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guillot
02-28-2002, 01:17 PM
Hi everyone, I have a question about a suggestion Aurorapope put on one of my threads. I've never used sand in my paint (I'm still learning, of course). Although I have seen this done in other works, I have no idea what the proper technique involves.

Can you guys please shed me some light on this subject?

As always, Thank you for your help and mentoring :angel:


Tina

arourapope
02-28-2002, 03:19 PM
I've only tried it once before, so I don't really know if I did it "right." But I just added it to my paint until I got a texture I liked. Seemed to be kind of hard on my brushes, though. I really liked to effect so I will probably do it again. Hope that helps!
Aurora

lori
02-28-2002, 05:16 PM
hi...

i work with sand and textures alot. i have always put them in the gesso layers and not in my paint.

i've never done that because i have heard that the sand and oil combo breaks down after awhile. this is because oil paint hardens when it dries and isn't maluable unlike acrylic based paint. which when you have a painting over years, there is going to be some give and take on the canvas. and that movement is needed, so the extra weight of the sand in the oil will wear the oil paint chemically down.

anyway, that is what i've heard, but never have tried it myself...it may just work fine as aurora has stated, if that is the case, just mix the sand into the pigment...no mediums though...straight paint.

anywho...sand in the gesso or acrylic medium after the gesso works really well for oil paint. in fact, you can buy mixtures already made, if you don't want to do it yourself. this of course requires the need for planning, if you only want it in certain areas, so i would recommend sketching where it should go, then applying it afterward.

for myself, i usually put it all over the canvas and build my painting on top of it, sometimes even using the movement of the sand to dictate my design, but that is how i work generally.

arourapope
02-28-2002, 05:35 PM
Thanks for clearing that up! I was kind of shooting in the dark, so listen to Lori and not me, please.
Lori, do you think that would apply so much if the painting is on panel (need for maluability and such), or is it more of a chemical breakdown that occurs between the oils and the sand? I've used shards of glass in the past too; that's why I ask....... I know not to use organic materials, for obvious reasons, but I never knew about sand, glass (bits of copper?)
Good question, Tina. Thanks for asking it!
Aurora

lori
02-28-2002, 06:42 PM
hey aurora...

this is so funny because kelly emailed me yesterday about varnishing paintings with sand in them. we must all be cosmically in alignment! maybe we start a new genre/school of painting...the sandpipers...lol JOKING!

anyway, from what i understand with the sand and oil mixture is that, because oil paint dries to a rigid chemical structure and sand creates pockets of air around it, the sand will actually move inside of the dried paint...obviously this happens on a microscopic level, but eventually...uh, anyones guess, this wears on the oil paint, especially on a canvas, that is inherently maulable. on a panel i imagine the deterioration still takes place but at a slower pace.

glass and copper experience the same thing. its the same principle as above, the oil paint doesn't bond with these surfaces, creating a space where "air" gets in (for lack of a better term).

all you have to do is think of everyone's favorite painter, that we love to hate...julian schnabel...remember his dish paintings? they started to fall off the canvas...of course he used a bonding agent also (i think bondo, but not sure) on some of the dish pieces, but not all of them. anyway, after years, i think only 10, the paint was so hard and rigid, that they came loose...his prices fell too!i'm sure it all depends on how much surface is still exposed and how big the pieces are too.

anyway, the best possible situation is that the paint has completely encased the sand or other object because at least the exposure to air isn't as great...

anyway, like i said, acrylic based paints and mediums move, so they act as a seal around the sand. think of it as dipping the sand in plastic, it holds it in place.

i have paintings with sand (and dirt...yeah i know, not supposted to use organic, but what the hell...lol) that go back about 15 or so years that i did this way and they are exactly in the same condition as they were when i painted them...so i take that as a good sign.

bri
02-28-2002, 07:22 PM
.....I have been painting on cement these last few days. It has a sandy surface. It's paint on cement on wire mesh wrapped around plywood. I wanted some different texture and boy, did I get it. You can easily get intentional cracks with this stuff, too. It's pretty fun and the edges are very irregular. They're going to look like contemporary artifacts when I fram them real crisp and clean!...

