=&coll_credit=&coll_provenance=&coll_location=&coll_has_images=&coll_on_vi)
John Constable (http://www.artchive.com/artchive/C/constable.html) (English 1776 - 1837) believed in the importance of working from life and based his paintings on drawings of the landscape.
The current exhibition of his landscapes at Tate Britain (http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/constable/) focuses on the relationship between his sketching and the production of six foot canvases.
Sketchbook at the Victoria and Albert Museum (http://www.vam.ac.uk/collections/paintings/galleries/display/constable/index.html)
Oil sketches at the Victoria and Albert Museum (http://www.vam.ac.uk/collections/paintings/galleries/display/constable_oil/index.html)
Conrad Martens (http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/ConradMarten/conradmartens.html) (English 1801 - 1878) – who accompanied Darwin on the Beagle as expedition artist and produced three detailed sketchbooks of places visited and objects seen on the expedition.
this is the story of his sketchbooks (http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/ConradMarten/sketchbooks.html) from the Beagle expedition which are in the Cambridge University Library
this is the itinerary of the expedition (http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/ConradMarten/itinerary.html))
these are some of the sketchbook images (http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/ConradMarten/results.php?name=Plants&category=P&type=leafy%20trees&subcategory=l). Most are in graphite. Click on an image to see a larger image and more detail about it.
Cezanne (http://www.expo-cezanne.com/2.cfm) (French 1839 - 1906) is often called ‘Father of Modern Art’. He worked from life and made detailed observations of form in his drawings and sketches as well as his paintings.
Pencil and watercolour drawings (http://www.expo-cezanne.com/1_2.cfm) (from life)
Pencil sketches (http://www.expo-cezanne.com/1_2.cfm)
Vincent Van Gogh (http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/gogh/) (Dutch 1853 - 1890) made preliminary drawings (sketches) prior to developing his paintings. He often drew with a reed pen and ink. He probably has one of the most interesting range of marks – which some say were notations for the colours he saw.
Examples from the 2005 exhibition of Van Gogh Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum, New York (http://www.metmuseum.org/special/Van_Gogh/images.asp)
John Singer Sargent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Singer_Sargent) (1856 - 1925) – examples of sketches from
an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (http://www.metmuseum.org/special/se_event.asp?OccurrenceId=%7bA238C1BA-B848-11D3-936D-00902786BF44%7d) and
the collection at Harvard (http://www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/sargent/servlet/webpublisher.WebCommunication?ia=tr&ic=pt&t=xhtml&x=home)
Various American Artists: Smithsonian Museum – Sketchbooks in the Archives of American Art (http://archivesofamericanart.si.edu/guides/curators-visual/index.cfm)
Henry Moore (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Moore) (English 1898 - 1986)
early drawings (1916-1939) of ideas / for sculptures (http://www.henry-moore-fdn.co.uk/matrix_engine/content.php?page_id=2974)
David Hockney (http://www.answers.com/topic/david-hockney) (English 1937 – present day)
sketches (http://arts.guardian.co.uk/page/0,,869624,00.html) Technical Reference Links
Compositional models (http://studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/cm-visual.html)
Atmospheric or Aerial perspective (http://studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/ap-aerial.html)
Linear perspective (http://studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/draw.html) or see Class 2 on Intermediate Perspective
Greyscale and planar values (http://studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/s-grays.html)Wet Canvas - Reference Threads

These are some reference threads from within Wet Canvas
“Do You Ever Sketch in Public? (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=4668704&posted=1#post4668704)” - a poll within the Drawing and Sketching forum with people’s comments on their responses.
“Venice Blog (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=270236)” – a thread I produced showing sketches I produced while in Venice. It includes some tips about sketching generally and pictures of my overseas holiday sketchkit
“Getting Out of Our Comfort Zone (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=274227)” – a thread I started relating to sketching with coloured pencils.
“I’m a sketchbook sinner – anyone else” (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=350183) – the sketchbook: workhorse or show horse? a D&S Forum thread discussing what people put in their sketchbooks –
“What’s your favourite make of sketchbook? (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=350772)” - I started this thread just before this one so that people will have somewhere to discuss different brands of sketchbooks and their relative pros and cons.
"Drawing 101: Sketching (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=276174)" this was the sketching thread from the Drawing 101 Basic classes
In addition both the Drawing and Sketching forum and the Artwork from Life have regular ‘round robin’ sketching threads which are popular.Sketch Blogs

These are some weblogs which show you how other people sketch all the time and everywhere.

Laurelines (http://laurelines.typepad.com/my_weblog/) – Laura has a theme for each month and produces a sketch – working from life – on that theme each day. She does a lot of her sketches in public places. You can see the sketches of themes from previous months in the galleries in the left hand column.
Learning Daily (http://learndaily.blogspot.com/) – Cindy does brilliant line contour drawings and posts them virtually every day. Take a look at all the sketches she did in May in Boston and New York.
A Creative Journey (http://www.karensblog.com/) – Karen has no fear of sketching in public and loves her sketchbooks.
Russ Stetler’s Sketchbook (http://www.stutler.cc/other/sketchbook/sketchbook.html) – features sketches of his life in Japan – see the images of his sketchkit, him sketching on the underground and his recommended list of sketching books (http://www.stutler.cc/other/sketchbook/booklist.html)
One Mile From Home (http://onemilefromhome.blogspot.com/) – you can get fit while sketching! Julie walks a mile, makes a record of where she has been (usually with a sketch) and then walks home again – everyday!
Sketchcrawl Blog (http://www.sketchcrawl.com/) is a communal blog for compulsive sketchers and this is the website of the global sketchcrawl (http://www.sketchcrawl.com/).Do this class and next time you might be participating or organising your own local sketchcrawl!

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 07:35 PM
My goodness, that took some organisation [phew!] but we're now open for enrollment!

Anita Murphy
06-04-2006, 07:52 PM
I'm enrolling but need time to read this carefully ........:clap: Katherine for all the effort!!!!!!

Katherine T
06-04-2006, 08:14 PM
If you want to add any links to sketchbooks by well-known artists then please visit the Famous Artists sketchbooks and sketch collections (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=350863) thread in the Art History Forum which lists the art history references identified above and which has been started for this purpose

Mary Woodul
06-04-2006, 08:41 PM
This is brilliant Katherine and very new to me so I will concentrate on this more than ever!

Striver
06-04-2006, 09:02 PM
WOW, you put some work into this already, very impressive.
Please Please Please may I enroll.
Aand now to read it all indepth.
Regards
Les

JayD
06-04-2006, 09:20 PM
Officially, I am in! I have to draw a bowl of mushrooms and I have this job thing that I do but I am putting daily time aside to sketch, Katherine--this looks very exciting! PLUS!!! I get to pull some more pig tails!!!

mauricar
06-04-2006, 09:34 PM
Count me in. I will start on this tomorrow. GOing to bed with a head cold right now. Hopefully will feel better tomorrow. Midge

ArtyLady
06-04-2006, 09:35 PM
I love challenges. I'm going to participate in this one if there are no objections!

Judi1957
06-04-2006, 10:26 PM
Wow- Katherine-I will need some time to read all of this. TY for all your hard work!:clap: :thumbsup:

Fireman's kid
06-04-2006, 10:50 PM
Wow! Great information here! I started reading but must come back to finish since it's bedtime. I'm subscribing to this thread but will probably not get to the assignments until well after it is officially over. :crying: But I'll be watching with great interest and cheering everyone on. :)

Thanks Katherine for your hard work in wrinting this class!! :clap: :clap:

Robin Neudorfer
06-05-2006, 01:38 AM
Thank you Katherine for such a great lesson. So many will benefit from the chance to sketch in the safety of our classroom. We are among friends and family. This is the most thoughtful and caring place to practice this skill.
I will continue to sketch, and pursue those challenges that plague me. You my fellow classmates, will see life clearer from this practice, and come to know yourself deeper as the artists you are.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 02:17 AM
Thanks everybody. Sorry for the length - but sketching from scratch is a fairly big topic; there aren't that many books about sketching about and I didn't know whether everybody would be able to get access to one.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 03:50 AM
Isn't it always the way! You finish loading your text - and then you remember what you've missed out and/or you come across this really great link!

Anyway:

New link to exhibition of artists' sketchbooks at the Fogg Museum: 1 August - 22 October 2006

An exhibition of artist sketchbooks is on show at the Fogg Museum, Harvard University. This is the link to the reference page (http://www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/exhibitions/fogg/underCover.html) and what it has to say. Their description of sketchbooks certainly accords with my experience of what mine get used for at one time and another!

Designed to be easily portable, a sketchbook is often kept in an artist's pocket and offers an unusually personal glimpse into the artist at work. Drawings and notes in sketchbooks vary from travel sketches and nature and figure studies to copies after the Old Masters, expense accounts, and lists of pictures. Some sketchbooks are self-conscious, with every page signed, while others are filled with seemingly random, hastily drawn sketches and doodles. Still others reveal the progression of an idea or are conceived as a whole.

This exhibition features a selection of the Fogg's important sketchbooks, including works by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Jacques-Louis David, Sanford Gifford, Edward Burne-Jones, John Singer Sargent, Reginald Marsh, George Grosz, and Christopher Wilmarth. The installation will also present pages from sketchbooks by John Constable, Edouard Manet, Henry Moore, Brice Marden, and others.
There will also be a Website, www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/sketchbooks (http://www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/sketchbooks), focusing on a selection of sketchbooks when the exhibition opens.

I'm going to be in New England in September and will certainly be going to this exhibition!

Amendments to links list

I've just been testing all the links (again!) and the Rembrandt / MFA Boston one seems to be a bit of a problem as it keeps coming up Winslow Homer - which is great for the sketches but not what I was anticipating. i think it might be one those curator's choice things which rotates over time.

Also: I left the wrong Turner sketchbook link in by mistake. This is the correct link to all Turner's sketchbooks from the 1780s to the 1840s (http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/BrowseGroup?cgroupid=999999995)

On a few of them it's now more apparent that you need to submit a search to get the result - as follows:
Singer Sargent - Harvard collection: search for sketchbook and you will get 20 pages. Ignore the first couple which for some reason have a lot of images missing - after that it gets really good (http://www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/sargent/servlet/webpublisher.WebCommunication?ia=sasearch&ic=basic&pg=2&txtFullText=%20&txtAccNum=%20&op=%20&txtSubject=%20&txtMedium=%20&txtLocation=%20&txtProject=%20&txtWater=)!
Cezanne - you need to do a search on the website link under technique (http://www.expo-cezanne.com/1.cfm)to access
the graphite drawings and
the pencil and watercolour drawings Sorry - and I hope these mistakes didn't waste your time!

vhere
06-05-2006, 04:47 AM
wow! you've put so much thought and research into this it's excellent. Love the links, agree totally with all that you've said and I'm going to try to keep up the assignments and join :)


and I particularly agree with the Sargent quote about curiosity - that's how I see sketching, investigating and exploring a subject and working out the language of marks and colours to express it.

mothsailor
06-05-2006, 05:51 AM
Wow! What an amazing amount of information. Thanks very much for all that work, Katherine.

A few old timers might remember this thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=237149&highlight=sketchbooks) which contains some links to sketchbooks and sketchblogs.

I'm going to be taking the train into London later this morning...wonder if I dare do some sketching on the journey? :eek:

vhere
06-05-2006, 05:59 AM
here's some other sketchbook links you may find interesting:

http://www.artnet.com/magazine/features/mumford/mumford12-13-04.asp war sketches

http://www.iw.net/~jpollock/polsketch/sketchbooksmain.html avid sketchbook user!

http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/BrowseGroup?cgroupid=999999995 Turners sketchbooks at the Tate Gallery

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/ac/tracey/sketchbook.html a variety of very different sketchbooks

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 06:08 AM
Thanks for the links - they are very interesting indeed.

Could people please note that I'm really keen at this stage of the Class to keep sketchbook links to ones which are very much associated with sketching from life - rather than from photographs or imagination - as the focus of the sketching class is all about sketching from life. It's going to really help people who are new to sketching from life to see what's possible.

Sketching in relation to imagination is a whole other topic area and I'm sure we could have a separate reference thread for all other sorts of sketchbooks if that would be more practicable.

Also, could people also put the links to sketches by famous artists only in the Art History Forum Resources thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=350863) which we've started for that purpose. We've already corrected the faulty Turner link above.

And train sketching - go for it! I always find it helps if you try and sketch something 10+ feet away - that way the subjects don't peer over your sketchbook! ;) We'll see what you come up with this evening :D

Anita Murphy
06-05-2006, 06:20 AM
Great to have you in class with us Vivien!

Dave - :wave: hey stranger!!!!

JayD
06-05-2006, 06:37 AM
Katherine, I am probably not going to do this myself but are sketches from gardening journals allowed? They are generally sketched from life.

kennychaffin
06-05-2006, 06:41 AM
Officially, I am in! I have to draw a bowl of mushrooms and I have this job thing that I do but I am putting daily time aside to sketch, Katherine--this looks very exciting! PLUS!!! I get to pull some more pig tails!!!

Yeah those dang mushrooms. Who's idea was that anyway??? :)

I think I'm in Katherine. I need to read over that plethoria of info first though. The job thing definitely puts a cramp in my artistic karma.

KAC

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 06:56 AM
JayD - I'm not sure I've quite understood what question your're asking. But I'll try to cover all the bases!

none of the sketches in this class will be done from photos
sketchbook links are very welcome - but could you please limit these to ones where the majority of sketches are done from life - so people can see what others produce when sketching from life - this is part of the learning process
a sketch from life does not have to be in an artists' sketchbook - any sketch done from life is very acceptable. Gardening journals are an excellent example of a place where people draw things - but for a totally different purpose - they're making a record rather than 'creating art' - but the process is essentially the same. (I think we'll make the medical artist off limits though! ;) :D )

vhere
06-05-2006, 07:50 AM
ok - here's 3 not particularly good 5 minute sketches to start us off:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/53888-rosie_charcoal_pencil.jpg

a 5 min quick sketch of her ladyship reclining on my chair in charcoal pencil. The charcoal pencil is a bit dry and coarse for such a small sketch (done in 6x4 sketchbook) and of course she moved before I'd finished :rolleyes:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/53888-pencil_sketches_of_Rosie.jpg

next quick mechanical pencil sketches (B lead I think) I loved the position of her head, showing the underneath of her chin, looking very sweet and vulnerable - of course she moved :rolleyes: so the head is unfinished.

The series of little sketches below are another 5 minutes work.

I've only recently gone back to using pencil again after a long long gap and I quite like the mechanical pencil to use and take it out with me.

She has a very complicated and to me, beautiful pattern, which is an essential part of her character and helps describe the form. The light from the window was straight onto her, so not much in the way of shadow to see.

What interested me? character, form, texture, pattern - the light was flat so in this case that wasn't a key element.

what worked? well it's very much 'her'

Difficulty? a model who can't keep still, small scale

I like working fast and freely so that wasn't a problem.

what did I learn? every sketch adds to the fluency of drawing. I've sketched her fairly often so she's a familiar, if difficult subject.

Observation is crucial, a cat's features take up less of the head than beginners think - the space from the eyes up and round the back of the head is much more than people often realise.

Any comments or crit are welcome - I shan't sulk!

vhere
06-05-2006, 08:40 AM
ps - using charcoal I had time to suggest more of the background and i think that's often important - drawing background and subject at the same time so that they 'gel' and dark or light areas define the subject without needing to draw edges in - that sounds as clear as mud! sorry if it sounds garbled.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 08:41 AM
Lovely fluent "quickies" Viv - and thanks for getting us off to a great start.

As I know you know, pets are great for the quickie 'keep your hand' in sketches. I try and keep a sketchbook just for my cat drawings - although it's not always the one I pick up when one of my two is doing something interesting.

I like the fact your proportions are all very much OK. Proportion is difficult to get right when doing quickie sketches - and it's where practice with the same subject can pay off. The sketchy nature of the marks actually enhance the drawing for me.

Do you like the montage effect you get sometimes when drawing things? I think it makes sketchbook pages more interesting.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 08:47 AM
ps - using charcoal I had time to suggest more of the background and i think that's often important - drawing background and subject at the same time so that they 'gel' and dark or light areas define the subject without needing to draw edges in - that sounds as clear as mud! sorry if it sounds garbled.
Charles Reid (who is an excellent watercolourist and a much sought after tutor who writes excellent books) always referred to it as "going for the big blur".

It's that bit where you sketch on the basis of values rather than outlines.

So if the shadow on cat and the shadow on the side of a chair are pretty much the same value the priority is to draw the value shape rather than to try some articificial separation because, in reality, you can't actually see the boundaries.

I think you start to see the "big blur" shapes much, much better only after you start practising drawing quickie thumbnail sketches for potential paintings - when you always log the design of the value pattern, rather than the contour lines of the objects.

And that's another reason for doing quickies - they help you with thumbnail sketches!

vhere
06-05-2006, 08:49 AM
thanks :)

yes, I love your cat sketches but ooooohhhhhh don't you have to work fast to catch them!

and yes, I do really like pages with multiple sketches, sometimes overlapping, showing different aspects etc - it's almost like animation at times, there's a sense of life and movement.


the images in your signature line are an ideal illustration of the point I was making about the importance of backgrounds creating the form.

cmwynn
06-05-2006, 08:52 AM
I have been planning to do just this for forty years now, maybe I will do it and stick to it this time. Thanks for all the work you have already put into this.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 09:00 AM
Connie - if you get to do something you've been planning to do for 40 years as a result of this class you will really make my day!:thumbsup:

Glad to have you along.......

quaya
06-05-2006, 09:46 AM
I hope it's not too late to join...I need to do this..

gibson99
06-05-2006, 09:47 AM
Bravo Katherine. You have certainly put a lot of effort into this. I have read assignment one and am ready to go. Thank you for being the Professor on this.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 10:11 AM
the images in your signature line are an ideal illustration of the point I was making about the importance of backgrounds creating the form.

Wouldn't you know it! As in the old signature line!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/48045-web_Three-Parrots-v2.jpg

I've just changed it for sketches of artists doing sketches! :D

Mary Woodul
06-05-2006, 10:43 AM
Vivien, beautifull sketches and very legible for someone like me that needs to see how others use their lines.

artdude
06-05-2006, 11:16 AM
GREAT class Kat!! :clap: :thumbsup: :clap:
Very informative and well written! :)

Don't forget to Rate this Thread people! :D





Murray :cool:
==================

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 11:21 AM
Quaya and John - welcome to the class!

I've urged my cats to participate as well and Polly obliged and went to sleep!

Here are a couple of small 3-4 minute sketches (5.5" x 3.5") - maybe about the same size as on your screen.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/48045-web_Polly-demo-values.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/48045-web_Polly-demo-contour.jpg

One is predominantly sketched in terms of values and the other is contour line only and no shading. It's a good idea to be able to develop skills at doing both - sometimes a contour line is effective, sometimes you need the values.

Flamingo
06-05-2006, 11:55 AM
I'm in, I hope! I had just decided about a week or so ago that my goal was to sketch/draw something everyday. I have put away my paints and am concentrating on drawing as it is so easy to have my (few) supplies always with me and no mess to clean up. ( I do have some pastels handy and watercolor pencils just to add color should I get the fancy.) I'm sure this class is going to help me stay true to my goal. Now I need to go back and read.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 12:19 PM
Jeannie - nice to meet you.

I'm going to pop up with the message which follows from time to time as people get on board. It isn't directed at Jeannie in particular - although not being able to see any of her work has in fact prompted this comment. It's also aimed at anybody who is not familiar with the Drawing 101 series.

Can I just remind people that this is an Intermediate Class and not a class to teach you how to draw. The Drawing 101 series of lessons will cover a lot of what you need to know if you want to draw better and will also keep you busy for a very long time!
So if you want to draw every day but haven't developed your drawing skills too much as yet, can I commend the very popular Drawing 101 series to you.
However, if you've graduated from Drawing 101 and/or are reasonably confident about your drawing skills - but have never sketched outside/in public and want to able to do so - then this is the class for you.My focus is going to be very much on supporting people to develop sketching skills and confidence around sketching in public in a way which is enjoyable for them.

