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Flash
03-02-2002, 10:22 AM
Can brushes be used for both mediums as long as they are cleaned properly?

Albert L.
03-02-2002, 06:53 PM
Yes. I do that. When you paint with acrylics, look that you clean the brush with water as often as possible during you paint, so that the colour will not dry on your brush. That's important so that you can use the brush for a long time. :)

guillot
03-02-2002, 10:05 PM
I personally do not use my brushes for both mediums. Acrylics are more difficult to clean from a brush than oils are, and it still tends to stick in there somewhat. I've always been told to keep the brushes separate. Also, sometimes people use different cleansers for acrylics than they do oils, and we all know that different cleansers affect brushes in various ways.

I guess you could. But I don't believe that I would recommend it.

paintfool
03-02-2002, 11:16 PM
Although i have done it in emergency situations i would prefer not too. It seems to me that acrylics tend to fray them a bit. Could be my imagination though. I spend quite a bit on my oil brushes and not so much on ones to be used on acrylics. Mind you i don't really do to much with acrylic.

Flash
03-04-2002, 10:00 AM
Thanks for the info on brushes everyone.

Another question though, what types of brushes should I buy for oil, natural synthetic? Why would I buy one verses the other?

Thanks:D

G.L. Hoff
03-04-2002, 10:47 AM
Originally posted by Flash
Can brushes be used for both mediums as long as they are cleaned properly?

Generally not recommended. Acrylics can plug the bristles in good hog brushes and ruin the snap and shape, unless you're very very careful. Natural bristles have "flags," split-ends if you will, and acrylic can ruin those, too, I'm told. A good choice for acrylic painting is synthetic fiber brushes--easier to clean, less expensive, don't gum up, etc. For oils, you can use either one...depends on your preference...but I prefer natural bristle with oil paint.

Regards

Flash
03-04-2002, 10:59 AM
Thanks Gary!


Does anyone have an opinion on this one? I will be starting my first oil painting soon and wondered if I can start with using Linseed oil to thin my paint when needed and then clean my brushes with turpenoid in my bathroom with the window open so that the only time I have to worry about odor is while I'm cleaning. I really don't want to thin my paint with another solvent because of the hazards. Opinions please!!

Wayne Gaudon
03-04-2002, 01:16 PM
if you use "Turpenoid Natural" (different from Turpenoid), there is no odor .. smells quite pleasant. As far as thinning paint. oil will work .. I think Stand Oil is the preferred for thinning as it works better but takes a little longer to dry. I'm only quoting what I have read for thinning paint as I don't thin my paint, I use it from the tube as I paint with a knife and not a brush. I do use Turpenoid Natural to clean my palett. No smelly odors and I keep it under cover at all times except when using which would limit it to a minuite or 2 of exposure. According to the label it is quite safe and made from natural resourses so there are no harsh chemicals involved.

vallarta
03-04-2002, 03:39 PM
DON'T THIN ANYTHING WITH STAND OIL......IT IS A THICK SURPY LIQUID ABOUT AS VISCUS AS HONEY.

IF YOU WANT TO THIN YOUR PAINT.....(SAY FOR A SKETCH OR A FIRST CRACK AT AN UNDERPAINTING) USE TURP OR PAINT THINNER.

IF YOU WANT TO USE A MEDIUM FOR OVERPAINTING OR DOING OPAQUE COATS I SUGGEST A NEWBEE GET GRUMBACHER 2 OR 3 ...DEPENDING IF YOU WANT FAST OR SLOW DRYING.

THEN IF YOU FIND YOU LIKE DOING OIL PAINTING YOU CAN START LOOKING INTO THE "MIXTURES" AND "EXOTICS" THAT GET DISCUSSED IN ENDLESS DETAIL BY THE "PROFESSIONALS." DON'T GET HOOKED ON THE IDEA THAT YOUR PAINTING WILL SUDDENLY BECOME MUSEUM GRADE JUST BECAUSE YOU HAVE A NEW MEDIUM. SPEND YOUR TIME AND MONEY PAINTING...AND WHEN STARTING DONT WORRY ABOUT THE FRILLS.

VALLARTA