Ok.....dig in and rip me apart..........I know these may be conservator's nightmare.....



~bri :crying:

lori
02-28-2002, 08:12 PM
hey bri,

that sounds great...i'd love to see them! post 'em when you're done, okay???

uh, i'm the first to break rules, and often do...in this instance, i've done it by the book because its the way that i orginally did it, later found out it was correct, nothing more.

if you want, i'll give you a list of all the things i do, that many claim i shouldn't...including smoking! lol...

see you on the flip side...lorita

arourapope
02-28-2002, 08:46 PM
Fascinating!!!!! Bri, I'm very intrigued.....very.....
The painting I used the sand in was very experimental. I used polyeurathane also (very cool effect, but really tough to work with - I'm not going to try that again!). In any case, it was lots of layers deep, with the sand at the bottom. Maybe it'll be okay. LOL! I don't even know if the polyeurathane will be okay. Looks pretty cool, though, and it's not for sale.
I did something else with that painting that I thought worked pretty well. I added sandpaper in between gesso layers. And that was kind of neat. I *think* that'll do okay since its under gesso, but I'm not sure.
In any case, Lori, don't you tear up your brushes? Is there a trick to this I'm missing to keep them safe?
I am kind of concerned about my copper bits painting now. It's about three years old and it's holding up really well, but it would make me very sad to see it fall apart. I'm glad this came up though, because I just came across my little box of copper bits and I was contemplating............. Oh well.
:)
The "sandpipers" huh? That sounds interesting.
Aurora

guillot
02-28-2002, 09:49 PM
You guys are so great! Thanks Aurora, Lori and Bri. You've opened my eyes into an area I've been contemplating for some time. I see a lot of textured works in oil here in El Paso. Some I like, and others..........hmmmm..........well, you know. I've also seen some pieces with copper in them Aurora that look beautiful.

One of my friends has this painting of a pre-historic cave art (bull) that was painted with a very heavy sandy texture. (I think I told you about this one Aurora in a different thread) Anyway, I touched the surface, and of course, a few pieces scrambled off the canvas........:eek: All I could do of course was apoligize to my friend (who said it was ok to touch). She said that it does that every know and then, so I suppose............it's going to fall off the canvas one day. But like I said, it has a real, real heavy sand texture to it, and I'm not sure exactly what the artist used to get that affect. (and it has a lot of bright colors in it, and it does look like a pinata :D ) So, I know I don't want to do my drawing/painting that "vividly". I don't want it to fall off the canvas either of course. But I would like to achieve a texture that resembles an old wall though.

What about plaster???? Have you guys used plaster, to get the same gritty affect??

The use of sandpaper inbetween layers is interesting too.

OH, BTW Lori.........I smoke too.......know how ya feel;) It's a terrible............terrible habit :(

The sandpipers.......That's cute.

Thanks again!!

Tina

bri
02-28-2002, 10:51 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Feb-2002/iheardthat.JPG


it is oil on cement on wire mesh wrapped around and screwed to plywood. even in its construction i felt i was going too far but in a frame it'll have the desired effect. i simply wanted something so rough that i'd have to break habit to either compete or harmonize with....did i do either? i don't know...i just painted. this also has some smoother textures applied with a lead/yolk/whiting mix.

~bri



***okay, lori...i put it on the line, now you go down that list you spoke of...

:evil:

Lori,

I smoked for a few years. My lover started taking puffs here and there and more frequently, and that broke my heart that I was doing that. I quit cold turkey and never looked back. It is one of few times I’ve been disciplined and conquered a major hurdle in my life……..(besides buying big brushes). I doubt that I ever could have done it without my feelings for her.