Judi1957
06-05-2006, 12:41 PM
Hey Katherine:wave: There is soooo much info here. I would have never imagined in a million years there was so much to know or event to think about with sketching!
Just some line drawings here. I think I was more interested in time here and should have thought more about the values-which I apparently ignored.:rolleyes: I'll work on that as I go along.

vhere
06-05-2006, 12:45 PM
more quick sketches - she was constantly fidgeting and tucking her paw over her nose and the line sketches were done when she out into the garden - again moving non stop

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y98/vivien2/multiplerosies.jpg

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 01:10 PM
Judi - learning to sketch is almost like learning to draw all over again.

I'd liken it to being a little bit similar to the way in which we begin to develop our own handwriting style once we've got writing our letters sorted. First of all we do joined up writing, then we start to decide which of the rules we were taught we're going to relax. And finally we decide whether our handwriting should be very controlled (maybe small and precise and no loops) or whether it should be very relaxed (maybe large and florid with loops everywhere!) or somewhere inbetween. It's a metaphor which might come across as a bit patronising - but it's the nearest analogy I can think of. Letting go of the control we have developed means we release more of our own individual artistic voices. I'm of the opinion that once you know somebody's sketching style you can recognise their paintings and vice versa.

BTW I love your office sketch on what looks like the official office sketchpad! And very speedy!

Viv - lovely puddy tats. That repetitive washing action is a very good test of being able to capture movement.

mmdm
06-05-2006, 01:20 PM
Can I just remind people that this is an Intermediate Class and not a class to teach you how to draw. The Drawing 101 series of lessons will cover a lot of what you need to know if you want to draw better and will also keep you busy for a very long time!

What about people who are reasonable confident in their drawing skills if they are in their house, drawing an object that never moves, and have an hour and a big eraser, LOL? I hope it is OK for me to join, because I started the homework last night. I read through most of the 101 sketching class, but I just found people posting their sketches. It's a really long thread, so maybe I missed the guidance parts, but I look through each page twice. I've already learned a bit from what you posted at the beginning of the class here, so I hope I am welcome. I am very interested in learning to sketch quickly in public, but although I've always had a sketchbook to do drawings in, I just started trying to do quick life sketches a little over a week ago I guess. They suck, LOL, so I need help! If it is ok, I'll post what I've done for homework after I finish my lunch.

frida
06-05-2006, 01:20 PM
So... Where is the Registrar's Office? One enrolls just by saying "I am in"? If that's so, I AM IN! :wave:

Lots of material to read. Thanks Katherine!

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 01:35 PM
What about people who are reasonable confident in their drawing skills if they are in their house, drawing an object that never moves, and have an hour and a big eraser, LOL? I hope it is OK for me to join, because I started the homework last night. I read through most of the 101 sketching class, but I didn't find any instruction or guidance, just people posting their sketches. It's a really long thread, so maybe I missed the guidance parts, but I look through each page twice. I've already learned a bit from what you posted at the beginning of the class here, so I hope I am welcome. I am very interested in learning to sketch quickly in public, but although I've always had a sketchbook to do drawings in, I just started trying to do quick life sketches a little over a week ago I guess. They suck, LOL, so I need help! If it is ok, I'll post what I've done for homework after I finish my lunch.Melisa - I've had a quick look at your work elsewhere on WC and I think you should be fine. The previous drawing instruction I was referring to is the whole of the Drawing 101 series rather than just the previous sketching thread. The Drawing 102 series of lessons - of which this class is a part - is for people who have reached an Intermediate level in drawing and assumes that people have acquired a level of competence at basic drawing skills.

Do not worry about initial sketches from life leaving something to be desired - it happens to most people! All those skills you thought you had appear to have just gone pffft! :eek: All because you're now working in a different way and drawing from life and/or trying to draw more quickly and/or capture things that move etc.

That's why we're focusing on building people's confidence before we get to the bit where the sun keeps passing in and out of the clouds and all the shadows keep changing!;)

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 01:38 PM
So... Where is the Registrar's Office? One enrolls just by saying "I am in"? If that's so, I AM IN! :wave:

Lots of material to read. Thanks Katherine!:wave:Raquel - lovely to see you! [big hugs!]

Now no need to ask you about your drawing abilities ;) - I'm going to recommend that you have a good look through those reference threads - I have a feeling you'll get all the stimulation you need from those.

I think I would however recommend hanging back on the colour until you're feeling confident about drawing in graphite or pen and ink. I'm fully expecting to see a coloured pencil sketch from you by the end though! :D

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 01:45 PM
GREAT class Kat!! :clap: :thumbsup: :clap:
Very informative and well written! :)

Don't forget to Rate this Thread people! :D

Murray :cool:
==================Murray - thanks for this and sorry I've didn't reply earlier - this thread has already started to motor! I think you posted while I was in the middle of a reply and I didn't see your post until later :rolleyes:

I also enjoyed preparing the class - and it means I've finally got an answer for all those people who have been asking me to do this for simply ages! :D;):thumbsup:

Molesworth
06-05-2006, 01:52 PM
Thank you Katherine, for all your hard work and excellent advice. I'll definitely be trying this over the next few weeks.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 02:11 PM
Hi Molesworth - Good to see some new faces - and I think I remember from one of the other threads that you've been out sketching before.

Are there any places you fancy sketching around Swansea? I wonder whether we'll be seeing you out sketching waves off The Mumbles?

mmdm
06-05-2006, 02:22 PM
OK, here is what I got done on my homework before I ran out of time. The first is my couch potato hubby who promised not to move, but did it anyway, continuously (10 min). The next are supposed to be 5 minute sketches of my 2 dogs but they didn't stay in the same position for 5 minutes. Those are all in pen. The last is a 20 min. of my music stand done in mechanical pencil.<br>
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/9614-10mincouchpotato.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/9614-bssketches1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/9614-bssketches2.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/9614-20minmusicstand.jpg

OK, evaluation is hard. What do I like about them? Hmm, well you can pretty much tell what they are, if not who they are. A couple of the dog ones did capture a little of what is unique about them, I think. Why can't they just stay still for 5 minutes, though! :lol: Also, there is something about a sketch that can make a subject interesting even if a detailed drawing of the same subject wouldn't be. I think the music stand one fits this, though it would look much better in ink and of course, I hope to learn to do a better job of it.

What I think I need help with -
1. I want to sketch directly with pen so I don't waste time erasing, but I'm not sure how to go about it. If doing a drawing of the hubby, I would start with ovals, sticks, give it a foundation kind of thing and then flesh it out from there. But I can't do that with pen because I don't want all that to show, and I don't think there would be time for it in a quick sketch, either.

2. Where to start. If I were drawing the hubby and got the skeleton on there and realized it wouldn't fit, I could adjust. Working quickly and directly in pen doesn't allow for that. Drawing from life doesn't give me the boundaries like I have with a photo. I know I could use a viewfinder but honestly, if I am out in public I am not going to call attention to myself by doing that. And it isn't just about getting it all on the page. If sketching a person, do you start with the head and continue down the body, or what is the best way.

3. Proportion. This will come with practice I know. The hubby really does have those short stubby legs, but one foot is much too big and his arms should be heavier.

4. This is where I need LOTS of help. Shading. When I draw in pencil, I smudge and blend for shadows. Same with painting. I don't know what to do with the pen. I know about hatching, but don't know how to use it affectively. How do you know when to go which direction, ect.? Should black really be black? How much shading should be used. I don't have a clue and it shows. The hubby one doesn't really have any shading whatsoever because I ran out of time. My dogs are black and white and I'm not sure how to show they are black, yet show the shadows. I know how I would do it in paint, but not in a quick pen sketch.

5. Someone please tell me what to do about faces in quick sketches. There is no time for a likeness, but even getting them to look like a normal person is hard. I need examples I think, but most of the ones I've already looked at are much too detailed for me to hope for when sketching at coffee shops, ect. I can't even SEE the faces well enough to do that.

Any and all help and suggestions appreciated, please!

wabbitt
06-05-2006, 02:25 PM
:wave: I've got questions!

This past weekend and upcoming week or two, I will have very little time to myself. So, for example, I still wanted to participate in this weekend's Drawing Event. Last night I set out to do a series of 5-10 minute sketches of the grandkids faces but I would "cheat" and end up fiddling a bit more with the sketch. Would it make sense to use some kind of timer and force a stop and just post at that point?

I can't seem to get away from tonal blending, so I use a stump or tortillion. Is that too much for this assignment, even if it falls within the time limit?

mmdm
06-05-2006, 02:26 PM
Oh, I forgot something else I would like help with. Indistinct shapes, like the plant. If I can't see edges, I don't know what to draw. If I'm doing a quick sketch, I can't possibly draw every leaf, even if I could see them all, which I can't. Paint is so much easier!

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 02:38 PM
:wave: I've got questions!

This past weekend and upcoming week or two, I will have very little time to myself. So, for example, I still wanted to participate in this weekend's Weekend Drawing Event. Last night I set out to do a series of 5-10 minute sketches of the grandkids faces but I would "cheat" and end up fiddling a bit more with the sketch. Would it make sense to use some kind of timer and force a stop and just post at that point?

I can't seem to get away from tonal blending, so I use a stump or tortillion. Is that too much for this assignment, even if it falls within the time limit?Julie - quickie answers to quickie questions! ;)
if you cheat on the 5-10 minutes you're only cheating yourself. there's no requirement to do this - but anybody who has ever had to try doing quickie sketches and has perservered will tell you it's worth it. Good idea - get a timer! (If nothing else when you decide you want to go on and do a life class at some point, you won't be flummoxed when the model changes her pose!)
Re tortillons/blending stumps - I can only tell you what I do - which is to only use my fingers for quickies. And we're talking swish rather than careful control.I think you need to bear in mind that there are things you need to adapt and things you need to let go of to cope with sketching quickly. You won't always want to sketch quickly - but you will want to develop the ability to do so.

Try practising hatching in different directions and layers to get your tonal values. Just sit there watching television hatching on rough paper until you've got control and can do it fast. Hatch within shapes, don't worry if it's not exact.

Anita Murphy
06-05-2006, 02:59 PM
I did some sketches at work today - I'm still at work but couldn't resist a quick sneak at the class while no-one is looking. Will post later.

Vivien - great cats!

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 03:08 PM
First off well done on your pen drawings of hubby and dogs - I think they're great - and you were definitely getting something going with the dogs. The fact they move makes you try to remember what they were doing. Guess what - when you're sketching quite often things move and you have to draw what you can remember - so practising drawing pets is an excellent exercise. Maybe have a sketchbook just for the dogs? Of course you could have one brightly labelled "The Challenge of the Couch Potato" but he might start giving you funny looks! :D Seriously though - well done
What I think I need help with -
1. I want to sketch directly with pen so I don't waste time erasing, but I'm not sure how to go about it. If doing a drawing of the hubby, I would start with ovals, sticks, give it a foundation kind of thing and then flesh it out from there. But I can't do that with pen because I don't want all that to show, and I don't think there would be time for it in a quick sketch, either.Keep doing what you're doing. Did you see the sketches of Polly I did earlier? I forgot to mention that I did both with a pen. If you do the contour drawing first that helps to train your eye to sketch with a pen. Then when you're feeling more comfortable (and it won't come quickly - this is a practice/practice/practice gig!) you can try hatching in value shapes. But your current drawings look very promising.
2. Where to start. If I were drawing the hubby and got the skeleton on there and realized it wouldn't fit, I could adjust. Working quickly and directly in pen doesn't allow for that. Drawing from life doesn't give me the boundaries like I have with a photo. I know I could use a viewfinder but honestly, if I am out in public I am not going to call attention to myself by doing that. And it isn't just about getting it all on the page. If sketching a person, do you start with the head and continue down the body, or what is the best way.The lack of boundaries is the thing which has a seriously big impact on people used to drawing from photographs. Some quickie tricks - use a camera rather than a viewfinder if that feels more 'normal' when outside in public. Work out where the big lines cut the picture plane and mark them up loosely to start with.

To be honest I didn;t get drawing people right until I went to life class. The advice I had from my tutor was that learning to draw people from life will teach you how to draw just about anything - and he was right.

Again, you need to work out for yourself what small trick makes drawing people easier for you. Not everybody responds to standard techniques. For me, I work out exactly where the centrepoint is both vertically and horzontally and I sketch out from that. Very unconventional - but it works for me!

3. Proportion. This will come with practice I know. The hubby really does have those short stubby legs, but one foot is much too big and his arms should be heavier. Correct - and well observed. Foreshortening is the trickiest thing to get your head round - it just looks so wrong! But when you measure you usually find it's even more distorted than you realised.
4. This is where I need LOTS of help. Shading. When I draw in pencil, I smudge and blend for shadows. Same with painting. I don't know what to do with the pen. I know about hatching, but don't know how to use it affectively. How do you know when to go which direction, ect.? Should black really be black? How much shading should be used. I don't have a clue and it shows. The hubby one doesn't really have any shading whatsoever because I ran out of time. My dogs are black and white and I'm not sure how to show they are black, yet show the shadows. I know how I would do it in paint, but not in a quick pen sketch.Hatch in whatever way you feel comfortable with. Try hatching out in lots of different ways. I started off being quite controlled with my hatching and I now hatch with abandonment! Take a look at some of the Henry Moore sheep drawings and a drawings of the artists' hands that he did if you want to see wild hatching which is most effective. Study the way other people do it. At the end of the day you need to find the way that works for you - and then be flexible and let it change and adapt over time. A master 'conventional' hatcher is Jimmy Jim over in Artwork from Life Forum (and he sometimes posts in D&S as well) - go and take a look at his life drawings - you'll find them very instructive

5. Someone please tell me what to do about faces in quick sketches. There is no time for a likeness, but even getting them to look like a normal person is hard. I need examples I think, but most of the ones I've already looked at are much too detailed for me to hope for when sketching at coffee shops, ect. I can't even SEE the faces well enough to do that. Don't try and make them look like real faces - shade for main planes/facets of the face only. It's unlikely you can see eyes and mouths in any detail. ONLY DRAW WHAT YOU CAN SEE. If you can't see it then there's no need to draw it. Squint like mad and you will see value shapes - loosely hatch in the value shapes on your person. You'll be surprised how little information the human eye needs to be able to recognise an object. (Do you know that thing about reading words that look like gobbledygook. You can mess up the middle letters but so long as the first and the last letters are correct people can still read the word correctly if given the right context.)

You're off to a good start - keep it up!

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 03:11 PM
Oh, I forgot something else I would like help with. Indistinct shapes, like the plant. If I can't see edges, I don't know what to draw. If I'm doing a quick sketch, I can't possibly draw every leaf, even if I could see them all, which I can't. Paint is so much easier!No it's not, paint is messy!;)

If you can't see it then don't draw it.
This applies to:

contours
facial features
leaves on plants
all manner of thingsTake another look at what you can see and then do the best job you can of drawing what you can see - but don't invent anything!

Shari
06-05-2006, 03:43 PM
I am hoping to join this class, even though my drawing skills are very poor at this point. Here are two "quick" sketches for me, although I couldn't seem to get them under 8 minutes. Looking at them now, I see that I really need to loosen up and try more gestural strokes which I have never done before. I decided to overcome my fear and just post these first two of my wood stove and my conga drums, 8 min. each.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 03:52 PM
Shari - the only problem for you with joining the class is it's always better to let go of control once you've achieved it. Can I suggest you seriously consider pursuing the Drawing 101 classes as well?

That said - I think you've done very well with your two sketches.

Now what do you think you did well and what do you think you could do better?

JamieWG
06-05-2006, 05:22 PM
WOW, Katherine! What a fantastic job you did putting this together. Count me in! As you know, I paint outside and from life all the time, but you're so right that we can never do enough sketching. I'm having a tough week here, but my time should free up in another couple of days. I'll be back!

Viv, 'love the cat sketches. Animals are a great sketching subject because if you don't catch them quickly, you don't catch them at all! I'm going to try some of my new lil studio mascot. :D

Jamie

vhere
06-05-2006, 05:37 PM
thanks Jamie - looking forward to seeing the studio mascot!

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 05:41 PM
I've seen Jamie's new studio mascot - should be interesting! ;)

Glad to see you're able to join us Jamie. For people who don't know - Jamie is one of the Moderators in the Artwork from Life Forum which is where, on WC, people post work which is only done from life. It has a monthly thread for sketches from life to which I posted two not so wonderful sketches this morning!

vhere
06-05-2006, 05:45 PM
Katherine I just sent you a pm - would you take a look?

Irene Prior
06-05-2006, 05:57 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/31201-sketching-1st-assignment-So.gif

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/31201-sketching-class-chair-and-c.gif

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/31201-Sketching-Class-1st-assignm.gif

Ok I did my 3 sketches of the day. I sketched these in a 6 x9 sketchbook using 2b pencil.

The first one is of my dog Sophie napping after her walk. Light is coming from the left. I took about 5 minutes to do this sketch. This was easy to do,but do struggle with portions. Would like to get better at portions and shading.

Second sketch is of my overstuffed chair and case. This took about 5 minutes and focused more on just getting the image down. did this as a contour drawing. I find I can do contour drawings with no problem, it's when I start adding details and shading that I get into trouble. If only life was just contour all the time.:D

Thirds sketch is of Murano flower vase with birds that I got in Venice. This is probably my third attempt at doing this...I'm trying to develop into a painting. The first time I had drawn this a few days ago in cp pencil, then in watercolor, and this morning just in pencil. I think I finally got the look I'm trying to convey. Light is coming from the left. Took maybe 10 minutes to sketch and shade. I guess after drawing this 3 times it got faster with each drawing.

So what I learned is practice, draw slow to get as much detail, and I think my eyes and hand are starting to work together.

Irene:wave:

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 06:09 PM
Irene - well done for getting three sketches done today. :clap::clap::clap: And isn't it amazing how much one can get done when you focus and sketch within a time limit? :thumbsup:

I'm sure all that sketching you did in Venice has helped you to get these done today.

Keep having a go at drawing your dog - as with the flower vase you'll find it gets easier each time. Maybe try doing him as a contour drawing only?

I like the contour drawing of the chair and case - there's a fluency about your drawing which suggests to me that these are very familiar objects for you.

That's a very valuable lesson you learned doing the vase. Practice is essentially what makes the difference with drawing - those quotations at the beginning of the class are very definitely there for a reason! ;)

Well done also with your self-evaluation - it all sounded about right to me.

Maybe try something you've never ever sketched before tomorrow?

Emma Rose
06-05-2006, 06:42 PM
I'd love to join! Hope I'm good enough- I last posted a "real" sketch in the thread WDE 19 Buster study (MI??) .....
Emma

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 07:01 PM
Emma - I took a look at Buster and he certainly looks good to me.

If you (or anybody else) find that you're a bit shaky in some areas (eg perspective) then I'm assuming you will identify this as part of your self-evaluation for each assignment and seek to address it after the class.

I'm just making it clear to people that I'm not trying to teach drawing, but rather that I'm leading a class in sketching which assumes basic drawing skills.

Striver
06-05-2006, 07:15 PM
Morning all, seems we are on a roller coaster ride with the speed this is going.
Up all night with streaming nose, eyes sniffs and sneezes, in between had a go. First thoughts are i am too tight and need to loosen up or find somewhere in between. All looks crappy to me so can only improve, I hope. The shoe was supposed to be a ten minute one ended up 55 mins, lack of sleep and bleary eyes forgot the time. Just feel thick headed, more than usual that is. Dont know where to put myself now daylight is here but must strive to do more, later.
C&C more than welcome
Yucky wucky Les

gibson99
06-05-2006, 07:26 PM
I got so excited after reading Katherine's Very wise and concise paragraphs that I started drawing at my desk at work:D ! I drew as fast as I could and just let go! It was great fun and I will definitely do more of these.

I then carried this over to my lunch hour, which I take at Starbucks, where I usually draw two 15 minute sketches. Today I changed that to three 5 minute sketches.

I think what I get from these sketching times is a wonderful feeling that I am doing something that is way bigger then me.

Irene - Very Nice Indeed! you have put down a lot of information in a little time.

Striver - It doesn't at all look crappy. You have a very good line. especially the can opener.....remember, Drawing, Drawing and more Drawing.

