PDA

View Full Version : "Bubbles"


jacx1938
05-22-2006, 09:26 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-May-2006/82590-Bubbles.jpg

This is the only self portrait I've ever done. It incorporates a lot of different elements in my life. Enjoy. C and C welcome.

Jim

Mike_Beeman
05-22-2006, 09:48 AM
Jim,
This is a different approach to a self portrait...and I have to say, very well done. I would like to see more of the upper left hand part, if possible...and what is the size?
Mike

Dark_Shades
05-22-2006, 11:58 AM
Indeed it is wonderful....... a brilliant concept...... I too wish we could have some close ups.............but all of it :)

jacx1938
05-22-2006, 12:26 PM
Mike and Dark shades, It was around 18 by 24 inches I think. Sorry, this is the only shot I have of it, but I'm glad you like it.

Jim.

Tressa
05-22-2006, 02:57 PM
Very intriguing Jim, and I'm sure we could all sit here for hours, and try to comtemplate the meaning behind some of this:D Are you depicting yourself as a "shadow artist" because you did so much work at others' direction for so long? And are you ready to pop the bubbles and let yourself jump in the sandbox and play?? hmmm....I could go on and on....very well done!!
Tres

Bhavana Vijay
05-22-2006, 03:18 PM
Wonderful painting, i agree, very intriguing! Your take on the meaning is very interesting Tress!:)

PeggyB
05-22-2006, 03:33 PM
One word:
MARVELOUS!
well a few more words - it is an intriguing departure from your usual work - loose, abstract, but still tells a story - just not a story we can easily interpret, and that's part of the charm.

Peggy

jacx1938
05-22-2006, 03:53 PM
Tressa, Bhavi, and Peggy, the real depth of imagination I have, remained mostly dormant when I did commissioned portraits for money. In rebellion, I would paint "breakout" pieces like this one, where I really let my imagination go to work. I have another one of a woman trapped in a wall while holding out a key to us, which I will post here down the line.

Thank you all for your kind comments. This kind of art is narrative and tells a story - Tressa, your ideas on it are perceptive - but. of course, the viewer must discover it in terms of their own experiences. Too bad I couldn't have made a living just doing this kind of portrait. I would have been in hog heaven!

Jim.

jacx1938
05-22-2006, 04:17 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-May-2006/82590-Changing_Seasons.jpg

Here's another example of my weird imagination. Most people paint "pretty" pictures of the passing seasons, but I painted this semi-abstract and sold it to a psychologist in Idaho. (grin) For better or worse, this stuff is "my" art.

judwal
05-22-2006, 06:39 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-May-2006/82590-Changing_Seasons.jpg

Here's another example of my weird imagination. Most people paint "pretty" pictures of the passing seasons, but I painted this semi-abstract and sold it to a psychologist in Idaho. (grin) For better or worse, this stuff is "my" art.
Beautiful, stunning, fabulous...I could go on and on!

jacx1938
05-22-2006, 07:07 PM
Judy, I love the little girl and "Tide's in." Keep up the good work and thanks for viewing.

Jim.

Shane Keene
05-23-2006, 01:22 AM
Very nice. Reminiscent (for me) of Marc Chagall.

jacx1938
05-23-2006, 02:12 AM
Thanks for dropping by, and for your kind comment. Appreciate it.

Jim.

Karin Skold
05-23-2006, 02:39 AM
Wow !
I def. love this! It is different and the bubbles are fantastic.
Great work !
Karin:clap:

jacx1938
05-23-2006, 04:03 AM
Thanks Karin. I also like the old car in graphite. Thanks for dropping by.

Jim.

PeggyB
05-23-2006, 01:11 PM
[quote]Here's another example of my weird imagination. Most people paint "pretty" pictures of the passing seasons, but I painted this semi-abstract and sold it to a psychologist in Idaho. (grin) For better or worse, this stuff is "my" art.[quote]

For better - definitely for better. I could look at either of these two paintings over and over, and "read" a different story each time. Since this last one sold, you obviously can sell "your" art. Probably not as fast as the traditional portraiture though - too bad the public is so "photographic" minded.