I worked night shift at a gas station…..yeah, I know….but I got so much art done there, it was great! Problem was, as a 20-year-old non-smoker but package design addict, I was fascinated by the many seemingly cryptic designs and metallic printing on these hundreds of cigarette packs which loomed above my head every night. At some point in 1990 curiosity got the best of me, and all alone, at two in the morning, with moths fluttering everywhere around the outdoor spotlights, I buckled.


:(

bri
02-28-2002, 11:04 PM
.............of the upper right corner. that previous jpg was a bit blurry and only showed general texture, not grittyness.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Feb-2002/iheardthatedgedetail.JPG

~b

***by the way, the painting is about 7" x 7"

The other pieces which Bri is painting on the cement slabs are abstract, and as his legal representation I have advised my client to post or comment no more on these pieces...for the sake of my client's already crumbling reputation----legal dept.



________________________________

"The tears that you spill, the sorrowful, are sweeter than the laughter of snobs and the guffaws of scoffers."
-Khalil Gibran

guillot
03-01-2002, 09:47 AM
Wow Bri, that's fascinating. I love the texture! :clap:

vallarta
03-01-2002, 05:21 PM
Sand works best with acrylics not oils.

With both it plays hell on brushes and so if you can use a knife or use your fingers.

If you use sand you can also use a lot of other things. Diaphomous earth is one, then dirt, egg shells, ground up sea shells, ground up volcanic rock, etc. The grinding of these things can be done in a mortor and pestal or get an old Ousteriszer from a GoodWill store and feed it slowly.

To learn more about these techniques you might try to find a copy of ARTEFFECTS BY JEAN DRYSDALE GREEN. The book describes all kinds of additives etc for all painting materials and how to use them.

vallarta

lori
03-01-2002, 07:20 PM
bri...

oh don't get me started on THE LIST!!! lol...

this work is really lovely, its really beautiful, and hey that texture...WOW! love it. i love how her face is coming out of the cement, i think it works..so you just used regular cement??? interested in your technique.

vallarta,

your book recommendation sounds great, i checked out amazon and found one for $96.95! is it out of print? since it was a paperback, i'm curious...about to do a more indepth search, but geez...

do you have this book and can you comment further on its contents, since i am very interested in painting with all sorts of materials, this book sounds like a good find.

thanks...lori

guillot
03-01-2002, 08:43 PM
Hi Lori,

Found it at http://amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0823025292
$20.96 or used for $16.77

Sounds like an interesting book. Funny though, I saw something with the same title, same author, anywhere from 80.92 - 124.93 :confused: :confused:

Thanks Vallarta for shedding some light on this subject. I believe I'll get the book too!

Tina

impressionist2
03-01-2002, 09:02 PM
Lori wrote: "all you have to do is think of everyone's favorite painter, that we love to
hate...julian schnabel...remember his dish paintings? they started to fall off the
canvas...of course he used a bonding agent also (i think bondo, but not sure)
on some of the dish pieces, but not all of them. anyway, after years, i think
only 10, the paint was so hard and rigid, that they came loose...his prices fell
too!i'm sure it all depends on how much surface is still exposed and how big
the pieces are too. "



Lori, I saw one of Schnabel's dish paintings at the Heckscher Museum here on Long Island. It was an enormous painting and when I walked into the room it was being shown in, I just fell in love with it!!

It was so captivating in person and I stared at it, mesmerized, for a long time. The colors were beautiful.

I don't hate him. Just my 2 cents worth.

Bri, I love your painting. The face is wonderful.

Great thread, and as for me I think sand works best with those great textured acrylic paintings.

Renee

lori
03-01-2002, 09:13 PM
Originally posted by guillot
Hi Lori,

Found it at http://amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0823025292
$20.96 or used for $16.77

Tina

thanks tina...yeah i was shocked when i saw the price! it sounds like a good book to have in my studio library. i'm definitely going to purchase it too, thanks for the link.

hey renee...

i was being facetious...i actually like his work too. its just that alot of people were really down on him in the 80's because he was making so much money, he was kind of the man everyone loved to hate, thats what i was refering to. personally i like his work, and his directorial work too. i recommend seeing before night falls, his most recent movie...it is visually stunning, besides being a very interesting story.

bri
03-02-2002, 09:47 AM
Thanks. The cement mix was something like:

10 parts washed sand, 3 parts Portland Cement, and 1 or 2 parts lime.