Striver
06-05-2006, 07:29 PM
Not uploaded right, try again
Les

frida
06-05-2006, 07:31 PM
So far today I have joined, printed the Introduction and read the whole thing. From it, thinking and paying attention to how I felt, I learned something already!!!

Just to think I only have 5 minutes to sketch, makes me look like this: :eek: What does that tell me? That I need to put some effort to focus on what I am sketching, not on the timer going off at any minute! And do it many times (after all, they are only 5 minute segments), relaxing all the while, and not judging. How about that?

Anita Murphy
06-05-2006, 07:55 PM
Frida - I think you are right - I find thinking I only have five minutes is very distracting! And it is hard not to compare with a finished piece and think its not enough. I'm learning most of all how to let go. So far I have one five minute one under my belt.

mmdm
06-05-2006, 07:59 PM
Thanks so much for all the advice, Katherine. After supper, I am going to look up some of jimmy jim's stuff and also check out the sketchbook link you gave. This is all really helpful.

Regarding the plant and other indistinct objects. You say if you can't see it don't draw it. So do I just put some shading there or something? I mean, I can't see every individual leaf in the interior but I can't put nothing at all there, because I can see "plant". I realize this might be a silly question, but it is something I'm just not sure of. And what if I CAN see all the little individual leaves down inside there, but am too lazy or to short of time to draw them all in?

Mandy Valin
06-05-2006, 08:13 PM
Gibson99 I LOVE your three binders of "work" in your sketch!

Les, NICE SHOE, and I love toasted sammich maker! I have one....havent used it in a while. You've inspired me to make someyummy toasted sammiches :D

Mandy

manish013
06-05-2006, 08:33 PM
Can I join the class now? am I too late. I will try reading all old stuffs.

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 08:36 PM
Now I'm trying to get to bed on what has been a very successful first day! So these are going to be a bit on the short side

Les - I hope you feel better soon and you're doing wonderfully well considering you're under the weather.

John - well JayD has just confessed to me he's been doing the odd spot of drawing at work as well so by my reckoning I've got three of your draiwng at work! Which is wonderful!!! It's a great 'time-out' in the middle of a day. have I introduced you to Crackskullbob otheriwse known as Wally's Journal yet. If not let me know and I'll give you the link - he does Starbucks too.

Raquel - you got it in one - but you're a very intelligent lady so no more than I'd expect! One of the things that holds us back at times with making progress with our drawing is having too much time and the leisure to take a long time over a drawing. If we all went out with the plein air crowd though we'd just be sitting around with our jaws hanging open as they got on with producing a painting of something that changes with the weather/sun etc within a relatively short space of time. Loosening up means you see a whole new side of your drawing which you didn't know existed!

Melisa - focus on the big shapes and the key values and try not to be distracted by detail. The problem with drawing from photographs is that you get a hangover in terms of what you expect to see when drawing from life. People used to drawing from photographs expect to see all aspects at the same level of resolution whereas, in reality, when we look at something in real life our focus tends to make things on the periphery of our vision more under-stated and less important.

Hi Alde - planning to join the class?

(PS I'd really appreciate it if people could use the "Insert Image" icon to post their images as I can then see them in the thread when I scroll down.)

Katherine T
06-05-2006, 08:47 PM
And I think with Emma we have now have more than 20 students taking this class. :thumbsup::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

I hope the "Class Monitors" can help the newbies out in terms of finding their way around the Forum generally and that we can keep JayD's pigtail pulling under control!

Judi1957
06-05-2006, 08:59 PM
If anyone has any questions navigating around to other Classes, etc-feel free to pm me!:) I am here to lend a hand.

Great day One Katherine!:clap: :clap::clap: :thumbsup:

Mandy Valin
06-05-2006, 10:43 PM
Hello Katherine, everyone!
I do plan to join the class in fact, I already have my first assignment ready :eek:

I'm doing most of my sketches in pen, for one because they scan in better, also I find it easier to sketch fast because I don't have to work as hard to get darker values as I do with pencil.

I did three 5 min sketches of my chair, a doorway, and part of my computer desk.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-5minchair.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-5mindesk.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-5mindoor.jpg

Straight lines have never been my forte...So my doorway is a little groovy lol :lol:

Here are some under 5 min sketches of random objects on my desk

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-staplerpostitmouse.jpg

This one was ment to be 10 minutes but ended up being closer to 8

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-8minwindow.jpg

Here is my 15 minute sketch, the doorway into my kitchen
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-15mincorner.jpg

And my 20 minute, a sketch of one of my aquariums

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2006/10914-20minfishtank.jpg

Tomorrow hopefully I can do some of the longer half hour and hour sketches, I hope outside ;) It was rainy today so I was stuck inside. I am hoping to go to the pool behind my apartment building and sketch there (if theres no one around that is hehe)

G'night!

Mandy

JayD
06-05-2006, 11:28 PM
Attention, everyone--some of you may know this already but PLEASE be sure to stop by the yearbook thread and post a picture of yourself--its how we archive Basic 101 and Basic 102 participants. Top Kat this means you too!!!:evil:

ALSO, DONT FORGET TO RATE TOP KAT'S THREAD--LET HER KNOW THAT YOU APPRECIATE THE HARD WORK AND PLANNING THAT WENT INTO THIS CLASS!!!

Melisa, I have seen some of your work in the past and your drawing is quite acomplished as is your craft work. I would like to reccomend that you check out the Basic 101 Textbook called How to Draw What You See by Rudy De Reyna. It's a cant miss explanation of breaking objects down into their base geometric components.

I am sorry that the early sketching class did not meet your needs but we were just putting everything together so some parts were indeed sketchy. As a whole, we have produced some tremendous results from the Basic 101 series. Anyway, do check out the book if you get the time.

ArtyLady
06-06-2006, 01:33 AM
Some great work here and wonderful ideas too! I am in the middle of doing some of my sketches and will post shortly.

Robin Neudorfer
06-06-2006, 02:23 AM
I did some last night and tonight.
I must say I am rusty at the quick sketches. However I did find that the sketchbook inhibited my drawing quickly. I like to use a lot of my arm when quickly drawing and was running into the edges before I was able to take off.
#1and 2 - 5 min.more or less - in a ? kind of sketchbook it has a black cover with white paper.
#3 - 5 min. in the same notebook, with a Copic Brushtip pen
#4 - 10 min. in a moleskine with a 0.2 Copic pen
#4 - 15 min. in a moleskine with a 0.2 Copic pen

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 02:54 AM
Thanks Judy!

I'm not going to be around all of today as I was yesterday (first day and all that) as I'm out getting my new varifocals lens fixed. Which brings me to a relevant matter for all those who wear glasses for distance or reading or both.

When you're sketching from life, you're going to have to work out how to get to grips with the glasses issue. When I just needed reading glasses I used to have them perched on the end of my nose so I could see over them as I looked up at the scene and then see through them as I looked down to my paper. Then when I needed both distance and reading it nearly drove me crackers until I got my varifocals. If you've not quite reached that stage yet then have a good look at the scene with the distance glasses on and then take them off and perch your reading glasses on the end of your nose.

And remember some of the greatest artists couldn't see very well at all! I know at least one professional artist (who needs glasses for distances only) who always paints with his glasses off so he doesn't get distracted by the detail! :D

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 03:42 AM
One other thing (following a comment I saw some where on the forum) quickie sketches from photos don't count for the purposes of this class. Photos flatten depth and consequently make it easier to draw - and at the same time you don't get to grips with recession.

So bottom line - no photos are being used in this class.

BTW I can usually tell when a drawing is from life and when it's done using a reference image! ;)

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 04:01 AM
Hello Katherine, everyone!
I do plan to join the class in fact, I already have my first assignment ready :eek:

I'm doing most of my sketches in pen, for one because they scan in better, also I find it easier to sketch fast because I don't have to work as hard to get darker values as I do with pencil..........I did three 5 min sketches of my chair, a doorway, and part of my computer desk..........Straight lines have never been my forte...So my doorway is a little groovy lol :lol:

Here are some under 5 min sketches of random objects on my desk / This one was ment to be 10 minutes but ended up being closer to 8 / Here is my 15 minute sketch, the doorway into my kitchen. And my 20 minute, a sketch of one of my aquariums

Tomorrow hopefully I can do some of the longer half hour and hour sketches, I hope outside ;) It was rainy today so I was stuck inside. I am hoping to go to the pool behind my apartment building and sketch there (if theres no one around that is hehe)

G'night!

MandyMandy - well done :clap::clap::clap::clap:a very good start indeed. Exemplary even!

Note folks that Mandy has not gone for the 'picturesque' but rather for everyday and her immediate environment. She has also spotted a weakness in her drawing (her straight lines) which she can keep an eye on when she sketches outside.

Mandy - I have a terrible tendency for all my long verticals to lean. I discovered a very neat trick when I was trying to sketch great big enormous columns in the interior of St Paul's Cathedral. I took a ruler with me and drew very faint guideline verticals on the page. These were not the verticals for the columns - which I hand drew - but they kept my eye 'seeing straight' while I drew the columns. It worked a treat!

That's very true about using a pen - you get good solid darks that much faster. You can do the same thing with soft graphite - but you'll also probably get a messy page which won't scan properly until you clean up and restore some highlights.

Mandy - I'm very impressed by the good sense of recession you're achieving through the combination of simple outline and then working through the value. changes. And you're getting a very nice sense of form with your simple objects as well.

Try tackling something with really dark values and see what that does to your value shapes. Look back at my comment about the big blur.

I'm looking forward to seeing you move on to Assignment 2 - but don't forget that while you're still learning to sketch you can get a huge benefit from carrying on with doing quickie sketches everyday.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 04:44 AM
Note to the Class generally: People - everybody is going to come to the class with different levels of drawing skill and some will move through it quicker than others. This is not any sort of race and nobody gets to become an expert sketcher by doing one lesson. All we're doing here is trying to learn some of the things which make it easier for people to sketch. Actually learning how to sketch takes lots and lots of practice - and getting into good habits now (daily quickies for example) is part of the way you can get your practice in.

Also - when you're doing quickies do try experimenting with different media and different ways of making marks. Remember - nothing has to be perfect - you are not doing a finished work.

Take a look at Van Gogh's drawings (in the links) if you want to see somebody who was a complete master at mark-making. Look at what Rembrandt also got up to with a pen and ink.

The quickie sketches start to open up the scope of your drawing practice and will provide you with some insight as to what you like doing and what you don't, what you like to draw with - and what you like to draw on.

Don't forget to keep trying different surfaces. If you find something you really like then go and write about it in the "What is your favourite sketchbook" thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=350772) in the main D&S Forum. You can also learn from what other people have already written about sketchbooks they have used.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 05:03 AM
I did some last night and tonight.
I must say I am rusty at the quick sketches. However I did find that the sketchbook inhibited my drawing quickly. I like to use a lot of my arm when quickly drawing and was running into the edges before I was able to take off.
Robin - can you use the image uploader icon please. If you use the attachment function the images disappear from the previous posts which can be seen when I scroll down.

Same goes for everybody - please use the image uploader icon and then I don't have to switch back and too between two threads when commenting.

Sometimes drawing smaller or in a sketchbook means we learn different things about how we draw or can draw. I used to do enormous drawings and it felt very strange when I started doing smaller ones. The thing I found is that small sketches tend to work better if you focus on one thing - like your bag or the tree - and then the 'running out of space' problem stops being such a problem.

I think we ought to ban Robin from doing any buildings or anything involving perspective - you're just too good at it! :D

Joking aside, when drawing from life, it's always good to start with things you know before moving on to drawing things which challenge us more.

The big thing with quickies is to learn how to simplify as Robin shows us in her sketches. I love your tree Robin. Can everybody see that despite no detail whatsoever in terms of individual leaves, we know it's a tree because the contour drawing is so good. And even when drawing quickly, you can still draw accurately as Robin has done here.

Anita Murphy
06-06-2006, 06:35 AM
I've only got one 5 minuter to show for now - got tied up with finishing a portrait......

(I'm a little confused as to which image thingy you want us to use - the icon or the manage attachments?)

The chair was 5 minutes the table an extra 1.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 06:44 AM
Nice one Anita

It's which ever one you didn't use as your image is not showing up when I scroll down when writing my response.

I always use the little yellow icon just above the window I write my reply in (which looks like a mountain against a yellow sky and says 'insert image' when you hover over it) and that always brings up my images in the threads (I think!).

Anyway - Alde, Irene and mmdm are doing it right!:) I can see all of their images when I scroll down.

Anita Murphy
06-06-2006, 07:04 AM
I knew it would be the one I didn't use! I always use the little icon too but you threw me into a quandary!! :confused: - doesn't take much at this time of the morning!

kennychaffin
06-06-2006, 07:15 AM
Okay, this is all I had time for a 7 min sketch of the camera that took this pic:



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2006/82568-7-min-sketch-cameraS.jpg

KAC

IslanderNL
06-06-2006, 08:04 AM
You've provided a surfeit of information here Katherine. Thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge and research with us.

I'm still reading and rereading it and this morning did a sketch of the barn waking up. One of the ponies was cranky with the ducks being in her way and she was either talking to them in no uncertain terms or getting ready to drop kick them. :)

This took about 4 minutes to draw.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2006/67422-horse__ducks.jpg

Mandy Valin
06-06-2006, 08:14 AM
Kenny--is that a digital rebel? It looks just like the camera i have :)

Jeanette-- I love your cranky pony! And especially the one duck in between the first duck and the pony.

mmdm
06-06-2006, 08:15 AM
Melisa, I have seen some of your work in the past and your drawing is quite acomplished as is your craft work. I would like to reccomend that you check out the Basic 101 Textbook called How to Draw What You See by Rudy De Reyna. It's a cant miss explanation of breaking objects down into their base geometric components.

I am sorry that the early sketching class did not meet your needs but we were just putting everything together so some parts were indeed sketchy. As a whole, we have produced some tremendous results from the Basic 101 series. Anyway, do check out the book if you get the time.

Thanks, Jay! I've put it on my Amazon wish list and will try to get it soon. I agree that you've gotten tremendous results from the 101 classes. I've been going through them, reading and trying out some of the lessons, and though I haven't posted them (only because I came across them so late) I have learned a lot. The perspective classes, particularly, were very helpful. I still have a few to go through. The glass class looks interesting. So much to learn. And I've been recommending the classes to other people, too. So no need to apologize for any sketchiness in the early classes. They are getting easier to read and follow as it goes along, I've noticed. These are such a great idea and I love that they are remaining up after their 2 weeks so people who are late finding them, like me, can still benefit.

kennychaffin
06-06-2006, 08:37 AM
Kenny--is that a digital rebel? It looks just like the camera i have :)

Jeanette-- I love your cranky pony! And especially the one duck in between the first duck and the pony.

Alde, close, it's a Canon 20D but not a very good likeness :)

KAC

JayD
06-06-2006, 08:39 AM
Hi, Melisa--The classes came about in an interesting way--I came her to learn to draw and I became enamoured of colored pencil so I became a cp groupie but my drawing skills were so limited that I needed lessons and went over here to the D&S forum and hung around. Someone mentioned starting a class and it never happened and I wanted that class so I called Watson Guptil, obtained permission to use their book and started my own classes and learned as I went--that is why these groups are so participatory--you learn from the teacher but you also learn from your peers--its a comfort zone so to speak. The sketching class was certainly not one of our finer efforts--never offer a sketching class in the middle of winter. Anyway, my goal was to eventually evolve the classes toward what you see today with strong notables teaching the class. Stick around because there is a LOT more of these 102 classes already lined up on the schedule.

Dont forget to post your picture in the yearbook. By the way, we do a lot silly things here like field trips and yearbooks but these classes are a lot about fun, spirit and peer comfort--soak em in and enjoy!

mhimeswc
06-06-2006, 08:42 AM
Hi. I "dropped out" of Drawing 101 at about lesson 30 - back around Thanksgiving when I developed bronchitis that lasted thru Christmas and beyond. I intend to start back there and do my pen stippling exercise, but I would really like to get better at outdoor sketching, and I think this class would work better if I do it now with the group, rather than later. So if it's okay, I'd like to start here today also. As I type this I'm printing the instructions for the first two assignments. I'll post my sketches soon.

Michelle

mmdm
06-06-2006, 08:59 AM
Jay - That's fantastic! The classes have certainly caught on. I'd been away from WC for about a year when someone mentioned the classes recently and I came back to check it out. This seems like the perfect kind of thing to have here at WC. Thanks for being such a go-getter. We are all benefitting from it. I don't think I have any recent photos (not an accident) but I'll see about getting DH to snap one for the yearbook.

gibson99
06-06-2006, 09:27 AM
Katherine - This is a lovely thread. I am having so much fun and learning so much. I started out pretty shy about drawing in public, but now it seems so easy after doing it for a while. I would like very much to see someone elses Starbucks drawing. Thankyou.

mmdm
06-06-2006, 10:15 AM
Does anyone know why I don't get the Mentor and Merit buttons on this thread? I can't say I fully understand how they work, but I've noticed I get them in the other D & S forums, but not here. I wanted to give Katherine a mentor point, if only I could figure it all out. :)

robynsin
06-06-2006, 10:51 AM
Ducking into class late - but delighted that I was able to start a new sketchbook today and resisted warming up on scraps of paper - it shows, but I have overcome the first obstacle. I'm posting the lot, not because they are good but because they are a beginning and I'll improve. Great class Katherine - many thanks for your generosity.

ciao
robyn

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/43096-66219-DSC027311.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/43096-66219-DSC027341.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/43096-66219-DSC027351.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/43096-66219-DSC027361.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/43096-66219-DSC027371.jpg

All 2B .5 mm mechanical pencil in 7" x 4.4" 'Bushey' Sketch Book except kettle which is fountain pen on copy paper.

Judi1957
06-06-2006, 12:27 PM
Michelle! Great to have you back!!!!!:clap: :clap: :clap:

mmdm
06-06-2006, 12:49 PM
I haven't commented on anyone's sketches, because I don't know enough about it myself, but I have to tell Robyn how much I like your sleeping dog sketch. It is amazing how those few little lines are enough to make me want to bend down and scratch his sleeping head.

robynsin
06-06-2006, 01:24 PM
Melisa - Thank you. You've made my day. Said dog usually sleeps for hours under the table. As soon as I started to sketch him he woke and exited the room. Everyone's a critic!:lol:

Mary Woodul
06-06-2006, 01:51 PM
Katherine, I don't know what I'm doing because I don't know how to sketch. The first three are 5 min. and I can't believe I couldn't go farther in five minutes. The couch is 10 min. All with pigment liner on Canson Sketchbook.

pallavi
06-06-2006, 02:22 PM
Hi Kathrine,
I read this article and thought I would really like to try it.I was not able to complete all the classes from the basic 101 series.I have always wanted to sketch and so I would like to give it a try.
This is my first ever sketch.After completing it I came to understand why everybody says sketching from real life is different from sketching from a photo.I really liked the experience. I did not put any time limit ,as this was my first time but i did not use any eraser and I did not bother myself with a lot of details.the whole sketch was finished in about 7 min.
The difficulty I encoutered:
1. I had tough time keeping the perspective correct.
2. I was not able to draw the tree just below the roof correctly.
3. The tree appears to be wrong because I dont know how to establish shadows and highlights on a tree.Even my marks dictionary is non existent.
4. Just near the road there were some rocks and foilage or you can call them bushes. I was not able to provide distinction between rocks and those foilage. Even those foilage seems to mix up with the tree.
5. The line which is circled is the line I think should be the actual place where the far end of the railing should be.the far end of railing is going away from the building .Will you please tell if i am right in my thinking or not.

If you think I can join this class after this debacle then I would dare to sketch tomorrow again
rest is fine
bye
pal

mmdm
06-06-2006, 02:51 PM
I thought I'd try lesson 2 today and didn't have much success but did learn a couple of things. First of all, go out before the temperature goes about 90 degrees F, because the dogs are already occupying the only shady spot. I took my sketchbook, pen, pencil, and a 4x6 viewfinder which I didn't use. I decided to use the pencil instead of the pen so I could smudge for the black of the dogs, shadows but forgot to bring anything to smudge with and had to use my finger, so I kept the shading very light.

