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prettytulips
04-29-2006, 12:09 AM
I've seen some pretty interesting underpaintings on the WIP's here and I'm surprised to see the color choices but don't understand if there is a general rule for applying the underpainting? Is it important to use only complimentary colors as the underpainting? Should I always use darker colors in the underpainting?

Any general rules for this? Thanks!

khourianya
04-29-2006, 12:32 AM
There aren't any really hard and fast rules for underpainting. You can do complementary colours and that really makes the pastel sing when laid over top. I prefer local colours and then really get my darks laid in when i underpaint, so I can build up the lights over top. It's a matter of preference, really. Experiment and see what you like best and what makes the biggest difference in your paintings.

prettytulips
04-29-2006, 12:34 AM
Thanks! What are local colors?

khourianya
04-29-2006, 01:34 AM
The real colours of the subject (or the colour that you plan to use over the underpainting)

Tressa
04-29-2006, 07:33 AM
I do both ways, depending on what I am looking for in the painting, and their are SO many shades of color, that you can use comp color, and get a different look with different bias... and example of local color, if I am doing something red, I might underpaint with a purple bias red, and then overpaint with warm orange bias red.. experiment!!! :)
Tres

ColorOfMagic
05-01-2006, 12:42 PM
Here's a couple of threads I submitted on the same subject..
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=337531
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=338465
Jim
"Rules are made to be broken"

I've seen some pretty interesting underpaintings on the WIP's here and I'm surprised to see the color choices but don't understand if there is a general rule for applying the underpainting? Is it important to use only complimentary colors as the underpainting? Should I always use darker colors in the underpainting?

Any general rules for this? Thanks!

Donna A
05-02-2006, 03:24 PM
I've seen some pretty interesting underpaintings on the WIP's here and I'm surprised to see the color choices but don't understand if there is a general rule for applying the underpainting? Is it important to use only complimentary colors as the underpainting? Should I always use darker colors in the underpainting?

Any general rules for this? Thanks!

Hi! I agree with Cori and Tres that there are many things you can do----and NO general rules!

Experimenting is an important thing to do to acquint yourself with various possibilities and effects!!! Find ways that serve YOU rather than wrapping yourself in someone else's style----other than to play with it a bit as another possibility and find within it what works for you!

Do several small experiements----perhaps with the same subject----with differing underpaintings or colors of paper. My ultra-favorite ground is the Art Spectrum Colourfix paper which comes now in 17 colors and they are adding a few others before toooo long. Great range----and the papers take watercolor, acrylic, oil----(for final paintings in those mediums) as well as washes in those mediums under the pastel paintings. My favorite underpainting method is rubbing a moderate amount of pastel onto the paper surface then using a large bristle brush and drug-store rubbing alcohol to brush over the pastel, wetting it and moving it around---usually pretty briskly----with a paper towel in one hand!!!! I use the towel to wipe off potential drips and runs-----as well as cleaning off the brush----AND wiping in lighter areas to show form, etc.

It's a great way to establish darks, set the composition in place, etc.

Really do experiment a LOT!!! And pay attention to what works for you and what you like and what feels good to you! You! It's about YOU! This is part of how you will develop or enhance your own personal style!

The experience you gain in your experiments will serve you well! Very best wishes! Enjoy! Donna ;-}

NickyW
08-15-2007, 07:07 PM
Hi everyone, i have a few peices of art spectrum colourfix paper which i have decided half an hour into painting, im not enjoying this. So, i just want to know, is turpentine or metho the alcohol you use, or is it something totally different, i am from Australia and was wondering do we Aussies call it one of these (metho or turps)..I would appreciate your help, and love to save the paper..thanks kindly

KJSCL
08-15-2007, 09:05 PM
Nicky

I don't know what it would be referred to in Australia, but rubbing alcohol (isopropyl) is what I use and it is the stuff you by at the drug store. Hope this helps a bit!!

Donna T
08-16-2007, 10:41 AM
Hi Nicky, I've been experimenting with some scraps of Colorfix paper. I decided to recycle a piece and so far this has worked for me: I brush off all the pastel I can with a stiff brush, originally made for stencilling. I wet a kitchen-type sponge with water and kind of sponge off the rest of the pastel. If you don't get the edges or back of the paper wet it seems to lie a lot flatter when it dries. If I have used rubbing alcohol for the underpainting I can't quite get back to the original color but close enough to use the paper again. Just have fun and play with it- at least you will feel good about trying to save the paper!

Donna T

rr113
08-16-2007, 12:31 PM
I can think of two reasons for doing an underpainting;


1. You do an underpainting so that some of it shows through. What I mean by that is that 1. either some of the underpainting is not overpainted, usually little specks of color. or 2. that light penetrates the top layer, hits the underpainting layer and is influenced by it (some absorbed) and is reflected back through the overpainting. (unlikely in most cases.)

This being the case, you are using the underpainting to have two colors side by side influence each other. That is called the phenomenon of "simultaneous contrast". If you Google it, you will get a lot of interesting information from which you can deduce various techniques. In short, the tonal quality, the chroma and intensity quality, and the temperature quality of a color are all changed by the colors around it. the most common effect is the intensity of a color is made more intense by having its complement around it. It "pops" out the color.

2. You do an underpainting because you paint from the back to the front of your subject matter. In the course of transforming a three dimension scene into a two dimensional picture, you can think of layers on the two dimensions that correspond to the third dimension on real life. For example, a tree is a globular form but on the support, you might first build up a dark form for the tree (somewhat circular). This is the underpainting. Then you layer over it the lights, and finally the hilites and/or the back lights. You do not try to paint the tree in one layer by, in one area, painting in the dark shadows and then next to it the light part. You paint over the dark not around it otherwise you will get a primitive or folk art effect.

Best
Richard