I didn't have a reason for this. I was just going by a previously aquired masonry mix. In fact, it was doing the masonry that got me all excited about texture in the first place. The stuff you can do with a few trowels is endless! I am going to use my dry pigment/water pastes to do a small fresco type piece on a similar support.





The first time I ever used sand we were adding it to acrylics and I didn't want to at all, so I was adding a grain or two to piss off the instructor. He told me to really add a lot of sand or I'd receive a grade appropriate for my actions. I HEAPED the sand into my paint until it wouldn't take any more and applied it with a pallette knife...it was so thick, I wasn't even thinking about painting. I was only trying to lay the stuff on as thick as possible.......

............It ended up being a really cool piece and he held it up as an example to the class of what we should be doing :-( So much for spite.

Below is the back of one of those cement/wire mesh/plywood units. I used screws on the front as well, every three square inches. Keep in mind I also don't care if they crack, in fact, I am interested in seeing how they crack.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Mar-2002/backofcementsupport.JPG




~bri

lori
03-02-2002, 02:41 PM
thanks bri...

that photo says it all. heading out to the hardware store today, i'm going to look into a bag o' cement, you've really gotten me fired up about this...thanks!

also, looking forward to having my hands scraped up from this...lol. i once did a painting that i wove together the panels with re-barb...my hands were sore for two weeks, of course i had "sown" the panels together in a design, it was exhausting...and painful...now everytime i see wire, i "feel" it in my hands...lol.

vallarta
03-02-2002, 03:25 PM
The paper version is about $20 in Borders and other book stores. I think you must have found some out of print book with the same title. Or else a 'LEATHER BOUND" version...heheheh

The book discribes all type of special effects for each medium. It is divided by mediums....oil paint, acrylics, watercolor, pastel etc. You see examples and the method employed. Yes I have it in my library.

You can also "transpose" some of the effects in one medium to another....ie. watercolor effects can be done in acrylics, etc. If your working in ABSTRACTS I would think it a MUST HAVE BOOK.

Another effect that may be of interest to use with/without sand would be modeling paste. Attached to a screen (metal or nylon) attached to a board you can model the scene to be painted. Example, you could make a 3D canyon painting. A 3D Jungle painting....perhaps with a vine covered tree before the dense jungle follage.

vallarta

vallarta
03-02-2002, 03:31 PM
I mentioned egg shells before but didn't speak of how to use them. Put egg shells...(washed clean) into a mixer and then take the resulting grit and use it in various surfaces especially when painting sand. It is a wonderfull additive when doing a beach scene.

Make different mixes of the egg shells ....fine, medium, course and then sprinkle them into the paint as appropriate. You can also mix the egg shells with dark sand and get a very realistic look to sand.

Most of the "addatives" look best with larger pictures. I would not think about using them with small paintings. I believe in most cases the "grit" would stick out like a sore thumb.

vallarta

lori
03-02-2002, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by vallarta
The paper version is about $20 in Borders and other book stores. I think you must have found some out of print book with the same title. Or else a 'LEATHER BOUND" version...heheheh

The book discribes all type of special effects for each medium. It is divided by mediums....oil paint, acrylics, watercolor, pastel etc. You see examples and the method employed. Yes I have it in my library.

You can also "transpose" some of the effects in one medium to another....ie. watercolor effects can be done in acrylics, etc. If your working in ABSTRACTS I would think it a MUST HAVE BOOK.