Everything in my yard was dead and I coudn't find anything to sketch so I just tried the dogs again. Even when I think they are asleep, they move as soon as I start sketching. I found that if I waited, they sometimes went back close enough to the same position to continue, but most of the time not. I'm pleased with the top one. It looks like Bogart. The rest are pretty bad. They were in complete shade, so there really weren't any shadows. I also forgot my watch, so I could at least time these, because I never wear one. I am going to try to find time to go to the park tomorrow and try again and I will be better prepared.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2006/9614-bssketches3.jpg

Mandy Valin
06-06-2006, 03:45 PM
Cute cute doggies melisa :D Is he a boston terrrier?

jmfletch
06-06-2006, 03:58 PM
Is it just me or is anyone else having problems with the text in the posts on this page not wrapping??? Sure makes reading a pain in the @#$#$$#.

The earlier pages are fine and other forums ...it is just this page ( I am using 40 posts per page.)

:confused: :confused: :mad: :confused: :confused:
Joe

mmdm
06-06-2006, 04:01 PM
Cute cute doggies melisa :D Is he a boston terrrier?

Thank you. Yes, actually it is 2 different Bostons. Bogie and Sophie. Only Sophie is extremely hyper and I can't get a good likeness because she moves constantly.


Joe - The text is wrapping properly for me.

Mary Woodul
06-06-2006, 04:46 PM
Joe, it isn't for me. It is as wide as my screen and I have to move the page to read it!:( I have it set for forty pages also.

vhere
06-06-2006, 05:40 PM
it's gone wide because there's a really large image a few posts above



That sketch wasn't so desperately awful pallavi - it's just practice practice practice and learning to look really hard and look constantly, never guessing where things are but looking hard.

When you are putting the elements of the drawing together constantly compare where one part comes compared with another - level? below? above? etc and using the size of one element compare it with the distances elsewhere for instance with a face take an eye as a measure and decide how many eyes long the nose is, where do the corners of the mouth come in line with the eye? where does the ear come compared to the eye etc etc etc

You will improve if you practice :) and draw from life regularly.

Striver
06-06-2006, 05:45 PM
Morning all.
I have a problem, seems alternate pages go extra wide, I have to scroll sideways to read them, over double the size more like three page widths. Annoying. If anyone can tell how to fix that, great. It has happened before and fixed itself eventually.
Slept thro the day yesterday, feeling awful, yucky cold but it's drying up now, not many sneezes.
Regards
Les

Striver
06-06-2006, 05:51 PM
Just read previous post and it makes sense about large images. Thought wc only accepted 500 x 600 pixels and other's could not get thro? Any way to fix the size people.
Les

vhere
06-06-2006, 05:55 PM
if they are hosted elsewhere and the link pasted I think they can get through - the filters cut the size down if you load direct from your hard drive.

Mary Woodul
06-06-2006, 06:11 PM
Can someone tell me where the large image is please? Mine, that I had posted with the image uploader were side by side but they were two seprate images. I have deleted those and used the manage attachments. I see that Robynsin has uploaded with the uploader also and hers also uploaded side by side. Is that the one you are talking about?

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 06:37 PM
Right folks - back much later than expected as we had a terrible time getting my varifocals right.:eek: In the end it turned out they had somehow managed to change the shape of the frames which made everything blurry at the sides! Three hours later it was sorted!:rolleyes:

Now who's not doing their self-evaluation? :confused:;) It's really important as you start to do more work on your own outside. You need to be able to look very objectively at your work - while you work - and see what's wrong with it so you can work out to make a correction and produce a better sketch. Remember, most sketches you do outside and/or in public are going to be 'task and finish' affairs - having a go the next day isn't always going to be an option. So use your time doing quickies to start developing your skills in self-assessment.

The main thing, as has been commented on, is that sketching for real isn't the same as drawing from a photo so there are bound to be lots of imperfections until you become more expert. Don't worry about the mistakes you make. Do worry about not spotting them! :);)

Here's some ways of checking your drawing skills:
Put your work at a little distance so that it becomes "thumbnail" size. Somehow going down very small instantly makes any bad errors instantly apparent.
try using a mirror. Stand with your back to your work and look at it using the mirror so that you see it in reverse - again errors will jump out at you.
check whether your value pattern enables you to 'read' the sketch. Does it make sense when you can't see the detail?
check whether you're managing to get the full range of values into the sketch - or whether you're skipping the darks. Have you worked out a way of getting a good dark yet?
did you find the eye level? Do your perspective lines make sense in terms of the eye line?
check whether you get the overall proportions about right. When working fast you tend to do it by eye more. Just how good is you eye at getting it right? Or are you getting good at using your pencil to measure?
did you draw things you couldn't see - because you thought you ought to?Reviewing how you work when drawing quickly

Who's coping OK with the time constraints? 'Difficult but doable' or 'difficult and impossible'? Anybody else finding it difficult?

What have you done to make it easier for yourself to draw within the time limits?

If you are finding it difficult here's a few things to think about:
think about how much of the challenge for you is the need to make a perfect picture. Give yourself permission to deliver less than your best (ie what you can do when drawing in a different context)
do you have a problem knowing where to start? If you do then just stare at the subject and don't make a mark at all.
Just let your eyes move about the subject finding a way to draw it.
Mentally try to place your subject on the paper - find the centre on the vertical axis and then find it again on the horizontal axis.
identify which bits must be drawn to make sense of it - and which bits might be left out or understated because they're just less important
Look at all the edges - can you see them all or are some of them blurred? Does any bit of the subject merge with the background? Have any of your drawings got connections between the background context and the subject?
just keep practising short ones until it starts to feel a more relaxed process.Reviewing your choice of drawing instrument and support

Also take some time out to think about whether your basic equipment is doing the job you want it to.
have you tried different drawing instruments?
have you tried different paper?
which work best for you when drawing more quickly?
which produces the most interesting marks?
which produces the best range of values?OK - lots of things to think about. Do make sure you give us a self-assessment of your work.

Remember your experience may give reassurance to others - or might make somebody realise that your experience was theirs too even if they hadn't realised it before.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 06:44 PM
Kenny - that's an awful lot of detail for 7 minutes. Well done! :thumbsup:

Judging by your comments it sounds as if you think you could do better. How about if you focused more on the overall shape and seeing whether or not line contour drawing is something that feels comfortable for you?

Could you draw it without lifting your pencil off the page and get it right. A bit like Robyn's tree..........

I'd also like to see another version (longer!) which places the camera within some sort of context

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 06:48 PM
Jeanette - that is a totally stunning sketch for 4 minutes. You have ducks and a horse with attitude!!! :thumbsup::D What is so good though is that this sketch tells a story and has for feeling. and all in 4 minutes!

Give yourself a very big pat on the back.:clap::clap::clap:

How could you improve it? ;)

kwint
06-06-2006, 06:49 PM
Thanks for starting this class, Katherine.
I picked one of my favorite subjects that usually forces me to draw quickly because she doesn't stay still for long. She humored me with the long pose of 15 minutes. I fiddled around with patterns in her bed for a minute or so, but I'd say I was done with the dog parts in about 14.

The page with the smaller heads was done in about 20 min, so I'd say each one was about a 5 minute sketch. These were both sketched in my Cahier Moleskine - approx. 7" x 10"

What I learned: It's hard to speed sketch using a Micron 005 pen. I probably could have done a better job had I used a 4B or 6B pencil, or even my 2B mechanical which glides across the paper smoothly. At any rate, I enjoyed the experience.

I've posted these drawings larger, on my blog as well:
http://karenwinters.com/kblog/2006/06/06/dog-on-the-run/

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 06:50 PM
:wave: Hi Michelle - I don't know if we've met before but I don't think so. I'm glad you're over your bronchitis (nasty!) and able to take part.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 06:59 PM
:wave:Hi Karen!!!

Folks - I'm going to dip out of the order of responses to introduce you to Karen Winters who is a STAR SKETCHER! :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

As you might be able to tell from her rather beautiful quickie sketches of her dog. I love the annotations! :)

Karen is also one of the people whose blog I listed in the reference section as worth looking at. She's particularly expert at wielding her watercolours as well as a pen. More importantly she is a huge supporter of people who use sketchbooks as working documents and is a fount of knowledge on the subject! And she's completely in love with sketching outside and in public.

Karen - a very big and warm welcome to the forum and to this classroom and please feel free to chip in with what you've learned over time from your experiences of sketching.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 07:15 PM
John - the individual who sketches in Starbucks has had various names during the incarnation of his blog and its recent reincarnation. I know him as Wally. This is the address of his blog http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/

Here are some examples of his Starbucks series

Starbubbas (http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/2006/5/16/starbubbas.html)
I couldn't stay away (http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/2006/5/2/i-couldnt-stay-away.html)
I know, I know (http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/2006/5/1/i-know-i-know.html)He also does:

very accomplished line drawings in pen and ink of scenes around Norfolk Virginia where he's based (although that might just be a state secret;)) such as this one (http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/2006/5/29/new-cruise-terminal.html) ,
rather nice composite drawings which I keep encouraging him to do more of - such as this one (http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/2006/5/19/what-i-see-five.html)
some 'interesting' life drawings (eg of Mike the Model (http://crackskullbob.squarespace.com/journal/2006/5/24/figure-drawing-group-4.html) - not for the faint hearted!:eek: )
and an occasional 'edgy' illustration when he starts playing with photoshop.He posted 61 sketches / illustrations to his blog in May!

BTW he lurves comments!

kwint
06-06-2006, 07:16 PM
Thanks for the very kind (blush) welcome, Katherine. Your assignment gave me some grist for my blog today, and I'm hoping that some of my readers will come and join your information-and-inspiration-packed class.

I forgot to mention before, but I think that the single most useful bit that helps me with accuracy is "eye-balling" distances and angles when drawing quickly. For example, I may start drawing Ripley's nose and then place two little dots to set the inner corners of her eyes.Then I'll draw her eyes, and sight the ears off of that. I am also very keen on drawing negative spaces whenever given the opportunity.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 07:41 PM
Ciao Robyn

Well done for producing so many sketches :thumbsup:

A very economical and brief sketch of your dog but I have to agree with Melisa - you've made him very strokeable. :)

That 10 minute one of your terrace is also very impressive - you managed to get so much done!

I think what I want to know now is what do you think you did well, what can be improved and what have you learned.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 07:46 PM
Mary - could you please use the image icon to upload images in future so I can see your sketches when I scroll down while replying.

(PS If I miss anybody out that's why!)

Mary - I wouldn't worry about your sketches - you're doing fine.

I suspect the pen and ink is making you go more slowly - but it's really worth mastering quick sketching in pen and ink - it really trains the eye the more you do. First thing I do every time I go away is make myself do a long and complicated pen and ink sketch because it's the only guaranteed way of "getting my eye in" fast.

Just keep at it - and don't forget your self-assessment! :)

Striver
06-06-2006, 07:46 PM
Just not in the mood tho trying, B/cold.
Tried to do some 10 min ones. Please feel free to comment. Posted to encourage those like myself (if Any) who need encouragement to sketch live. Photo's are already framed so easier to copy. I am much better at that.
What have I learned. pick a subject you think can be done in the time frame. The radiator could, still found I had to speed up and lost more accuracy, so what.
The pot plant, for me more a 30 min or more. thought it was ambitious for a 10 min one.
Started on the pot and did not start low enough for foilage, it is three times taller than shown. Did not have brain in gear, do know better.
I stopped on the ten min mark , could have made it a longer one but am under the weather. More like the flu not a cold am acheing all over.
Enough, comments most welcome especially hints on foilage. One thing I wondered, whether to try to draw the foilage as i saw it, or after a while to make my own up. Yup not drawing what I see then. Your thoughts on foilage drawing appreciated.
Yucky Wucky Les

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 07:53 PM
:wave:Hi Pal - you get the gold star for the best self-assessment of today that I've seen. That's a really good analysis of your sketch and what you think you could improve.

You also got some really good advice from Viv (:wave:Hi Viv - what was the response from the gallery?) and practice, practice, practice is definitely the way to improve when it comes to sketching - there is no fast route to doing well.

You also look like you had a very difficult angle to cope with which would have challenged a lot of good sketchers. Just keep in mind when doing scenes outside that you need to get your verticals and horizontals and their relative positions established - and most particularly how they relate to the eyeline.

How about doing Assignment 1 tomorrow and trying some quickie sketches of maybe some simpler things around your home (or workplace)?

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 08:06 PM
Melisa - you have made one of the big discoveries about sketching - midday is not a good time to sketch. The sun is overhead and the shadows are awful. Much nicer shadow shapes before mid morning and late afternoon/early evening.

I think you could usefully try some more quickies. At the moment most of what you've drawn has been isolated objects but when you get outside and start sketching for real you'll have to focus on integrating your focal point (dog or whatever) into its context.

Try doing some quickies where you focus on getting the whole picture. Similar to the what Robyn did with her first sketch when she draw a corridor/hall. Start to practice also finding the edge of a picture you're going to sketch and getting your subject on the page and in the 'frame'.

Also have a go at practising the full range of values.

Or will you be be setting your alarm clock for tomorrow morning's sketching outside?;)

Right - the lens has just dropped out of my new computer glasses so i'm off to bed and will respond to any other sketches posted in the morning. Nightie night!

Mary Woodul
06-06-2006, 08:15 PM
Katherine, thank you! I am sorry but I completely forgot the assessment. I have to read over everything again because you have given us such valuable information, it is worth studying.

I had used the image uploader but I guess it should be done in individual post because they uploaded side by side like robynsin's and I think that is what caused the wide page.

Katherine T
06-06-2006, 08:18 PM
Mary if you upload each one individually - and then after each upload press the space bar so that there is at least one space inbetween each upload you shouldn't have a problem.

Mind you I think computers get tempremental in hot weather!

Mary Woodul
06-06-2006, 08:48 PM
Thank you Katherine, you are surely right because I didn't press the space bar. I'll keep that in mind.:)

mmdm
06-06-2006, 09:02 PM
OK, I will work on that "whole picture in the frame" thing tomorrow, as well as values. Don't get a lot of light and shadow here in the house, except icky overhead lightbulb light, but I'll see what I can do. I did go back out this evening. DH was watering the blueberry bushes and I thought I might try some quick sketches of that, but the mosquitos were just horrible and ran me back in. You really can't go out in the late part of the day here in Louisiana, unless you are one of those people that bugs don't like. I'm not one of those people. :)

I think there is a place on the options page of your control panel where you can set it to show attachment images inline instead of as thumbnails. You might want to try that so you don't have to keep reminding everyone to use the image uploader. I think if they are inline, they will still show when you scroll the page.

Robin Neudorfer
06-06-2006, 09:10 PM
Kenny - A bit like Robyn's tree..........

Not to confuse the group there is a Robin and a Robyn.
I won't bother posting my few again, but next time I will post them larger for you Katherine. I trained my class to use thumbnails so I could compare side by side.
Great sketches all around.

mhimeswc
06-06-2006, 09:20 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2006/20035-shoe.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2006/20035-watch.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2006/20035-timing.jpg

I was out most of the day, but I did put a pencil in my hand for a few 5 minute sketches. The first ones I tried were of my son's truck out my living room window. Both times I started it I got a few lines down and my phone rang. By the time I was finished with my second call, it was too dark to see the truck. I don't think 5 minutes would have been enough anyway. Will try it tomorrow with a longer sketch.

So now I'm sitting on the sofa with my feet stretched out, right foot crossed over left. However, I only drew the right one. The second sketch is my watch which I was using to time my sketches. The third is me holding the watch so I could sketch my hand and time myself at the same time.

Well, you can see that I'm always tentative when I start a sketch. I can eventually produce a clean, relatively accurate drawing given enough time, but I kind of fiddle with getting the initial sketch down. I know I shouldn't do this on a quickie, but I do it anyway.

My foot looks too narrow - after all, I wear a Wide in a shoe. I think my foot was tilted more than my sketch would indicate. I took so long on the sole of the shoe that I barely had time to scribble the laces in.

Watch - I'm a little rusty on elipses - actually, I think I flunked that part in 101. I'll have to look for more things with elipses to sketch.

Hand - it was an awkward pose but I think I came close.

I know I don't draw enough. I usually put down just enough to get approximate shapes for my watercolors.

I will try a few more 5 minute ones, and do some longer poses tomorrow.

Michelle

Mary Woodul
06-06-2006, 11:03 PM
Folks - I'm going to dip out of the order of responses to introduce you to Karen Winters who is a STAR SKETCHER!


Karen welcome to the D/S forum and to the class. Wonderful sketches and thank you for sharing them with us.

Striver
06-07-2006, 01:07 AM
Yes welcome Karen, and please, I noted your comments about dot's alongside the nose. Anymore hints/tips will be appreciated.
Cheers
Les

kwint
06-07-2006, 01:32 AM
Mary and Les ... thanks for the warm welcome. I have been in "watercolor" mode so much this year (by intention) that I have rather let my drawing practice take a back seat. It's hard to put everything on the front burner all at once! I did some public sketching when we walked to our polling place today (election day in several US states.) My stops included the veterinarian's office, a plant nursery, a pizza joint and a big hole in the street. Minutes of drawing were spent at each pausing place and I have to say the resulting page was rather eclectic- looking. I'll probably scan it for my blog tomorrow. I didn't write down the times of each stop though but I'm guessing about 20 min. of drawing, all told.

robynsin
06-07-2006, 02:59 AM
HELP! Can someone please tell me how I can remove (or if not, do it for me) the sketches I posted side by side and caused everyone problems with the width of their screens. I'm terribly sorry - won't happen again.

ciao
robyn

Robin Neudorfer
06-07-2006, 03:13 AM
Forgot to pull out my sketchbook while plein air painting today. Captured a few though. On the longer side. Though not blind, they are still considered contour, as I am not spending any time shading.
This first one was done this morning while waiting for my friends. The section of the treebranch was above me. I really used the concept of negative drawing here. This is between a 15 - 30 min sketch. I don't ever look.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/30341-sketch_6:6:06_tree_leaves.jpg Next, are a few people I have drawn from my night class. I would say about 3 min before they moved. I don't like to do quick studies with these pens, and I forgot my pencil. So I studied the profile, and would like to be able to capture the likeness, without questioning myslef.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/30341-Sketch_6:6:06.jpg
This is a tray in my desk drawer.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/30341-sketch_6:6:06_-_3.jpg

If there is anyone that does not understand this method of contour sketching, please feel friend to say so. I would be delighted to demonstrate it
So tired here , my sentences are not makin sense.

IslanderNL
06-07-2006, 04:50 AM
I am guilty of not doing a self assessment of my first sketch of the horse and ducks, so I will now.

In looking at it, I can see that the proportions of the horse is wrong. She is foreshortened but I've made her legs far too short, making the ducks look larger than they should be and throwing the goose on the right out as well.

What I did learn is that its easier than I thought to capture moving animals, although some memory is involved in what you've committed to paper as they change position. If I can get the original lines down to indicate form, the rest can be filled in (tone, detail) as the animal moves about.

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 05:37 AM
I think there is a place on the options page of your control panel where you can set it to show attachment images inline instead of as thumbnails. You might want to try that so you don't have to keep reminding everyone to use the image uploader. I think if they are inline, they will still show when you scroll the page.Thanks Melissa - but that particular facility relates to normal viewing while looking at the boards rather than when you are writing a comment.

What I'm referring to is the way in which previous posts are displayed below the window in which you write your post (have a look next time you post).

If you scroll down while commenting - you can always see the images of people who used the little icon - but not those where people have used the attachment facility. It just makes it an awful lot easier for people commenting - otherwise I have to have same thread open twice. That's why the WC site recommends the use of the icon / upload facility (there's a sticky thread about it somewhere isn't there?)

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 05:51 AM
I am guilty of not doing a self assessment of my first sketch of the horse and ducks, so I will now.

In looking at it, I can see that the proportions of the horse is wrong. She is foreshortened but I've made her legs far too short, making the ducks look larger than they should be and throwing the goose on the right out as well.