Peggy

Mikki Petersen
05-23-2006, 03:03 PM
I'm spellbound! The mind boggles at your wonderful imagination and ability to express it.

Mikki

jacx1938
05-23-2006, 04:15 PM
Thank you Peggy and Mikki.

Mikki, imagination is like a muscle. If you exercise it, it will grow. Here's an exercise that will help. In writing, a simile is created when the writer finds a common quality that somehow connects unlike objects. The comparison of the two, reveals a truth.

Example: "Darkness is just like your paycheck...it doesn't cover everything."

You can do the same thing visually. Your ego will scream bloody murder as you haul it out of its normal comfort zone - lets just do things the same old way, we already know how to do that; DON'T try anything new, you might FAIL, etc.

It's scary taking risks, but it's the only way to create something new, that is yours alone, instead of just endlessly copying nature. Lets go create!

Jim.

Mikki Petersen
05-23-2006, 11:11 PM
Oh, now you've gone and given me the shakes! Asking me to leave my comfort zone...shame on you. Actually I've done a bit of playing with abstraction, usually just to kick start my juices flowing but not with any message in mind. I'm a color junky and sometimes I just have to play with the colors, ya know?

I expect you are right about the imagination muscle...mine goes into overdrive with things like cloud monsters and, I swear, I can't look at a grouping of rocks without seeing animals sculpted there. What you've done with your paintings is highly sophisticated...I'm still seeing Puff the Magic Dragon everywhere.

Mikki

jacx1938
05-24-2006, 01:28 AM
Mikki, the basic idea is to use a "freeing-up" exercise to get you away from those hard edges. All the emotions we feel - love, hate, fear, etc - have no edges, but they do possess movement. I learned that when I achieved my goal of getting a good "likeness" of the physical thing in nature, there was no new challenge in doing it over and over again.

I began losing my entrhusiasm about "copying" nature because I realized it was only technique and wasn't coming from inside. I wasn't tapping into the deep emotions inside of me. I had to start learning how to "create." Do you know Georgia O'keefe's art? She said the only way she could get free of her emotional response to a subject, was to figure out a way to paint that response - not just copy the physical object itself.

I'm not saying you should forsake realism and paint abstracts, but I'm saying, if you look at your work and consistently aren't satisfied with the results, then you must figure out how to capture some of the emotional qualities as well as the physical. That involves experimentation and risks. (grin) Good luck. If I can help any, let me know.

Jim.

maddy777
05-24-2006, 07:25 AM
Jim LOVE 'Bubbles' :D

jacx1938
05-24-2006, 07:54 AM
Thanks Maddy. Please visit my art blog listed below for more of the same.

Jim

sassybird
05-24-2006, 11:50 AM
For breakout pieces they are wonderful. I hate commission work and rarely do any more these days. It is so much more fun to let my imagination run wild. Your imagination is great:D

Laura Shelley
05-24-2006, 01:47 PM
Mikki, the basic idea is to use a "freeing-up" exercise to get you away from those hard edges. All the emotions we feel - love, hate, fear, etc - have no edges, but they do possess movement. I learned that when I achieved my goal of getting a good "likeness" of the physical thing in nature, there was no new challenge in doing it over and over again.



You put that well. I like your style, speaking in more ways than one!

I'm also feeling in a bit of a rut with commissioned portraits, though I'm not exactly overwhelmed with work at the moment! I plan to do several larger portraits of my family members in a much freer style and discover what else I can do with the human face. All I can lose is a little time and a few sheets of paper. :lol:

Laura

jacx1938
05-24-2006, 02:27 PM
Thanks for dropping by Laura. I'd be interested in seeing what develops with your facial experiments.

Jim.