Another effect that may be of interest to use with/without sand would be modeling paste. Attached to a screen (metal or nylon) attached to a board you can model the scene to be painted. Example, you could make a 3D canyon painting. A 3D Jungle painting....perhaps with a vine covered tree before the dense jungle follage.

vallarta

thanks vallarta...yeah, maybe leather bound with gold leaf???lol.

i'm just going to do what you recommend and head over to boarders, since i keep finding a huge gap in the price of the book, i now feel like i want to hold the book in my hand before i purchase it, just to make sure i have the right book.

also, i have used modeling paste, love the stuff...when i lived in germany, i also found products that had silica (sp?) in them that had great textures and were ready mixed...loved that too.

i also think your recommendations for egg shells sound interesting....

i am really fired up by all the possibilitities, that we have discussed here! can't wait to get started!

arourapope
03-02-2002, 06:30 PM
This thread just gets better and better! Bri, I love that piece. I'm interested in where the cracks go too.....I bet it'll start looking like an ancient fresco.
Now what would the eggshells do as far as breaking down over time? Would just keeping them in the gesso prevent that from happening? I know eggshells are used in decorative painting technigues, and I've always wondered what happened with that too.....( and I just threw away the eggshells of 12 eggs.....darn!)
Aurora
ps. I wonder, Lori.....I've been thinking about this sand thing (can you tell?!?!) I wonder what would happen to sand thrown onto the surface of the final layer of paint while it's still tacky.....but not painted over...... What do you think?

lori
03-02-2002, 06:52 PM
Originally posted by aurorapope
I wonder, Lori.....I've been thinking about this sand thing (can you tell?!?!) I wonder what would happen to sand thrown onto the surface of the final layer of paint while it's still tacky.....but not painted over...... What do you think?

hey aurora, as if i needed more proof that we are on the same wavelength! i did a painting like this years ago, in fact you can see it on my website, its called on my wedding day #7 image. this is a good example on what NOT to do!!! lol...hey bri, you can add this to my list...

anyway, i did exactly the method that you describe, only i used alabaster dust (i save it from when i sculpt, to use in my paintings), the effect/affect was amazing...in fact it glistens, and is translucient enough that you can see the nude figure underneath when standing in front of it...(unfortunately you can't see that in the digital photo...)


anyway, i can't varnish this painting (the dust will soak up the varnish and it won't have the same effect), in fact i couldn't do anything to it, including TOUCH the area with the alabaster dust! (finger prints) i sold this painting to my old roomate because i couldn't move it out of the house without damaging it. my old roomate finally moved from this house we shared about a year ago...i asked him how it withstood the move and he said great, but i still don't have the heart to go and see the painting...i love that painting for personal reasons and it was really hard to sell...so i really don't want to see what condition it is in, i'd rather just remember it the way it was...as i know, there is NO WAY he could of moved it without problems...

so, hum...this might be a little different then putting sand ontop of the paint, but i believe it would probably have the same effect...it'll rub off eventually, although not as fragile as the alabaster dust, i'm sure it would have its own set of problems...lol.

give it a try though, and let me know what happens with yours...

Katherine J
03-02-2002, 08:10 PM
Hi everyone

Hope you haven't abandoned this sand topic because I have a question. I prepared an art board for pastel with coarse pumice gel and acrylic ground for pastels, then underpainted with acrylic. It's got too much grit for me for pastels, but perhaps it would work with oils. What do you think? Appreciate any replies.

PS Love the painting on cement.

Katherine

paintfool
03-02-2002, 08:55 PM
I'm really enjoying this thread! Textures and the possibilities have always fascinated me! I've worked with sand a little and have always put it in the gesso. I don't know why, it just seemed like the thing to do. :D
Katherine, i don't know what the ingredients of the pumice gel are so i don't know how it will interact with the oil paint. If you've coated it with acrylic my guess would be that it should be fine to then use as a ground for oil paint. I guess i'd try it and see.
I LOVE your cement piece Bri! I just happen to have all of those items on hand!!! I do believe that if i ever complete the portrait i'm on now i'll get back to some serious fun with textures!
I hope to see this tread around for a bit! :)
Cheryl

arourapope
03-03-2002, 10:08 AM
Thanks Lori. That does sound beautiful......
Aurora

guillot
03-03-2002, 11:30 AM
Sorry it's taken me awhile to get back to you guys. I've been stuck in the drawing/sketching weekend project they had going on yesterday. Their theme was silent movie stars!! It was a lot of fun!