What I did learn is that its easier than I thought to capture moving animals, although some memory is involved in what you've committed to paper as they change position. If I can get the original lines down to indicate form, the rest can be filled in (tone, detail) as the animal moves about.Jeanette - thanks! :thumbsup:

That's a great analysis as well. :clap::clap::clap: I hope everybody will take lots of encouragement from your review of drawing animals - it really is a lot easier than it looks, albeit proportions sometimes get a bit 'wonky' It took me a bit of time to figure out that it works better if the approach adopted is

guidelines first - to hang the sketch on
then get the values right as they're movingI have also found that animals very often have a pattern of movements so that if you watch them first you can work out which are the characteristic movenents and then it's just a question of working which one to do. Whenever they move I switch to sketching another bit before they come back to the posture I'm drawing. Makes sketching a bit disjointed but it makes drawing animals from life an awful lot easier and not the impossible proposition that many people imagine.

I'm looking forward to your next one Jeanette! Are you thinking about trying any instruments or media that you don't normally use?

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 05:53 AM
Robin - sorry for the mispelling - it was late at night for me when I did it! :o

You do great contour drawings - love them. :thumbsup: Those profiles in particular are an excellent example of how to do a section of something to capture its essence - and of course the more quick profile sketches you do the better you get at doing them. but these are excellent anyway! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Do you find doing contours easier than drawing without any lines (ie just sketching values shapes)?

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 05:57 AM
Michelle - I think you're maybe being a little hard on yourself. If you've not been practising your drawing for a bit you'll find it not so easy to get going. That's why the quick daily drawings are so important - as they help you to rev up easily when you do want to get into full-on sketching/drawing/painting mode.

I prescribe lots more quickies and I guarantee you'll enjoy the rest of the class more if you do.

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 06:19 AM
Just not in the mood tho trying, B/cold.
Tried to do some 10 min ones. Please feel free to comment. Posted to encourage those like myself (if Any) who need encouragement to sketch live. Photo's are already framed so easier to copy. I am much better at that.
What have I learned. pick a subject you think can be done in the time frame. The radiator could, still found I had to speed up and lost more accuracy, so what.
The pot plant, for me more a 30 min or more. thought it was ambitious for a 10 min one.
Started on the pot and did not start low enough for foilage, it is three times taller than shown. Did not have brain in gear, do know better.
I stopped on the ten min mark , could have made it a longer one but am under the weather. More like the flu not a cold am acheing all over.
Enough, comments most welcome especially hints on foilage. One thing I wondered, whether to try to draw the foilage as i saw it, or after a while to make my own up. Yup not drawing what I see then. Your thoughts on foilage drawing appreciated.
Yucky Wucky LesLes - it would be really helpful if you could post your sketches a little bigger so I can see them more clearly

You're obviously feeling yucky and drawing co-ordination disappears very fast when you're feeling under the weather so I'm very impressed with your efforts.

Drawing qithin a time limit has two purposes:
you learn what you can draw within a given time limit (and this obviously increases as you get better and faster at drawing)
you also learn how to edit and amend your drawing style so that you can get stuf down fast. Look at Jeanette's comment about drawing animals (ie guidelines / then values) as a good example of thisDon't worry about the proportions getting distorted because of where you put things on the page. This is an incredibly common problem for lots and lots of people (I can see all the members of the visual classroom nodding their heads! ;)).

So - maybe you need to work on placement of the page and proportions. One of the ways that you can get better at this is by integrating the subject into its context - rather than just leaving it 'hanging in the air'.

Let me give you a practical example. If you take a look at some of my drawing class threads in the main forum (in which I draw figures in the weekly drawing class that I go to - this is last weeks (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=350331) and the previous one (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=348824)) you'll see that I comment on how I locate my models on the page and in relation to one another by using the grid of the windows as something which acts as both a skeleton for the whole drawing and also as a measuring device. I also find the chairs are enormously helpful at locating the figures. Overall I find it much much easier to draw my figures in a room with other people, than if I just did them in isolation! :D (Note: these figure drawings are on paper which is 16.5" x 23.5" and I can fill a page this size by drawing from life in 2 hours - but bear in mind that I draw a lot!)

See whether you can find something to draw which has a context which helps to give you scale, proportion and an aid to measurement. Evaluate whether this makes it easier or more difficult. Don't try to do this too fast as this is a first time - but don't give yourself the luxury of lots of time either. How about 20-30 minutes?

Robin Neudorfer
06-07-2006, 07:09 AM
Robin - sorry for the mispelling - it was late at night for me when I did it! :o

This thread is moving rather quickly, I just wanted others to realize there are two of us. You are doing a great job, keeping up.

Do you find doing contours easier than drawing without any lines (ie just sketching values shapes)?

Perhaps I find it more relaxing. The method is calming to me. However, I find them both easy, due to many years of practice.
I am sure the method I begin with depends on my tools at hand, what I am choosing to draw, and even my mood.

IslanderNL
06-07-2006, 07:14 AM
Thanks Katherine, your tips on drawing animals will come in useful as its a subject that I find myself drawn too many times. I would like to try a watercolour sketch without the barebones of pencil or pen to back it up.

Yesterday I was at a meeting and while waiting for my turn to address the class so I sketched while they were paying attention to another speaker. I started this in pencil at the right hand window, then the pencil lead broke, so I switched to pen. I had a Micron .005 in my bag so used that.

The sketch was about 10 minutes. To me, most people are recognizable and I was just starting to add some values when I had to stop. I'm not pleased with the arms and hands rendered, the good thing is that everyone was wearing glasses that masked eyes, making it a little easier for me :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/67422-meeting_sketch.jpg

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 07:26 AM
This is really really nice Jeanette - well done!:clap::clap::clap::thumbsup:

Just goes to show as well that you can sketch people without them noticing.........;)

I liked your comment about glasses - I've found that sometimes it's easier and sometimes it's harder - it seems to depend on the frames and the eyebrows! :)

kennychaffin
06-07-2006, 07:35 AM
Here is an approximately 10 minute sketch. The tough part here was that I didn't have a brush to clear the erasure debris. :)


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/82568-10MinSketchBrushAS.jpg

KAC

Self-evaluation. I have a hard time "sketching" as I want to have a realistic drawing and sketches feel unfinished to me. I need to work on being able to quickly capture the essence of a scene or object without getting caught up in the details when the occasion calls for sketching. I need more more more practice just to get the muscle memory working and it's tough to get these 50+ year old muscles to remember anything. :)

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 07:41 AM
Here is an approximately 10 minute sketch. The tough part here was that I didn't have a brush to clear the erasure debris. :)

KACYou're surely not erasing Kenny?!:eek:.......;)

Looks to me like you got the proportions pretty well nailed if yours looks anything like mine.

How are you finding the drawing quickly exercise? And have you tried using any implements or media which are unfamiliar to you yet?

kennychaffin
06-07-2006, 07:49 AM
You're surely not erasing Kenny?!:eek:.......;)

Looks to me like you got the proportions pretty well nailed if yours looks anything like mine.

How are you finding the drawing quickly exercise? And have you tried using any implements or media which are unfamiliar to you yet?


I added a small self-evalution that addresses part of this. I am sort-of using new implements as these two I've done have been with mechanical 2mm and .5 mm lead holders instead of pencils which I've used in the past. I have not tried any different media as I want to stick with graphite and digital. (Maybe I'll throw in some digital/Painter work here as well).

KAC

Mary Woodul
06-07-2006, 08:04 AM
HELP! Can someone please tell me how I can remove (or if not, do it for me) the sketches I posted side by side and caused everyone problems with the width of their screens. I'm terribly sorry - won't happen again.

ciao
robyn

I think we got the image problem fixed robyn. Like Katherine said it is a matter of hitting the space bar after uploading each image.

robynsin
06-07-2006, 09:16 AM
Many thanks, Mary:clap: I think the sketches actually look better now you've rearranged them:lol:

Katherine - Congratulations on this wonderful class - I'm spending more time enjoying everyone elses work and all those terrific blogs you've given us the links for, than I am sketching.

Sorry I forgot to comment on my first post. I liked the 2 minute effort on our sleeping dog but feel it is more cartoon than sketch. I will have another go at that. The coffee pot taught me that I really should warm up with elipses and straight lines before sketching anything. I was quite happy with the outdoor dining area. It was complicated and I thought the perspective was heading in the right direction. Awful background tree though - and I know I do better trees when I draw the negative spaces. I'll be smarter next time. SO, major lesson learnt to date - Even if it is a quick sketch, time spent thinking about a plan of attack would be well spent.

Below is a 30 minute effort late last night. The legs of the chair are a bit wonky because DH had fallen asleep on the lounge between me and my subject and masked it. Since you mentioned it at the head of the thread, I have been sketching without my glasses. Very liberating as I usually waste so much time taking them on and off. Interesting though when I finally put them on to look at the final result - a lot of the marks are not where I thought I put them.:o
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/66219-cane_chair.jpg
I have no idea why I drew bricks at that angle next to the window! Also floor and top of sideboard aren't exactly flat - am avoiding using a rubber at this stage.

robyn

Robin Neudorfer
06-07-2006, 09:33 AM
Great job Jeanette. You captured the group really well. My .005 doesn not sketch fast well. It is really scratchy, which I can not stand. I have been using a Copic lately, so perhaps I should try one of the microns. I also like the look of a Pilot Ultra Fine when it is broken in. It gives a wonderful thick and thin line.

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 09:43 AM
Great stuff Robyn - and I like the way you're getting into the evaluation as well. :clap::clap::clap:

What I can see at the moment is some hesitancy in some of your lines. That's the bits where you're going back over the same line. Also you're 'outlining' quite a lot - again something people often do when learning to draw. Artists quite often practice redrawing a line when trying to find the right one and it's not at all uncommon to see a drawing where a line has been retraced again and again until the artist is satisfied they've got it right. The early tracery can often then be left in as an explanation of the process of drawing - the pathway to the end result. Does this describe what you're doing? Or do you not yet feel you can do one clear line as in Robin's (with an 'i') contour line drawings?

Try a couple of things:
try to draw a clean line first time. Don't retrace it. You'll find you draw more slowly and need to look more before you draw - so don't get too ambitious about what you draw.
try to differentiate between the different qualities of edges that you can see. (Are you familar with the concept of 'lost' and 'found' edges? Ask me if you;re not sure)Glad to hear you're enjoying the references - lots and lots to read and look at! Looking at other people's work is also a really important part of your own development - most people try something after they've seen other people doing it. It also opens your eyes to the possible and helps you to understand different ways of seeing and doing.

Remember always that art is an expression of an artist's insight first and foremost - technique is important but IMO it's very much in the supporting role. So looking at how other people see things / think about things and how they interpret all of that in terms of their own individual techniques says something about the artist as an individual as well as about their drawing 'signatures'.

Sketchbooks say an awful lot about individuals in terms of what they're interested in and what they choose to draw.

Do any of you feel your sketches could begin to say something about you as individuals? How might that happen?

gibson99
06-07-2006, 09:46 AM
Katherine - I looked at your examples. Great stuff. I think I get what you are saying. If I was drawing in Starbucks , say 3 people, I would use each one to compare against the other. Like the Negitive space between them?

Robin - I love your sketches. So when you do a contour (not blind) you are looking up then down at you paper the at the subject again, not unlike a regular sketch? Bear with me for these simple questions. It is my nature to try and over analize everything:)

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 10:01 AM
Katherine - I looked at your examples. Great stuff. I think I get what you are saying. If I was drawing in Starbucks , say 3 people, I would use each one to compare against the other. Like the Negitive space between them?

Robin - I love your sketches. So when you do a contour (not blind) you are looking up then down at you paper the at the subject again, not unlike a regular sketch? Bear with me for these simple questions. It is my nature to try and over analize everything:)You're doing great John. Exactly that. Relating your subjects to a background gives you all that negative space and shapes as extra information to play with. Plus things like windows give you a measured spacing which helps with positioning. HOWEVER Do beware of moving your head though. I have to decide how I'm going to sit and have to get comfortable before I tackle my subjects every Thursday evening. Very often when I think they've moved, THEY haven't and I HAVE! :rolleyes:

Outline contour drawing is just the same as regular sketching - except for the fact that you describe your subject only using a single line. And yes, Robin does get to look at her paper!:D

jmfletch
06-07-2006, 10:41 AM
:evil: Posting three 5 min sketches and one 15 min sketch using lines.

I wanted it to be loose and I think I came close. I thought the time limit would be a problem but I used a timer and in all 4 cases was startled when it went off as I had totally forgotten time and was focused on the act of sketching. In all the sketches the proportions are totally off. Also I used a .7 mm mechanical pencil as I thought always having a sharp point would be a plus but now looking at them I don't like the sameness of the lines. They all seem "cold".


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/17342-Lesson_102-3_5min01_wc.jpg
In the first 5 min sketch (the bear) I captured the basic shape but none of the texture. It is actually a wood carving. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/17342-Lesson_102-3_5min02_wc.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/17342-Lesson_102-3_5min03_wc.jpg


I find I really like not erasing there is a certain freedom to knowing the lines are staying. But this also changes perspective as in the clay pieces I drew the ellipses for them and since they show up they change the perspective as it looks like you are seeing the top when in reality they were above eye-level.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/17342-Lesson_102-3_15min_01_wc.jpg
In the 15 minute sketch I assumed I would finish and started on the left basically finishing each object before moving on to the next object. Bad idea as I only got halfway through the image I had in mind.

Now I am going off to learn the uploader. By George I think I got it!!: ( the uploader..ot sketching.)
Joe

mmdm
06-07-2006, 10:52 AM
I've got a question about establishing the background first. How would you go about doing this in pen, when the foreground objects are going to overlap the background in places that haven't been established yet, if you start with the background? With pencil, anything that overlapped could be erased, or the background could be drawn lighter than the foreground to begin with, so the overlap wouldn't be as distracting. I can't think how to make it work in ink, though. Should I forget about trying to use pen and stick to pencil?

Les - I hope you are feeling better today.

frida
06-07-2006, 12:00 PM
If you scroll down while commenting - you can always see the images of people who used the little icon - but not those where people have used the attachment facility. It just makes it an awful lot easier for people commenting - otherwise I have to have same thread open twice.
I still have many posts to read, but wanted to comment about this, Katherine, even though someone else may have by now...

When I encounter a thumbnail (or two or three!), I open them and leave them open when I go to reply, so I can toggle back and forth using the bars below. That way they are always visible!

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 12:02 PM
Joe - lovely to see you in class - especially as you weren't planning on sketching again! ;):D

I think you're doing brilliantly, in the first three I have a very strong sense that you've focused on the overall proportion and got that correct. They look 'right' if you know what I mean.

In your third one, it's a typical 15 minuter - becoming distracted by detail means it becomes a challenge to finish. Happens to us all. I think if you'd tried to do what you did with the first three and got all your items 'sketched' in you'd have then had enough time to add some detail and for us to be clear what it was you were doing. If you try that as a strategy in future I think you'll find it fruitful.

Well done on the self-reflection and the learning BTW - that was good (and the images showed up when I scrolled down - give yourself a pat on the back for learning the uploader! :thumbsup:)

Fireman's kid
06-07-2006, 12:05 PM
Okay, I'm cheating a little, but I really wanted to be able to join this class. I am posting 2 sketches that I did a week and a half ago. They were both done in public places. The first sketch is of an appetizer that hubby and I ordered while out to lunch. I had to sketch fast because he was eating it while I drew. :lol: The second sketch is of the lifeguard stand at our local community pool.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/31442-WC_102_L3_appetizer.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/31442-WC_102_L3_lifeguard_chair.jpg

Both were done using a 2B pencil in 5 1/2" x 8 1/2" sketchbooks - the first a Strathmore with 60 lb. sheets and the second in my new moleskine.

Of the two, I actually like the first the best because the lines are more expressive. I think I should have done less with the values because I feel the values detract from the contour which is what drew me to sketch it in the first place. My difficulties in sketching quick definitely come from getting the shape down accurately. The perspective is off on this as well as the ellipses. And once I get flustered getting the shapes down the rest of it rarely comes together in a way I that I like.

In the second sketch I was trying harder to get the perspective right (not very successfully) so I drew it all lightly (erasing as needed :o ) and then went over it to darken it at the end. As a result the line wieght is the same throughout the drawing which I think makes it a boring sketch. I left out the values after my issues with value in the first sketch.

I will try to do some new sketches following the given assignments.

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 12:08 PM
I've got a question about establishing the background first. How would you go about doing this in pen, when the foreground objects are going to overlap the background in places that haven't been established yet, if you start with the background? With pencil, anything that overlapped could be erased, or the background could be drawn lighter than the foreground to begin with, so the overlap wouldn't be as distracting. I can't think how to make it work in ink, though. Should I forget about trying to use pen and stick to pencil? I think my answer in short is it varies according to people's individual skills. On the whole it's probably best to stick to trying to "walk before you run".

The principle of how it works in pen is exactly the same - but in pen and ink you've got to be pretty much spot on with your sight-sizing - and if you're not used to it then you're more likely to get it wrong. I'd build up to it using pencil to start with and gain confidence in your ability to sight-size. (Do you know what I mean by 'sight-sizing'?)

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 12:12 PM
I still have many posts to read, but wanted to comment about this, Katherine, even though someone else may have by now...

When I encounter a thumbnail (or two or three!), I open them and leave them open when I go to reply, so I can toggle back and forth using the bars below. That way they are always visible!Thanks Raquel - it's just from experience I've found it a lot easier if all I have to do is use the roller bit on my mouse to scroll up and down. The trouble for me is I'm commenting on a lot of people's posts and tend to read them all before I start to comment - which would mean I have a lot of thumbnails open before I started and would then tend to get a bit confused.

Plus to be perfectly frank I can spend much more time on commenting if I spend much less time trying to find the images! ;)

mmdm
06-07-2006, 12:21 PM
Yes, I know what sight-sizing is, I'm just not very good at it. :) I tried one in pencil this morning, doing the background first. The background went fine, but then I tried to use that to place my foreground object and it all went bad. I think the main problem was that the foreground object was a curvy wooden chair, placed at an angle, and the perspective was causing me problems. No time for vanishing point lines and such in a quick sketch and eyeballing it wasn't working for me. I was so focused on getting the right angles, that the chair kept coming out too big. I coulnd't make it fit in the space it should have occupied, according to the background objects. Actually, if I hadn't had a background in there, the chair itself would have looked fine, but I couldn't make it work together. I think more practice is in order with a simpler subject.

I'm finding it hard to find things to sketch here at the house. There is too much clutter everywhere and everything I think might work would lead to me having to clean first, to reduce the amount of stuff to be sketched, LOL!

I am probably going to be your problem student, because I have always had so many questions about this and no one to ask. I'm likely to drive you nuts.

kwint
06-07-2006, 12:21 PM
Here's a sketch from last night of my husband petting our old cat who's in failing health and not long for this world.

A larger sized scan can be seen on my blog today:
http://karenwinters.com/kblog/2006/06/07/mandu-is-declining/

The "manage attachments" function doesn't allow for anything larger than 500 x 600 which is pretty small to display a whole page with a lot of detail. I don't see any "uploader" button but maybe that doesn't display in the Mac (Safari) browser.

Anyway, it was drawn in the same Moleskine Cahier that I used for the Ripley sketches, and the same Micron 005 pen, which is getting a little bit dry - I'll need to switch to something else.

What I liked about this: I got a good likeness on my husband, even though I had to restate his profile a bit as he moved. He really did try to hold very still for me, even though he was practically falling asleep sitting up. I liked the foreshortening on his right arm, but his left hand was a disaster. More practice needed - and refreshing myself with one of my anatomy books. The bottom of his left leg was done too slapdash at the end, I should have kept up the concentration. In this exercise I tried to give some thought to overlapping lines to create a feeling of volume - and tried not to put in any more detail than necessary. I didn't draw every wrinkle in his t-shirt, for example, just a few to suggest folds.

This was a 15 minute drawing, and I added some extra fur to Mandu after that time, I think because I just felt like "petting her" with my pen some more.

To answer that background/foreground question ... I usually draw my foregrounds first and then draw the background around it. Since there's no erasing with pen, that's not an option for me, although i've seen some pretty cool drawings where people let the transparency of overlapping forms become part of the work. I might try that some time.

Karen

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 12:39 PM
Stacy - lovely to see you participating after all and thank you for posting your sketches.

That was a realy thoughtful evaluation and you're in the running for the gold star today! What it made me think is that you maybe you need to develop more confidence in the first line you draw. I've just told Robyn (Italy) the same thing because I detect a certain hesitancy in her line as well.