You guys are so informative!! Thanks Aurora, Bri, Lori, Cheryl and Vallarta for all of the insight, and different possibilities!!

I'm thinking of trying the sand in the gesso to see how that works. Although the concrete would definitely be nice too! (Really interesting!!) AND now I know not to throw out my eggshells :D I probably won't get to this particular painting for another week (and I'm still working on buying that digital camera). My scanner just isn't big enough for anything bigger than an 8x10, or 9x12 piece of paper :(

Great Information!!!!!! :clap: :clap:

Tina

timelady
03-03-2002, 01:07 PM
Coming into this a bit late but I tried texture a while ago. I was advised to use marble dust instead of sand because sand is porous and marble dust isn't (you can get it at good art stores - Fitzgerald's in London is my source). Also, I was told to be very careful using it on stretched canvases because of the weight, which could cause the canvas to sag over time. Better to use on board or canvas attached to a rigid support, etc. I also put mine in the acrylic gesso layer rather than in the oil.

Tina.

Katherine J
03-04-2002, 02:27 PM
Hi Paintfool

I looked at my jar of pumice gel and it says it's "formulated with 100% acrylic polymer emulsion". It says nothing else about any other ingredients, so I'm presuming this would be compatible with oils, don't you think? Anyway, it's worth a try on something I'm not going to get bent out of shape about if it doesn't work.

Katherine

vallarta
03-04-2002, 03:28 PM
Some other materials that can be used...among many discussed in the book ART EFFECTS BY JEAN DRYSDALE GREEN...(WATSON-GUPTILL PUBLICATIONS) ARE PLANT MATERIAL, D(SOMETHING) EARTH (SOLD IN ART STORES), AND ONE THAT LOOKS SUPER....CARBON. YES...PLANE OLD CHARCOAL....CUT UP IN THE GRINDER/MIXER. IT LEAVES A METALLIC SHEEN ON THE WORK.

I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK IF YOU WANT TO DO SPECIAL EFFECTS. NOT EVERYTHING HAS TO BE ADDITIVE....THERE ARE SECTIONS ON USING INK, PAPERS, ALUMINUM FOIL, PLASTIC BAGS, ETC ETC ETC.

THE PRICE I PAID WAS $30 AT BORDERS FOR THIS.

VALLARTA

guillot
03-04-2002, 04:04 PM
Charcoal?????????? Now that's interesting!!

I'm definitely going to have to get this book Vallarta!! Thank you so much for the information! You've helped me tremendously!!

:D :D ;)

Tina

arourapope
03-06-2002, 03:41 PM
Hey!
I just finished a sandy piece! I mixed the sand in with the gesso. It's a 13 x 20 inch panel.
Thought you might be interested.
Aurora

guillot
03-09-2002, 10:39 AM
Hey Aurora - can you give us a bit of history on this piece??? Just interested to know.

I like the figure in the background. It's interesting!! I can see how the sand created a texture here, and I like it.

Hopefully I'll be able to get my Dig.Camera out of "Layaway" (I don't understand :confused: I work, and work, and work, and I make lots of money but stay broke :confused: :confused: ) The dilemma of life, huh? Anyhoo, mabe I'll get to post some work here soon!! Have an art class today in portraiture...looking forward to that.

I know I've been holding off on my "bull relief". But I want to be able to post progress pics as I go, hence the camera :(

God knows......living in El Paso.........I've got plenty of sand :D :D

Tina

kelly
03-09-2002, 11:53 AM
As Lori mentioned earlier, I contacted her about varnishing paintings I have done with sand or rocks or other unidentifiable objects ;)

Ive accumulated ALOT of paintings in the last 5 years...I paint but have had no reason to varnish until recently when Ive started selling them. The problem is I dont know anything about varnishing and need alot of help understanding this process.