I think you'll be able to develop the quality of your line once you have confidence that you're getting the line right first time. That way you won't need to go back over and restate all the time. There's nothing wrong with restating a line - but it does take time and is maybe more suited to a still life situation rather than when you're trying to draw outside where you have a lot of other issues to deal with.

I think I'm going to suggest that you and Italian Robyn both do the same thing. This applies also to anybody else who thinks they have problems with getting your line right first time.
Switch from pencil to pen - with commitment comes observation and with observation comes confidence! ;)
You need one that glides smoothly (nothing scratchy) do that you're not distracted. A relatively cheap pen which I find is fine for sketching is the Pilot VBall 0.5. This will give you an even line much like a mechanical pencil. It's possible with both to get both weight and lightness into lines once you become familiar with using them.
Focus first of all on looking at what you're drawing and think about your approach to drawing it. Notice which are straight lines, which are curved, think about angles. Decide which line you're going to start with and then draw it - in your head. Nothing on paper. Just watch the object and move your hand. Practice drawing your line.
Now you can have a go with the pen. Try to draw a clean line and get it right first time. Don't correct it at all. You'll find that you probably draw much more slowly to start with and will speed up as your confidence grows.Don't worry if your first few attempts aren't up to much ( I bet I can show you ones which are worse than anything you produce!). Practising drawing with a pen will really help you with your hand/eye co-ordination

See how you do and tell me how it feels.

And for those who now feel COMPLETELY puzzled I'm not contradicting myself in relation to my previous advice to Melisa. People are at different stages and need to try different drawing strategies for sketching. To recap:
Try drawing with a pen to draw a single object with confidence.
Once you've got that sorted, the next step is to switch back to pencil and to try integrating your object into its background context to create a complete picture (ie walk before you run)
When you're getting the hang of that, you can then switch back to a pen and see how you do with drawing a complete sketch of a scene with a pen

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 12:42 PM
Melisa - your comments suggest to me that you're not remembering to use negative spaces/shapes to help you draw

Go and draw your cooker - with pots and pans.

I guarantee you're not going to drive me nuts!

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 12:53 PM
Karen - that's a lovely drawing - and I can highly recommend doing lots of drawings of Mandu before she sets off for munching upstairs. You'll be so glad you did them when she's no longer around.

I think you've done very well indeed. It comes across as relaxed, and has just the right amount of detail. I loved the bit where you said you wanted to pet Mandu by giving her a bit more fur!

I agree with you re the leg - but that's a trap so many of us fall into - continuing to sketch when we've lost concentration.

Personally I like slightly unfinished sketches - I'm not quite sure why - but it's maybe they always seem more relaxed than a highly finished piece. The latter always make me think they're a bit like the visual equivalent of your husband having to put a tie on to go out to dinner while in a sketch he can keep his shorts on!

On the upload front I'm afraid I'm complete in the dark re Macs and Safari. The upload icon looks like two small mountains with a square sun and a yellow sky.

mhimeswc
06-07-2006, 12:54 PM
Yes, I know what sight-sizing is, I'm just not very good at it. :) I'm finding it hard to find things to sketch here at the house. There is too much clutter everywhere and everything I think might work would lead to me having to clean first, to reduce the amount of stuff to be sketched, LOL!



I had to laugh at this, Melisa, because I'm having the same problem. In fact, I have a spare bedroom to use as a "studio" and have been doing my watercolors on the kitchen table because the studio is too cluttered to even walk in, much less paint in. Now I'm eating at a snack table in the tv room because my watercolor stuff is on the kitchen table. :o

Michelle

mmdm
06-07-2006, 01:09 PM
I had to laugh at this, Melisa, because I'm having the same problem. In fact, I have a spare bedroom to use as a "studio" and have been doing my watercolors on the kitchen table because the studio is too cluttered to even walk in, much less paint in. Now I'm eating at a snack table in the tv room because my watercolor stuff is on the kitchen table. :o

Michelle

Are you sure we don't live in the same house? My "art and sewing room" is also too jammed to walk in, so all my paint, pencils, glues, ect. are on the kitchen table and we've been eating on the couch, which I hate to do. I clean the table off, and 2 days later it is in the same condition, because I had things I wanted to work on. Oh well, my house is a disaster, but I'm doing what I enjoy.

I'm off to try drawing the stove, dirty pots and all.

kwint
06-07-2006, 01:14 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/46919-666-walk.jpg
OK, I'm using this other drawing from yesterday as a way to test out the upload function. A larger sized version can be seen here:

http://www.karenwinters.com/blogimages/666-walk.jpg

These things were drawn as we walked home from voting:

We stopped in the vet's office to pick up a bag of fluid for Mandu, and I asked the little girl and her mother if I could draw her with her dog. They wiggled around a lot so I kept redrawing her arm, to no avail.

The cosmos flower and tree held still for me very nicely. Ditto the traffic light although I lost my concentration when the pizza slice arrived and did a poor job of equally spacing out the three parts of the fixture.

What I tried on the cosmos blossom: to use curved lines to suggest volume, concavity and convexity. In watercolor I would have let value do the job, but that wasn't an option here.

Tree: my objective was to suggest leafiness without drawing every single leaf.

Pile o' dirt: My husband is so patient. Me: "Can we stop so I can draw that pile of dirt?" Husband: Sure. I guess there is nothing more public than standing on a major boulevard drawing a pile of dirt. The challenge in this case was to suggest texture without drawing every stone, nor shading the whole thing. Micron in Cahier again.

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 01:28 PM
Great Karen - and what a way to remember 06/06/06!

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 01:32 PM
I've finally found Murray's thread about the upload icon - it's here for anybody not familiar with it http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=291386

Fireman's kid
06-07-2006, 01:35 PM
Thanks Katherine! I have to take my girls to the dentist office in an hour. Plan to take my sketchbook and pen and see what I can accomplish. :)

Karen, your sketches are great. Hubby looks almost asleep in the sketch with the cat. The page of sketches are great, but I especially love your notes. Had a good :lol: over the Jimmy Hoffa comment.

Michelle and Melisa, you are too funny! This is exactly why my husband made the "nothing but art stuff on the art table" rule immediately after he assembled it. He wanted to make sure he had somewhere to eat dinner. :D I've been surprisingly good with the rule too. Although I had to clean my studio space this weekend because I have so many projects in process. :rolleyes:

By the way, if I didn't say it before Michelle, it's good to have you back in class. :)

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 01:43 PM
And I found a link for those who might like - in due course - to have a go at sketching with brush and ink!

http://www.sketching.cc/articles/brush_ink.html

gibson99
06-07-2006, 01:58 PM
With regards to Background, I read an article in a sketching Magazine Not to long ago where the artist used a method he Called STACKING. In other words you draw whats right in front of you , then the next thing in back and the next. You still have to use the references that Katherine suggested ie ; Negitive space, window, etc. I thought this might help with the background with pen.


Kwint - your sketches are wonderfull and the information that you supply is a great help for me.

Katherine T
06-07-2006, 02:17 PM
With regards to Background, I read an article in a sketching Magazine Not to long ago where the artist used a method he Called STACKING. In other words you draw whats right in front of you , then the next thing in back and the next. You still have to use the references that Katherine suggested ie ; Negitive space, window, etc. I thought this might help with the background with pen.


Kwint - your sketches are wonderfull and the information that you supply is a great help for me.She's great isn't she! ;)

John - you've hit on exactly what you have to do when we get to tackling sketching a landscape. I call it working out the zones - foreground, middle ground and background are the minimum zones you should identify. The principles are exactly the same when tackling interiors.

And I guess in a weird sort of way that anybody used to working in layers with PS (which i'm not) might also find this idea familiar.

mmdm
06-07-2006, 02:46 PM
OK, this is really bad and I am only showing it to prove that I AM practicing. This was a really bad angle. I wasn't directly in front of the stove, but only a little to the side. Right in front of the right-side edge, I'd say. And my kitchen is so small, I could barely get far enough away from the stove to fit it in my 4x6 viewfinder, and this was as far to one side as I could get, too.

Evaluation? I don't know. I hate it. Is that helpful, lol? The perspective on the top part, where the knobs are, is off, but I just couldn't get it right. This is how it looked to me, but it looks wrong in the sketch. I put in the shadows, but they are from an overhead light, are boring, and add nothing good that I can see. I tried to use the negative shape of the stove top to put in the burners and the bottoms of the pans. I don't like it at all, but I don't know what I could do to make it better, other than fixing the perspective. And this took me almost 40 minutes! :rolleyes:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/9614-stove.jpg

pallavi
06-07-2006, 03:01 PM
Hi Kathrine,
Sorry for jumping the assignment last time. this time I have drawn something inside the house.
The first picture is of my younger son.he was siting on the sofa watching Tom and Jerry. That's the only time when I can expect them to sit still.Anyway I started the sketch and midway I decided not to draw any kind of feature because I thought it would take longer than 10 mins. I wanted to ask you one thing. Are we supposed to do the observation and and sketching all in 10 mins.by the way the whole sketch took 10 mins

Now the self assesment part.I will start with the things I was not happy with.
1. again I had tough time determining values In fact i was so busy keeping my line drawing correct that I did not concentrate on the value.
2. I think it is also possible to depict form with marks.I tried to do that on the sitting part of the sofa.I wanted to show the rounded edge but I was not able to give the impression of even the flat sitting part of the sofa.
3.The legs and hands could were not appealing though i think they do give the impression oflegs on over the other.

Now the part i am happy with:
the only part i am happy is that I was able to give the feeling of a small boy sitting in big sofa.I took advice and kept on relating to the various proportions and so i think I did a satisfactory job here.What do you think? Was i able to convey the feeling of a 4 years old boy sitting on a two sitter sofa?

The second drawing is of a cup.-5mins
I choose this subject in order to be able to concentrate on the values but i failed to draw even the lines correctly. some how I felt tired of of doping this sketch I know I did not give my utmost attention in configuring the forms.

This whole excercise feels very tiring and it seems I am not able to do two sketches one after another.I feel drained but after few mintues when I see these sketches I like the feeling.I feel that i have created somthing which is not a copy but my interpretation of whatever is there.for instance I could have ignored the sofa and the sitting posture of my son and gone for his features instead but.i went for the posture and even the sketch is not perfect it does give me the satisfaction of seeing that moment from my point of view and I really liked it.

I would be eagerly waiting for your input.
Bye
Pal

Mary Woodul
06-07-2006, 03:07 PM
Katherine this is another quick one of about 8 min. My assessment on this is that it shows my insecurity with the hatching and the quick sketching. The lines in my table are not straight and the perspective is probably off. You can tell I don't know how to hatch yet and I had trouble with the leaves of the plant . On the left side it was easier to go from the tip to the stem and on the right from the stem to the tip. Still, I have no control with defined lines. 3b wooden pencil on Canson Sketchbook.

Karen your work is an eye treat and a learning experience for us.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/43096-102-3-3.jpg

kwint
06-07-2006, 03:18 PM
Hi Gibson99 ... thanks for your kind comment.

Stacking, so that's what it's called, eh? Yes, that's what I do, I draw what's in front, then what's in back. In the case of the profile of my husband on the sofa, I started with his forehead, drew his profile and the rest of his face and chin, then went back and added his features.
I suggested the line of his left shoulder and left upper arm so I'd know where to "cut across" with his right arm. Then I drew his right arm and placed the head and shoulders of our cat. That gave me an 'anchor' for his left hand, which I botched badly, but oh well. These basic structures gave me a framework for putting in the sleeve of his shirt, the neck of his T shirt and to start to add definition to his hand (knuckles) and some overlapping lines for volume. I added more of the cat. Only after all that was in place did I start to draw the other pillows, comforter, sofa and so on. I knew those things wouldn't move very much and even if they did, I could "fake it."
I try not to put in any more detail than necessary. For example, I don't draw every square on the comforter, just a few, and I only colored three of those. I don't want the background to detract from my subject.
But that's how I go about stacking. If I needed something to overlap my foreground subject, for example a pillow covering part of my husband's right arm, I would have drawn that overlap as I drew his arm.

Maybe this is all TMI (too much information) huh? I tend to run on when it's a topic I'm excited about.

gibson99
06-07-2006, 04:01 PM
Karen - getting excited about sketching is what's it about:) Thats what I do. I some times drive my wife crazy when I say "look what I did!!" all of the time.
I don't know if STACKING is a formal method or something an artist made up , but it fits. Althought , sometimes I start with the background.

Melisa - I like the stove sketch:)

mhimeswc
06-07-2006, 04:11 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/20035-stove.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/20035-cactus.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/20035-bag.jpg

Here are three sketches of about 6 sketches I did today. The first is a 5 minute sketch with a fine Sharpie of my stove, with dirty pots and pans on it, as well as a spray bottle of kitchen cleaner, a can of olive oil spray, and a plastic bag with apples in it. Using the pen made me fiddle less, but it leaked through two pages underneath. I'm using an inexpensive sketch pad because I don't want to use good paper. I didn't get much done in 5 minutes did I!

The second is my Christmas cactus, pen, 10 minute sketch. I looked for something small with an interesting shape. It WAS small, but hard to draw in 10 minutes. I roughed it out in pencil, and ended up just scribbling the leaves to get it done on time. This one leaked through also.

The third is my new handbag that I bought yesterday (half price!). This one is in pencil and took 15 minutes. The most difficult part was getting the strap right, and getting it to cross in front of the bag in the right places. I think it came out rather well for a line drawing. You can see that I'm taking the whole time to get a line drawing and have not had time to do any shading.

I learned that I'm S-L-O-W, but I already knew that. I actually become indecisive when I try to be quick, and that makes for awkward, choppy looking drawings.

mmdm
06-07-2006, 04:17 PM
Using the pen made me fiddle less, but it leaked through two pages underneath. I'm using an inexpensive sketch pad because I don't want to use good paper.


The Pitt artist pen I use doesn't leak through as bad as sharpies, but it does go through in spots so I just stick a loose sheet underneath whatever page I am working on. I keep the loose sheet stuck in the back of the sketchbook so I can find it.

jmfletch
06-07-2006, 04:20 PM
Joe - lovely to see you in class - especially as you weren't planning on sketching again! ;):D

I think you may have gotten that idea from my post in the poll, ...
Wasn't on my list of things of things to ever do again, but I guess the next class will tell.

I was referring to sketching in public vice sketching in general. I really do want to learn to sketch and to be able to let go and focus on capturing the moment vice working on drawing the image if that makes sense. Will try the public part again for the class assignment...but no guarantees on converting. :angel:

Thanks for your kind words.
Joe

vhere
06-07-2006, 06:39 PM
people keep saying their sketches are 'really bad' - and there isn't a bad one on this thread but lots of lively sketches with something going for each of them.

I really like your work Karen and I've added your blog to my list of those I follow. The one of your husband and elderly cat caught the sadness in his face - real pathos in it, a very moving and delightful drawing.

I'm going to cheat and put one in that I did last month as I've been so busy with work that I knew yesterday and today there wouldn't be time to sketch.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/53888-e__pencil_sketch_of_Brancaster_Staithe_copy.jpg

double page in a 6x4 sketchbook, pencil. about 30 minutes.

It is done in a salt marsh harbour, sitting looking back at the village with reeds and a couple of boats.

Because it was a quick sketch while my friends went for a walk, I didn't stop to consider the composition quite enough and was left with a large space 'doing nothing' on the left bottom corner and leaving it a bit unbalanced. I solved it as well as I could by the sweeping lines, suggesting marks in the sandy muddy surface.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/53888-e__thornham_sketch_copy.jpg

this one was further down the coast, looking out over the saltmarsh to the sea and I did deepen the sky when I got home so that added to the half hour it had taken plein air.

I lost some of the highlights in this and used my trusty Tippex (typing correction) pen to regain them - I find it very useful.

I was fairly happy with the textures of the old tree stumps, weathered and ancient, often under water. It's almost like a stone circle the way the stumps are arranged.

It's a mixture of pencil, ink and tippex.

Anita Murphy
06-07-2006, 07:04 PM
Vivien - your sketches are wonderful! The lower one of the beach - Interesting idea of using a Tippex pen to put back the highlights!

I sketched in Starbucks this morning - give me time for a cup of tea (I just got home from work!) and I will try to get a decent image of them. My work is too light to show well on here.

vhere
06-07-2006, 07:29 PM
thanks Anita :) and I look forward to seeing your sketches.

IslanderNL
06-07-2006, 08:02 PM
There are some wonderful sketches here and such a variety of subjects and techniques. I think its great to push ourselves a little out of our comfort zones and sketch in plein air, whether of other people or the landscapes.

Tonight the rabbit I fondly call "Biker Bunny" came calling again. I call him that as he has a chunk missing from one ear, his turf wars perhaps. Anyway he turns up regularly but doesn't eat the flowers - yet. He stays still for ages eating or freezing in position if he hears something, making the perfect candidate for sketching.

Tonight I got my Derwent Graphitint pencils so I tried them on on the rabbit. They may take a little getting used to but I like the effect of them, even if they made the rabbit look a little bald at this point! :)

This took about 25 minutes and I finished up a few details after he'd scampered off.

I need to effectively render fur texture with this medium and am tempted to go over it with more pencil or touches of pen to indicate fur. Do you go back and 'touch up'?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/67422-bunny.JPG

Anita Murphy
06-07-2006, 08:05 PM
Here are a mixture. I have problem with legs on people! I know its something I need to work on. Actually I have a problem with people! :lol:

I've been concentrating on people because I know its my weak point. I just wish they would sit still! :(

Going to try something different tomorrow.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/58769-Class3_a.jpg

Cup was about 10 minutes and the salt shaker (I know my ellipses are off!) about 30 minutes.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/58769-Class_3_b.jpg

Both about 10 minutes - had to be sneaky the girl was sitting way too close to me! The guy kept moving so the arms are all over the place!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/58769-Class_3_c.jpg

Again 10 minutes each. Happier with these two than the previous two.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/58769-Class_3_d.jpg

This was a couple of days ago - around 30 minutes.

Anita Murphy
06-07-2006, 08:08 PM
Jeanette!!! WONDERFUL!! I have to get some graphitints!

IslanderNL
06-07-2006, 08:09 PM
These are great Anita, I especially like the sketches of the people that you did. I always say that if I don't make eye contact, I can get away with sketching people in public. :)

Robin Neudorfer
06-07-2006, 08:27 PM
Somebody said something in a past post about dirty dishes, so before I stuck mine into the dishwasher this afternoon, I quickly set up a still life. It got me thinking about finished paintings that are not just beautiful table settings, but day to day chores. I am working to see quick images and capture a 5 min composition.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/30341-sketch_6:7:06.jpg

Continuing to capture people, this was at the ice rink. Occasionally I can capture the face of a parent, but usually they are watching the ice. I wish I could sketch the skaters... but talk about movement.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/30341-sketch_6:7:06_-_2.jpg

JamieWG
06-07-2006, 09:03 PM
Two quick ones from me for today---the two five minute sketches for the class. Half hour time blocks don't exist for me these days, so I'm going to just have to do them one at a time as I can.

The top one was done while waiting in the parking lot for my daughter to come out of the school building. It's less than five minutes because the car left!

The bottom one is five minutes of part of a rock wall with pen and ink. But I couldn't resist adding one more minute of a little color at the end. I know, I know....it's not in "The Lesson Plan", but I'm a color junkie and I couldn't help myself. I had a little pan set of watercolors in the car and one of those water barrel brushes, so I pulled that out.

My apologies to those of you who thought you'd get sketches of my new studio mascot. I'll have to try to catch him another time.

Both these sketches are on a single 5x8 moleskine sketchbook page.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/13766-060706_car_wall_450.jpg

What did I learn?
Don't sketch a car that's about to leave.
Rocks like these in pen and ink are harder than you think! I think I'll do some more. The shapes of the rocks and shadows between them aren't too hard, but the texture is very difficult.

Jamie

"J"
06-07-2006, 10:06 PM
I learned I am not very good at this. I did go out of my comfort zone. I usually use mechanical pencils in an upright position using the point. This time I used a regular pencil on its side. Very uncomfortable for me, but on the point I usually work on detail and not speed. Also I usually use a grid and draw from photos.

I don't have any idea how to show you my sketches. I don't have a site to post them to.

Anita Murphy
06-07-2006, 10:19 PM
J - scan or photograph the drawings. Then go to Go Advanced on the reply section. It will change the page. Above the section your right in are some icons. CLick the yellow square with the mountains in - this will open another window. Browse to find your files on your computer - they must not exceed 500 x 600 pixels - and the load them. Once loaded click on the image and it will send it to the writing box of the reply section. Then Click Submit reply. If that doesn't make any sense let me know and I will PM you step by step instructions.

"J"
06-07-2006, 10:37 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/84176-Assign_1_class_102_._3.jpg

Thanks present. I had done everything but didn't know about the advanced to find the browse button.

gibson99
06-07-2006, 10:45 PM
Too many new entrys to comment on. But everyone is doing really good work:) So Present You are a Startbucky along with Robin? Well I spend my lunch at starbucks today.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/44925-starbucks6_7.jpg

About 15 minutes

Anita Murphy
06-07-2006, 11:18 PM
Gibson - it was a good excuse for a muffin for breakfast! :D Funny how many people are on computers in there! Oh and lovely sketch - it says something about modern life!

Anita Murphy
06-07-2006, 11:22 PM
J - well done - keep sketching! It gets easier the more you do.

Striver
06-07-2006, 11:53 PM
Just for Robin, I am the dishwasher! amongst other chores, very considerate wifey, will keep the dishes for me thro the day!
Are'nt the sketches great.
Perhaps tomorrow, I seem to have a temperature at the moment.
Back to dozy land
Les
Oh, Karen, that was great about HOW and WHERE you start a sketch, believe me very valuable to those at my level, most of the time seems a hit and miss go. So how you start and then how you move around gradually forming the picture is gratifying. Thank you.
Now to doze, perhaps to dream of sketching
Les

Robin Neudorfer
06-07-2006, 11:57 PM
I just want to say how impressed I am with everyones attempts here in the sketching class. There are so many opportunities if we only make it a priority. If you keep sketching it will become a habit, that you will come to enjoy. You will find that you miss it, if you don't do it one day.

"J"
06-07-2006, 11:57 PM
I sketched this just after dark standing on my front poarch with no light turned on. It is the night skylight looking over the house across the street.

I did this one standing so out of my comfort zone. I can't stand for long so it made me hurry.
Went back to my mechanical pencil
Sort of cheating since no one can see me in the dark without lights.

You cat people should have a lazy dog. They go to sleep and don't move for long periods. I do miss the antics of a cat tho as they are so vocal and entertaining. Don't miss the cat box.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/84176-2nd_assign.jpg

mbeckett
06-08-2006, 12:08 AM
i took my sketch book to my daughter's band concert tonight, and thought i would share the experience, as i have been scared to death to try sketching in public. i have a couple of times, but i hid in a corner. not this time...lol! once is settled in a bit, it wasn't so bad.

i'm not sure exactly how long most of these took, but it was around 2 or 3 minutes... the length of the song they were playing (unless stated otherwise). all the sketches are in the order i drew them.


1) the saxophone player sitting in a chair (actually my daughter). i was very tense drawing this and it shows. constantly looking over my shoulder, but no one is watching... whew!

2) the trumpet player. this one i hate. got caught in fiddly detail and got proportions horribly wrong. still in panic mode here...

3) determined to get a better trumpet player, i made a point of roughing in big shapes quickly, then add detail. a little better... relaxing a bit now. still doing the shoulder checks. hey... no one seems to care.

4) the band teacher. i had more like 10 minutes for this one. but he kept turning around as he was giving out awards. you can see i tried doing a different angle in the same sketch. my daughter recognized him. must have a hint of a likeness...lol

5) the floating saxophone. i'm starting to figure out that i'm not going to get a complete drawing done in the few minutes i'm getting. so now i'm concentrating on the things i see that jump out at me. this one i only had a minute or so and the band left! still... i like what i did get on paper. i don't care who's behind me now.

continued on next post...

wabbitt
06-08-2006, 12:12 AM
Wow, everyone got so far ahead of me already. So many drawings, so little time. So here's my assignment 1 and part of assignment 2.

5 minute sketches: I don't have a dog or cat, I got a mini malamute plushie to pose for me.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/76057-class2.JPG
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/76057-class1.JPG

15 & 30 minute sketches (well, that was my intent but I had lots of work interruptions)

Handbag, gel pen, stubby pencil, & small moleskine:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/76057-class4.JPG

I carry my Fabriano in a "Bible bag" with a zippered pocket on the outside. Brush pens, gel pen, mechanical pencil, and medium stomp:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/76057-class3.JPG

I haven't sketched alot with pen, these are among my first. After following that pen_ink thread Katherine recommended, I'm thinking of going to bamboo pen when I have the luxury of a stable drawing surface (like a restaurant table or at home.) I'm going to try to get a bamboo pen & brush combo this weekend. Impact? I felt rushed and pressured. I was fine with it, but I also chose subjects I'm very familiar with.

mbeckett
06-08-2006, 12:15 AM
....continued from previous post...

6) Trombones. now i figured i should concentrate on the things that jump out of the scene, i did this just to capture the relationship between the trombonists. not very realistic, but i didn't care. i think i got their position well for a few minute drawing.

At this point, i'm now getting much braver. i started to sketch the girl sitting in front of me. didn't get 2 lines drawn and she turned around and looked straight at me. i froze! :eek: i quickly turned the page and that was the end of that sketch...lol! i need lots more work on sketching in public, obviously.

7) the school. this one took about 10 minutes while i was sitting in the car, waiting for the rest of the family to leave the concert.

thanks, Katherine for putting this course together. i've been wanting to get over the life sketching hump for a while, and this certainly gives me a start. i hope when others get to sketching in public, this little story will relate. there's safety in numbers...lol!

Striver
06-08-2006, 12:26 AM
Wonderful Mike, keep it up very impressive from here, envy you, lots of material and you can only improve as you go. Enjoyed it and I bet you did too.
regards
Les

kwint
06-08-2006, 12:32 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/46919-ripley-brn-paper.jpg

With our cat in failing health, I am determined to draw our other animals even more than I have before. I am also determined to try to do something to get out of my comfort zone. So, I rarely draw with colored pencil and hardly ever on tinted paper, so I rooted around for a sketchbook that had recycled type paper and did this sketch of Ripley using the tan of the paper for her tan fur and just shading in white cp for her white fur. I used a prismacolor burnt umber pencil for the drawing. Drawing the outline, etc. took about 13 min, and the coloring in took a few minutes more. She was lying on the floor about 4 feet away from me and I was seated in my chair, so that's the viewpoint. I will probably try drawing something with ink on this paper and maybe gouache or chalk for highlighting.

Self assessment: overall I think the anatomy of the dog is OK. I like how the forelegs turned out and I spent much of the time on them. I wish that I had given more thought to variable line weight. Also, I didn't do anything to "ground" her on a carpet. She could just be doing a very strange ballet in the air.

wabbitt
06-08-2006, 12:55 AM
Mike, I love your narratatve with illustrations!

At this point, i'm now getting much braver. i started to sketch the girl sitting in front of me. didn't get 2 lines drawn and she turned around and looked straight at me. i froze! i quickly turned the page and that was the end of that sketch...lol!

Funny where we find our challenges, isn't it?:lol: Well done!

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 02:57 AM
OK, this is really bad and I am only showing it to prove that I AM practicing. This was a really bad angle. I wasn't directly in front of the stove, but only a little to the side. Right in front of the right-side edge, I'd say. And my kitchen is so small, I could barely get far enough away from the stove to fit it in my 4x6 viewfinder, and this was as far to one side as I could get, too.

Evaluation? I don't know. I hate it. Is that helpful, lol? The perspective on the top part, where the knobs are, is off, but I just couldn't get it right. This is how it looked to me, but it looks wrong in the sketch. I put in the shadows, but they are from an overhead light, are boring, and add nothing good that I can see. I tried to use the negative shape of the stove top to put in the burners and the bottoms of the pans. I don't like it at all, but I don't know what I could do to make it better, other than fixing the perspective. And this took me almost 40 minutes! :rolleyes:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/9614-stove.jpgWell I think it's a rather good sketch actually. I am however a bit confused as to what was your eyeline.

Do you actually work out where your eyeline is and mark it on your paper when you sketch and perspective is involved? I always find my eyeline first and then try to remember to put a mark down on the paper before I do anything else first so that I know which way the lines ought to be going - above and below the line! It might be worth you just sitting down again and doing a basic check to see whether you got the lines doing the right thing.

In your picture I wonder also if you've scanned it at a slight angle?

Now the main thing you got from this Melisa is that I know you can integrate an object with its background you now know what you can do in 40 minutes - so when you get outside and are faced with any architecture you'll have an idea of what you might be able to do in the time available to you.

My recommendation for people sketching outside is 'keep it simple with perspective'. Don't get overly ambitious - challenge yourself but don't take yourself too far out of your comfort zone so all you want to do is give up.

Also when you go outside I suggest you aim for a 'task and finish' approach to your sketch - keep pushing those boundaries until you know what you can tackle comfortably and do reasonably well. It's OK to have failures some of the time but we don't want you having them all the time!

How long do you think you can set aside to do outside sketches for assignments 2 and 3?

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 03:22 AM
Hi Kathrine,
Sorry for jumping the assignment last time. this time I have drawn something inside the house.
The first picture is of my younger son.he was siting on the sofa watching Tom and Jerry. That's the only time when I can expect them to sit still.Anyway I started the sketch and midway I decided not to draw any kind of feature because I thought it would take longer than 10 mins. I wanted to ask you one thing. Are we supposed to do the observation and and sketching all in 10 mins.by the way the whole sketch took 10 mins

Now the self assesment part.I will start with the things I was not happy with.
1. again I had tough time determining values In fact i was so busy keeping my line drawing correct that I did not concentrate on the value.
2. I think it is also possible to depict form with marks.I tried to do that on the sitting part of the sofa.I wanted to show the rounded edge but I was not able to give the impression of even the flat sitting part of the sofa.
3.The legs and hands could were not appealing though i think they do give the impression oflegs on over the other.

Now the part i am happy with:
the only part i am happy is that I was able to give the feeling of a small boy sitting in big sofa.I took advice and kept on relating to the various proportions and so i think I did a satisfactory job here.What do you think? Was i able to convey the feeling of a 4 years old boy sitting on a two sitter sofa?

The second drawing is of a cup.-5mins
I choose this subject in order to be able to concentrate on the values but i failed to draw even the lines correctly. some how I felt tired of of doping this sketch I know I did not give my utmost attention in configuring the forms.

This whole excercise feels very tiring and it seems I am not able to do two sketches one after another.I feel drained but after few mintues when I see these sketches I like the feeling.I feel that i have created somthing which is not a copy but my interpretation of whatever is there.for instance I could have ignored the sofa and the sitting posture of my son and gone for his features instead but.i went for the posture and even the sketch is not perfect it does give me the satisfaction of seeing that moment from my point of view and I really liked it.

I would be eagerly waiting for your input.
Bye
PalPal - you have again done really well with your evaluation - I think you're going to turn into the star student for effort on evaluation!

First of all sketching from life is much more tiring that drawing from a photograph. Don't be surprised if you feel tired. One of the other reasons for starting with quickies is it enables people to appreciate how much concentration and focus is required to be able to draw. So feeling tired is the right result and it means I know you're really making the right sort of effort.

I'm really pleased that you get more of sense of these sketches being about you rather than a copying exercise. That's another good result - and the feeling gets better and better the more you learn how to sketch and draw the things in your life (ie it's your life and your image not somebody else's image) which is why drawing from life is so addictive once you get into it!

When you set yourself a time limit, you have to do the observation and the sketch in that time limit (again - as it would be if you were in a life class). While sketching outside, some of the things you see will be stationery whereas others will be there for a little while and will them move on. If you learn how to observe and get the key info down fast you'll be able to have a 'richer' content in your sketches

You did exactly right to go for the overall form and to leave the details of the face.

Hatching/shading to get form while sketching is something that comes with time. In general try to shade in sympathy with the grain of whatever you are sketching. Below is a pen and ink sketch I did some years ago - but it's a good example for showing how the way I lay down the hatching lines helps to describe the form. Look at the folds on the curtain, the base of the lamp, the front of the base of the chair. Do you see what I mean?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/48045-Web_Chloes-chair.jpg

Becoming expert at hatching in a way which suggests form is one of the key skills of the sketcher. it's a very economical way to draw as you create value and shape at the same time. It's not about what feels comfortable for you, it's about what does the sketch ask you to do.

Don't worry about your second sketch - what I did find pleasing about that one is that you recognise the elipses are off. Why not have another go at it when you're feeling fresher? You'll find as you practice more and develop your observational sketching 'muscle' you will feel less tired - bit it is very tiring to start with if you're doing it right. Most of the effort comes from the observation.

(Melisa - you might want to study this sketch from the point of view of sketching interiors in pen and ink. BTW, this sketch took me a good couple of hours as I went slowly until I got the shapes drawn in correctly. There is absolutely no correction in this sketch - what you see is what went down the first time - and there is no pencil underdrawing. If I draw it the way I normally do now, I would have spot marked where I thought different lines should be before I drew them in. Sketching is mostly about observation but is also about drawing slowly sometimes as well as developing an ability to draw fast)

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 03:46 AM
Katherine this is another quick one of about 8 min. My assessment on this is that it shows my insecurity with the hatching and the quick sketching. The lines in my table are not straight and the perspective is probably off. You can tell I don't know how to hatch yet and I had trouble with the leaves of the plant . On the left side it was easier to go from the tip to the stem and on the right from the stem to the tip. Still, I have no control with defined lines. 3b wooden pencil on Canson Sketchbook.Mary - drawing straight lines without a ruler is a key skill of a sketcher - and if you're not used to doing it, it's not going to arrive straight away. So don't worry about that - but when you're not doing anything in particular practice drawing straight lines! :)

Being able to hatch is also another very useful skill which comes with practice (although it's by no means the only way of developing tone for a sketcher) My favourite doodle for years now has been hatching a shape with no external boundary line to develop and keep my control with hatching.

Given your artistic style I'd expect you to want to sketch in a less conventional way and a way which fits with your unique way of seeing things. Sketch the way that feels right for you. You will succeed with this class if you find a way of sketching which is about you and the way you see the world. It doesn't have to be representational in the conventional sense.

(Note: The same goes for anybody else who leans towards abstraction and creativity - your personal emphasis with this class needs to be on finding a signature style as well as getting comfortable with sketching outside where there's lots of source material for your creativity)

Why not take a look at Henry Moore's methods for developing tone? Forexample, take a look at his 1974 drawing "The artist's hands" and his version of hatching http://www.henry-moore-fdn.co.uk/matrix_engine/content.php?page_id=1278

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 04:04 AM
Here are three sketches of about 6 sketches I did today. The first is a 5 minute sketch with a fine Sharpie of my stove, with dirty pots and pans on it, as well as a spray bottle of kitchen cleaner, a can of olive oil spray, and a plastic bag with apples in it. Using the pen made me fiddle less, but it leaked through two pages underneath. I'm using an inexpensive sketch pad because I don't want to use good paper. I didn't get much done in 5 minutes did I!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/20035-stove.jpg
I think this is a super sketch. Very good observation and you have sketched a scene! You have overlapping objects and relationships going on which means you have to pay attention to relative proportions within the whole as well as for individual items. You've also focused on overall contours within the timescale rather than trying to define further their form which is fine given the time limit you set yourself. I think it's a great little sketch! Well done :clap::clap::clap::thumbsup:The second is my Christmas cactus, pen, 10 minute sketch. I looked for something small with an interesting shape. It WAS small, but hard to draw in 10 minutes. I roughed it out in pencil, and ended up just scribbling the leaves to get it done on time. This one leaked through also.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/20035-cactus.jpg
I think you need to commit to doing a sketch with one implement from start to finish. Sketching is very much about getting it down right first time. Practising your drawing with quickies is about helping you to develop confidence about how much you can draw in the time limit you set. What's interesting about this one is positioning on the page and it makes me wonder if you looked at how big it was and where the top of the pot ought to come on the page before you started drawing.The third is my new handbag that I bought yesterday (half price!). This one is in pencil and took 15 minutes. The most difficult part was getting the strap right, and getting it to cross in front of the bag in the right places. I think it came out rather well for a line drawing. You can see that I'm taking the whole time to get a line drawing and have not had time to do any shading.

I learned that I'm S-L-O-W, but I already knew that. I actually become indecisive when I try to be quick, and that makes for awkward, choppy looking drawings.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/20035-bag.jpg
Don't worry about being slow when trying to do quickies. That's not a problem. The more you draw and the more you gain confidence the more speed you will gain and then you'll be able to get more done. but you need to do lots of quickies to get the hand/eye co-ordination thing going. Same comment as before re positining - but ignore this if it's just how you croppe the scan.

Curves of straps are very difficult to do - I think you've done well with this one.

Can you see how being drawing slowly might mean you need to think very carefully when selecting subjects outside? And it might also make you feel more nervous about sketching in public. Have you noticed how some of the other students are saying they're noticing they're getting quicker the more quickie sketches they do?

I recommend an extra dose of quickies for you. It'll help you to speed up and then assignments 2 and 3 will be that much more enjoyable for you.

robynsin
06-08-2006, 04:16 AM
Such stunning sketches - one after the other! Bravo Everyone:clap::clap:
I had a really bad day yesterday - total loss of confidence. Wasn't going to post anymore, but then decided that is selfish, someone else might be encouraged by seeing how hard I'm finding this.

Katherine - I love your ink hatching style, so am going to press on in that direction having been to Arezzo yesterday to buy the 'magic' brown ink:D

The quick pen sketch of the stove was to see if I could commit to a single line. Now I just have to straighten 'em out! The drawing of our front door was in the pits of my lack of confidence - I scribbled graphite over the page for 70 minutes and almost gave up on sketching. So now I'm off to practice hatching.....
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/66219-stove.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/66219-door.jpg
robyn

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 04:24 AM
Viv, Jeanette and Anita - lovely sketches!

Viv - you need no comments from me whatsoever and, as an expert sketcher, I'm more than happy with you offering advice to people as well. I wonder if maybe when we get outside it might help if we explain a bit more about how we go about working out what to sketch and the short cuts we take

I like the Tippex tip - I can see that one racing around the sketching fraternity now given the number of views this class is getting!

(:wave: Hello Lurkers!:cat:)

Jeanette - you know I love your sketches, it's why you're on my blogroll! Your rabbit is wonderful as he is - please don't do anything to him - except maybe do him again!
Those Graphitints worked very well! And good choice of subject - something which moves but tends to stay still for a period of time

Anita - sketching is fine, self-assessment is a bit 'thin'! ;) I actually like your second people sketch better than your 30 minute one. The last one feels to me like you maybe kept restating what you'd got without moving it forward - is that about right?

When sketching people, watch them carefully for a bit. There is always an anxiety to get going but it pays to watch whether they have a routine set of movements - and a lot of people do. Sketching artists is easy as they go
look into distance
pick up implement
frown
squiggle on paper,
stretch and stare at it
frown
look into the distance
another squiggle on the paper
stare at paper
frown
etc ad infinitumWhen you see people on sketchcrawls you'd be amazed at how many are sitting there drawing one another!

kwint
06-08-2006, 04:27 AM
i must ask ... what is this magic substance, Tippex? And is it only available in the UK? I have not heard of it in California ... but then, I lead a sheltered life! <g>

Karen

Striver
06-08-2006, 04:54 AM
Robyn (Italy)
Please stay and keep me company, I have many ege bege's. A real novice at this please hold my hand and encourage me.
Hey that is a nice entrance and door.
Cheers
Les

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:00 AM
i must ask ... what is this magic substance, Tippex? And is it only available in the UK? I have not heard of it in California ... but then, I lead a sheltered life! <g>

KarenKaren - if I called it Sno-pake would that make more sense to you?

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:08 AM
Somebody said something in a past post about dirty dishes, so before I stuck mine into the dishwasher this afternoon, I quickly set up a still life. It got me thinking about finished paintings that are not just beautiful table settings, but day to day chores. I am working to see quick images and capture a 5 min composition.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jun-2006/30341-sketch_6:7:06.jpg

This is a great sketch Robin - lovely composition with the repetition of shapes.