Like, how much turpentine with the damar...etc Lori recommends 2-3 coats....how about you?

Anyway, most of my site looks like an archaelogical dig...very rough and jagged.

arourapope
03-10-2002, 11:10 AM
Sorry it's taken me so long to get back to this thread. It's been a pretty busy couple of days around here. I haven't had much time to do wc right, and every time I get on this site I wind up doing the egg thing! :o
Anyway, Guillot, you wanted to know about this artifact. It's called the Cultic Stela and it's dated from about 3000 BC. It's a recent discovery from Tell Hariri (ancient Mari), where it was found in a trench beneath an alter of a temple dedicated to the earth goddess Ninhursag.
I saw the artifact at an exhibit called "Ancient Empires" at Fernbank Museum in Atlanta. It's a traveling exhibit on Syria that has on display artifacts dating as far back to hand axes and such made by Homo erectus to near present stuff. Very impressive! It's in Atlanta till September, but I'm sure it's headed your way at some point. Definately go check it out if you get a chance.
The Cultic Stela is an a carved alabaster stone. It's quite beautiful. The figure behind it is based on sculpture (don't know the name of the sculpture right off, sorry) that was also at the exhibit, of what is presumably a priestess or a goddess figure. I tried to make her "human" and stayed loyal to the jewelry and hairstyle, etc. I painted her first with a dark background, all with turp thinned paint, then I glazed the Cultic Stela directly over her, highlighting and darkening where I thought I needed to make both layers evident yet fading into each other.
The figure behind the artifact is a bit easier to see in real life than it is online. :(
I posted a link to an article on the exhibit in the Art HIstory forum, but I don't think there are any other ancient art history nuts at wc. Nobody's responded at all. :crying: So here's the link for you:
http://www.artnet.com/magazine/features/karlins/karlins9-26-01.asp
There's a picture of the Cultic Stela there too.
Anyway, I hope you get your digicam! I'm looking forward to seeing what you come up with! I'm about to start a series of masks. I'm not sure if, where, and when I'm going to use sand in these, but I'm definately going to "play" some with them. :)

Kelly, I went to your site. Cooooool stuff! I really love _Roots_. That's the right title, isn't it? I have no idea how to deal with the varnishing, as I haven't gotten to that point yet. LOL! Hopefully I'll be wiser in the six months to a year time that I have to wait before varnishing, and by then I'll have an answer!
If you find the solution, please share, okay? :)
Well, I gotta go finish spring cleaning. Aaaaaaaaargh! Think of me in my anguish, okay?
Aurora

guillot
03-10-2002, 12:40 PM
oooooooooo, like the helmet with the mask Aurora! (on the artnet website) Is this one of the masks your going to do??? Really cool link and Really cool history!! :D :D

Like your website too kelly!! ;)

That's interesting stuff aurora!! BTW, I stopped looking for those eggs (I know what you mean) Maybe they will give a prize for the person with the least eggs?

I don't know why people aren't interested in ancient art. It's the beginning of it all :)

Ok, If I can find the time between my portraiture classes, I'm going to try to start next weekend on my bull.

What is the ratio of sand to gesso????? Or is there a ratio? No rules apply????? :evil: :D

Hey, let me know if you need some sand, LOL, I've got a whole desert here for ya :D :D

Tina

arourapope
03-10-2002, 06:37 PM
Heheheh....I've got some georgia red clay for you!
I'm not sure which or how many masks I'm going to do yet. I"m sort of going with the flow on this on. I'll letcha know once I'm in the thick of it.
I don't know if there is a ratio of sand to gesso. Never thought of it really. I just sprinkled ("tossed" might be the better word) some on as it was drying. Then I painted another layer of gesso over it. I kind of let the sand decide where it wanted to go.
Good luck!
Aurora