Folks - we haven't got into 'making pictures' when sketching yet but one of the things to look out for when composing a picture is similar shapes. This quickie sketch by Robin has lots of regular elipses with the crockery and glasses and then another irrgular natural elipse at the base of the pear.

Nice one Robin! Your special task from now on is to talk about why you chose a particular view when you sketch!
Continuing to capture people, this was at the ice rink. Occasionally I can capture the face of a parent, but usually they are watching the ice. I wish I could sketch the skaters... but talk about movement.
Just keep going - capturing movement is so difficult but comes with practice. Maybe try people walking first?

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:10 AM
...but no guarantees on converting. :angel:

Thanks for your kind words.
Joe:D.........but you want to "be an angel" Joe! You know you do! ;):D

kennychaffin
06-08-2006, 06:15 AM
....continued from previous post...

6) Trombones. now i figured i should concentrate on the things that jump out of the scene, i did this just to capture the relationship between the trombonists. not very realistic, but i didn't care. i think i got their position well for a few minute drawing.

At this point, i'm now getting much braver. i started to sketch the girl sitting in front of me. didn't get 2 lines drawn and she turned around and looked straight at me. i froze! :eek: i quickly turned the page and that was the end of that sketch...lol! i need lots more work on sketching in public, obviously.

7) the school. this one took about 10 minutes while i was sitting in the car, waiting for the rest of the family to leave the concert.

thanks, Katherine for putting this course together. i've been wanting to get over the life sketching hump for a while, and this certainly gives me a start. i hope when others get to sketching in public, this little story will relate. there's safety in numbers...lol!

The trombone sketch is quite good.
KAC

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:39 AM
.......I know, I know....it's not in "The Lesson Plan", but I'm a color junkie and I couldn't help myself.

JamieJamie - since you work from colour so much I'm just wondering whether trying to sketch just in graphite for a bit might give you some fresh insight into your colour work.

I know that doing a drawing class in just graphite each week really helps to keep me on track with the rest of my artwork. It's my other bit of "doing scales" in the context of the pianist/singer analogy.

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:44 AM
Too many new entrys to comment on. But everyone is doing really good work:) So Present You are a Startbucky along with Robin? Sounds to me like you three should organise a Starbucks Sketchcrawl with Wally! :D

John - are you using PS? Have you tried upping the contrast just a tad before posting and then we'll see your images better.

Mary Woodul
06-08-2006, 06:52 AM
Thank you, Katherine! Those hands in the link are phenomenal, gorgoeus and I just don't know how to describe them. That style of shading is what I want to do. I will have me pad with me at all times to practice that and lines before tackling the next sketch. Thank you also Katherine for the time you take to C&C each of our drawings. I think this will be an unforgettable experience for all of us.

Wish I could comment on everyone's sketches, everyone is doing so well.

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:55 AM
I learned I am not very good at this. I did go out of my comfort zone. I usually use mechanical pencils in an upright position using the point. This time I used a regular pencil on its side. Very uncomfortable for me, but on the point I usually work on detail and not speed. Also I usually use a grid and draw from photos. Jeanne - well done for solving the image upload problem.

What you're experiencing is very common amongst people who have never drawn from life - and the solution is to look very carefully at what you're trying to draw and then have a go. As you do more and more you'll find that you get better. But don't let yourself off the hook of practising otherwise you won't get the improvement.

What percentage of the time are you looking at your subject as opposed to looking at your page? If you spend too much time looking at your page, you're not spending enough time looking at the subject. Remember people who sketch look like those nodding dogs you see in cars - heads are continually bobbing - you should be aiming to have your head up and really looking at least a third of the time

look at the subject
make a mark
look back at subject and check mark
correct or extend mark
look back at subject and check mark
etc

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:57 AM
J
Are'nt the sketches great.
Perhaps tomorrow, I seem to have a temperature at the moment.
Back to dozy land
LesHope you're feeling much better really soon Les!

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 06:59 AM
You cat people should have a lazy dog. They go to sleep and don't move for long periods. Cats sleep a lot as well - especially when they get older - but one of mine always seems to hear me picking up the pencil and opens her eyes!

Are we going to see some sleeping dog sketches?

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 07:06 AM
Mike - well done! :thumbsup::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

That story about your sketching in public is exactly what most people feel like when starting out - especially if they're sketching people. Thank you for telling the story and showing us all your sketches as well - that was very brave of you! I loved the way you got into it and the drawing got better!

You occasionally get somebody who stares back at you. Most are just curious but some do glare! You did exactly the right thing if they don't look like they're smiling, just turn the page and start something else.

Do you go to life class at all?

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 07:13 AM
I had a really bad day yesterday - total loss of confidence. Wasn't going to post anymore, but then decided that is selfish, someone else might be encouraged by seeing how hard I'm finding this.

The quick pen sketch of the stove was to see if I could commit to a single line. Now I just have to straighten 'em out! The drawing of our front door was in the pits of my lack of confidence - I scribbled graphite over the page for 70 minutes and almost gave up on sketching. So now I'm off to practice hatching.....

robynRobyn - I can see a big improvement between yesterday and today.

First off - it's very impressive when somebody who likes to keep outling and retracing steps can draw with one single line and get it right. Your drawing of your oven is excellent! You're going to be giving RobinN a run for her money!;)

Your drawing of the front door is the first sketch I've seen that has properly tackled darks - which is something lots of people tend to skip when sketching - but strengthening the darks is what often makes the difference between an indifferent sketch and a good sketch.

You're going in the right direction - just practice, practice, practice!

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 07:31 AM
i must ask ... what is this magic substance, Tippex? And is it only available in the UK? I have not heard of it in California ... but then, I lead a sheltered life! <g>

KarenKaren - I am reliably informed by Judy Pinkrybns that Americans would know Tippex as

either

White Out! made by Bic
http://www.jcu.edu.au/school/bsg/bs/stores/images/11-0225%20CORRECT%20FLUID%20LIQUID%20PAPER.jpeg

or Liquid Paper made by Papermate
http://img.epinions.com/images/opti/73/ce/3074072CPAP9040-resized200.jpg[/quote]

Makes sense now?

Judi1957
06-08-2006, 07:37 AM
Did a couple indoors as the rain had been non-stop.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/37258-2.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/37258-3.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/37258-4.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/37258-5.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/37258-6.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/37258-7.jpg

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 07:46 AM
Wow, everyone got so far ahead of me already. So many drawings, so little time. So here's my assignment 1 and part of assignment 2..........Impact? I felt rushed and pressured. I was fine with it, but I also chose subjects I'm very familiar with.Julie - I think these are the first sketches I've seen of your work - is that right?

Everybody started at a different point in terms of existing skills. Nobody has got ahead of you and there's no need to rush, just slow down a bit and keep doing quickies a bit longer.

Ideally, what I'd like is for everybody to feel calm, relaxed and confident doing things which are unfamiliar to them before they move on to the next stage.

Each stage ups the anxiety levels in terms of what people are used to dealing with - so I'd like to try and avoid any cumulative stress level buld up before we get to what is, for many people, the really anxiety provoking stage of sketching in public.

So there's no need for you to get into assignment 2 just yet. The people who are sketching in public already are mainly people who have done this before and who want to develop their skills.

What I asked people to do is to increase the amount of time they spent doing quick sketches as they progressed. That way people begin to get a much better understanding of what they might be able to select as a subject outside and then have a chance of sketching it reasonably well.

Why not try a bigger interior scene next? Also try working on your value range as well - and different ways of creating value tones.

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 07:58 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/46919-ripley-brn-paper.jpg

I am also determined to try to do something to get out of my comfort zone. So, I rarely draw with colored pencil and hardly ever on tinted paper...........
Self assessment: overall I think the anatomy of the dog is OK. I like how the forelegs turned out and I spent much of the time on them. I wish that I had given more thought to variable line weight. Also, I didn't do anything to "ground" her on a carpet. She could just be doing a very strange ballet in the air.
Karen - getting out of the confort zone is what we like to see!:clap::clap::clap:

So do we just call him Diva Ripley from now on? ;):D

Folks: One of the big thresholds in sketching is moving from "sketching the object" to "sketching the object within its context" - so that the latter becomes a comfortable approach. This latter stage is the one which has the potential for enormous beneficial impact on our paintings. Now we already know that Karen can sketch in context because of her excellent pen and ink drawings and the way in which she described what to do.

What's interesting about this sketch for me - in terms of messages for others - is that it's also totally OK to retreat to a previous stage of sketching (ie subject only) when feeling your way into the use of new media and a new support. Expect new challanges as you move from one media to the next and don't get worried if suddenly you want to do a more basic sketch.

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 08:03 AM
Wow Judy - you had some complicated challenges in some of those sketches - and tackled them well! :clap::clap::clap:

How are you finding the experience?

what do you think you've done well?
what do you think you could improve on?
what have you learned?

[Edit: I've just looked at them again - and Karen's comment has just prompted me to wonder what you're drawing with as there is a certain sameness to the quality of line. If you're interested, you might to try and focus on lost and found edges and line/edge quality while sketching]

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 08:15 AM
Thank you, Katherine! Those hands in the link are phenomenal, gorgoeus and I just don't know how to describe them. That style of shading is what I want to do. I will have me pad with me at all times to practice that and lines before tackling the next sketch.
Mary - It suddenly occurred to me that I needed to find somebody who you might relate to more - glad to see it worked!:) I'm now desprately trying to think of other artists whose sketches you might find stimulating!

Oh - and I've been very silly! This is one you might like a lot.......these aren't sketches but this link is Deanna Petherbridge's bio and some drawings - she used to be Professor of Drawing at the Royal College of Art. Click on the drawings - they come up bigger. (RobinN - you might well like these too)
http://www.acid.uwe.ac.uk/dpether.htm

Thank you also Katherine for the time you take to C&C each of our drawings. I think this will be an unforgettable experience for all of us.My pleasure Mary - I hope people are seeing it as all being part of the confidence building process. However the time for me to do this is going to be very variable - I'm out in town at exhibitions all day tomorrow for example and I'm on a Drawing Day all day on Saturday.

What I would like to stress is the reason I'm commenting in some detail is that sketching can be a huge step forward for people in terms of developing their very own drawing identity so everybody needs their own comment that's particular to them - interspersed by comments applicable to everybody.

Plus I never realised how much I had completely intermalised until I started doing this class! It's quite good for me to have to explain things and remind myself sometimes! :rolleyes:

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 08:25 AM
JayD has just announced in another thread that he has been sketching and will be posting his sketches later today :thumbsup:

[And this is just so he knows that I know.........and then he'll know what I'll be thinking if he doesn't! :evil:]

mmdm
06-08-2006, 09:22 AM
I am however a bit confused as to what was your eyeline.
Do you actually work out where your eyeline is and mark it on your paper when you sketch and perspective is involved?

No, I didn't mark the eyeline, bu it was midway between the counter top and the upper cabinets. About level with the stove knobs. I'm having hip and SSI problems and can't stand for very long, so I was in a chair at a slight angle to the stove. That's why I could see both the top of the counter and the underside of the cabinets. It was an odd viewpoint, I know, but the best I could do in that tiny room.

I should be able to sketch outdoors for a couple of hours but won't be able to do it until Saturday, when I have some transportation. Nothing here but dead grass and ugly ranch style houses at the moment. A few weeks ago I had flowers everywhere, but nothing now. I'm going to try some at the park. I did actually attempt some while I was there a couple of weeks ago (this class is so timely) which was my absolute first time to ever try sketching anything outside of my house. You can see my attempts here -
http://www.virtuallydesigned.com/gottamake/gallery/v/sketchbook/?g2_GALLERYSID=011598146282ee4f35dcfb4e4655ad4c
I know they aren't very good but I was very pleased to have finally made a start on something I've been wanting to do for years. Starting is the hardest part!

Robyn - Don't you dare give up and leave! There are obviously some here who are already expert sketchers, (and it is very intimidating to see those sketches on the same thread as mine!) but we can't compare our beginning efforts to their experienced work. Anyway, I really like your doorway sketch a lot. What don't you like about it? I'll bet it looks a lot better to you today, when you can see it fresh. I think it's lovely.

mmdm
06-08-2006, 09:27 AM
Oh, meant to say that I LOVE that Henry Moore hands sketch. Such wild hatching, yet it doesn't look the least bit sloppy. Did you notice that it was based on carbon tracings of photographs? Shame on him, LOL! But I was wondering at first how he managed to draw BOTH hands at the same time! With his toes, maybe? I love the way he hatched and shaded this with such emotion. He probably COULD have sketched with his toes, if he'd wanted.:lol:

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 09:35 AM
Melisa - sorry if you're finding any of the sketches intimidating. With a class which is mixed interms of both abilities, training and experience it's always going to be the case that you're going to get a varying standard.

But do try to bear in mind that we all started from the same place, everybody can draw, everybody can improve their drawing and what is intimidating to some is inspirational to others.

The big challenge for this class is for students to improve their confidence about what they can do

Are you looking for a 'pretty picture'? That's not the purpose of assignment 2.

What you need to get used with assignment 2 is:

weather - and the sun moving and the shadows changing
finding something to sit outside on - which given the hip/SSI problems we need to try and make sure you're comfortable about before you're 'public'
trying to frame a view when there aren't four line around it all the time.It honestly doesn't matter what you draw and tract houses will do just fine. Maybe you could try sitting at your front door and draw the view opposite?

Katherine T
06-08-2006, 09:37 AM
Oh, meant to say that I LOVE that Henry Moore hands sketch. Such wild hatching, yet it doesn't look the least bit sloppy. Did you notice that it was based on carbon tracings of photographs? Shame on him, LOL! But I was wondering at first how he managed to draw BOTH hands at the same time! With his toes, maybe? I love the way he hatched and shaded this with such emotion. He probably COULD have sketched with his toes, if he'd wanted.:lol:It's great isn't it. It's wild but also controlled at the same time. That's where practising just making marks on paper comes in.

Sketches can use photos - it's just that this class isn't! ;)

Did you know that some of the Degas pastels are based on photos? But the way he converted them into paintings is completely based on observation from life.

JayD
06-08-2006, 09:38 AM
Ok, here are two of my five minute sketches and the self evaluation (I cannot spell accessment).

I exist in a world of lenses--I am obsessed with optics--I have telescopes, camera, binoculars, magnifying glasse--if it has a lens I have it--I think this is because I am extremely nearsighted and my drawings exist within this world. I take my own photos and I draw from them--within the safety of my office where I can proper study a subject.

On these sketches, I did one while my wife was reading an e-book and the other is one of my birds (which are protected, as best as I can, on my property). I am also chasing a rogue squirrel to sketch but he's a bit harder to snag.

One note: I regularly monitor my blood pressure and this outdoor activity has had some positive effects on the blood pressure.

I think my sketching may be too loose and maybe a bit disorganized. The sketch of my wife was not a problem but sketching the bird was--I also made a serious tactical mistake in that my pencil was a .03mm mechanical pencil. Lesson learned and am moving on. Here are my first two submissions. More will follow:

Anita Murphy
06-08-2006, 09:45 AM
I am going to try the in context thing at my lunch break today. Did a couple of quickies this morning in the cafeteria at work. I'll post those later.
Katherine - I am very bad at public self assessment without it become self-assassination! I'll do better next time! :)

Fireman's kid
06-08-2006, 09:54 AM
Wow!! This thread is fantastic and Katherine, I am amazed each time by the new information and links you have added since I was last here. I am finding it all immensly helpful since I am pretty new to sketching.

Mike, I loved your sketching commentary. :lol: I think we've all experienced something similar.

So I did as promised and sketched at the dentist's office while my kids had their teeth cleaned. I used a pen to keep me from fiddling. This is my second time sketching with a pen and I do find it works better with me. I have to commit to the lines I put down whether I like them or not so it helps me to move forward on the sketch instead of continuing to work one area.

I did have a moment of panic when one person sat right next to me (the arms of our chairs touched :eek: ), but I perservered. :angel:

First the sketch and then my evaluation of it...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31442-WC_102_L3_dentist_office.jpg

The chair at the bottom edge of the page was almost touching my knees so I did want it to run off the page. I started with the lamp since that was my highest point and I wanted to make sure the lamp shade wasn't off the top of the page. Unfortunately, my first "straight" line was at an angle so the whole sketch was angled. :D I am pretty happy with the front chair and lamp. I really tried to concentrate on positioning. By the time I got to the back chair I realized I had a headache and was losing my focus. I think that is pretty easy to see.

Oh, one other thing...I do need to work on my hatching especially when using a pen. Sometimes it appears too bold. For this sketch I used a .3 Micron pen.

Thanks to everyone for making this a great thread and a safe place to share our sketches.

gibson99
06-08-2006, 09:59 AM
katherine - I love your drawing of the dog on the Chair, absolutly beautiful. I have a question. When you start to hatch, for example on the chair, How do you decide the direction of the hatch. I noticed that also you have some crosshatching too. What kind of pen and Ink? What size is the drawing? I know I am being awful nosey, but I really admire pen and ink drawings like this:)

Irene Prior
06-08-2006, 10:25 AM
Katherine...before I forget I just wanted to tell you "Thank You" for putting together such a wonderful and detailed sketching class. Everybody seems to be doing such a wonderful job.

Here are the last two days of 5 minute sketches. Some in pencil and 3 in pen. I found when scanning the pencil it didn't pickup the pencil mark, so I switched to pen. By using the pen it really forced me to go slow and concentrate on the mark I was making.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-Sophies-face-in-Pencil-060.gif

This was done in pencil. My dog Sophie just wouldn't sit still for me to do a drawing of her. I did this in about 6 minutes in pencil.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-table-with-books-in-pencil.gif

This is a contour drawing done in pencil in less then 5 minutes. Working on getting portions right.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-TV-in-pencil.gif

Contour drawing of my TV. I'm hoping with practice my hand gets steady and straight lines become straight. Really focused on keeping my eyes on the TV while I drew it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-Nordstrom-Bag-in-pencil.gif

Busy day of shopping. Contour drawing of Nordstrom bag. Two minute sketch.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-corner-wall-in-pencil.gif

Bedroom corner. Done in pencil. Hand some problems with getting the perspective right. 5 minute drawing

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-pencil-shaperner-done-in-pe.gif

I decided to switch to a Faber-castell fine point marker. I'm trying to get away from my comfort zone with the pencil. Using the marker forced me to go slow, paying attention to small detail knowing that I couldn't erase my mistakes.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-Sophie-napping-pencil-drawi.gif

Sophie finally settled down so attempted a pencil drawing. I'm having problems with figuring out how much detail to put in or how much detail to leave out.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-TV-remote-in-pen.gif

I feel like I'm hitting the bottom of the barrel of stuff to draw in my bedroom. Did this TV remote in about 3 minutes...contour drawing done in pen.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-various-5-minute-sketches-0.gif

Various quick sketches. Focused on keeping my eyes on object drawing.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/31201-Sophie-quick-5-minute-or-le.gif

Quick sketches of Sophie moving around. Total time 5 minutes.

I'm finding the more I sketch I seem to be seeing detail more clearly. Trying to focus on how much detail I want to put in. I really like doing contour drawings.

Irene:wave:

mmdm
06-08-2006, 10:48 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2006/9614-cupmouse.jpg

This took way to long. It was sitting in front of me on the computer desk and I thought I'd keep an eye on the pc clock for time, but my screensaver came on and the clock disappeared. That should have been a clue. :lol: I'll try some in the kitchen, living area later because I can set the kitchen timer for those and won't get too absorbed and overdo. Also, I had a terrible urge to smudge and blend when I finished, but resisted for now. This is ebony pencil, because it shows up a bit better than graphite.

I find the more experienced sketches both intimidating AND inspirational at the same time. I wouldn't want to miss seeing them. Just have to keep reminding myself that they started where I am starting. (And if it ain't so, don't tell me!) I love the one you did of the chair, Karen's dog, all the others, too.

I was wondering, how important is it to time the outdoor sketches? I hunted around and found my watch. It had never been reset when the time changed because I haven't worn it since then. Got it set and ready now and if we really need to time the outdoor ones, I will do my best to remember to take it.

Irene - We both have Sophie dogs! :)