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aszurblue
04-23-2006, 07:09 AM
I have read here, that Oil pastels never dry! Is that so? and why? What is in them that would not let them dry like just oil paints? What about the ones that are water soluble?

Also what is the difference between oil sticks and oil pastels? And last, why are they called pastels? They do not look or handle at all like the other pastels.
I know these are some silly questions, but I am soooo new to OP's. Azure :heart:

Pat Isaac
04-23-2006, 10:05 AM
Welcome,:wave: . It is true that oil pastels never dry, they just harden over time and therfore never crack like oils. I'm not sure why and think it may have something to do with the binder. I've never used water soluble ones so don't know about them, but others in this forum have so maybe they can answer.
Oil sticks are real oil paint in stick form that behave like oils, but they do dry faster which is a plus. Oil stidks and oil pastels can be used in the same painting if the OPs are used last.
As far as the name goes, I can't really answer that.
You might check out the pastel library for more info http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=201561 and the oil pastel site.www.oilpastelsociety.com

Pat

sundiver
04-23-2006, 11:16 AM
Maybe they are called pastels because Sennellier, a maker of soft pastels, invented them, in consultation with Picasso, as a more convenient (for Picasso) type of pastel. The main difference is the binder.

aszurblue
04-23-2006, 05:17 PM
Thank You!!! I just picked up a set of 36 Faber-Castells studio quality oil pastels. Is studio quality the same as artist quality? Azure

Bringer
04-23-2006, 07:09 PM
Hi,

here's the reason why they're called pastels (I'm not referring to the oil ones but to pastels in general).
Scroll down to see my answer on the following thread :
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=337278&highlight=Jean+perreal

best regards,

Josť

E-J
04-25-2006, 03:11 AM
Pastels are called pastels, whether soft or oil, because the pigment is ground and mixed with binder to form a paste before it's formed into sticks.

Pat Isaac
04-25-2006, 06:59 AM
Thanks for that explanation, E-J. I had never heard anyone explain that before. Now I know what to tell people when they ask and they do.

Pat

nancyw
04-25-2006, 08:54 AM
My husband purchased water soluable oil pastels, a surprise gift, for me. I had never tried them, but they work wet or dry. I am excited to try something other than WC. Will be back to this forum for good help.

Pat Isaac
04-25-2006, 09:09 AM
Welcome, Nancy.:wave: Looking forward to your posts.

Pat

stonewhiteclown
04-25-2006, 04:35 PM
Hello Azure! Be advised, F-C oil pastels are the far cry of real artist quality ones. There are too hard and waxy to boot.

aberration
04-25-2006, 04:52 PM
Thank You!!! I just picked up a set of 36 Faber-Castells studio quality oil pastels. Is studio quality the same as artist quality? Azure

They're kind of crayon-like compared to the artist-quality. I love Faber-Castell's soft pastels, but their oil pastels are seriously lacking.

The real professional-level brands of OPs are Caran D'ache, Sennelier, Holbein, and Cray-Pas Specialist. Van Goghs aren't bad either -- they're a nice compromise if you don't want to invest a whole lot of money.

aszurblue
04-26-2006, 06:26 AM
Hi Alex, I know this is going to sound bizarre, but its the wax I am after! Its the cheaper way to do encaustics. While playing, I found if I mix in a little poppy oil, It changes the handling of them. Right now this is just for fun!!

aberration,when you say "seriously lacking" what are you referring to?? Thanks, Azure

scoy
04-26-2006, 09:39 AM
Well, the high wax content of OP is part of the reason why they never fully dry. ..just get "stiff" after a while. The other reason is that they are made with non-drying oils (mineral oil, I think, is customary) unlike other oil-based media which use walnut or linseed typically. I, too, play with regular oils and mediums in combination with the pastels to interesting effect.

I've heard several times that poppy oil doesn't dry fully or consistently either, which could be either a boon or a curse in this case, I guess. How do you find it?

aszurblue
04-27-2006, 06:11 AM
Hi scoy, I can not use linseed oil. Have severe allergies to it. I also use safflower oil. I also found they do not yellow like linseed. I haven't tried the walnut oil yet.

aberration
04-27-2006, 10:48 AM
aberration,when you say "seriously lacking" what are you referring to?? Thanks, Azure

Hard, waxy, difficult to blend. Although, from your description, they might be exactly what you need!

laika
04-27-2006, 10:55 PM
Van Goghs aren't bad either -- they're a nice compromise if you don't want to invest a whole lot of money.
how do the Van Goghs compare to the Cry-pas Expressionists? those two seem to be what's available to me locally. the next step up is Sennelier, and they're pretty darned expensive for a beginner.

Pat Isaac
04-28-2006, 07:24 AM
If you can get Cray-pas expressionist, you must be able to get Cray-pas Specialists. These are a step above the Expressionists and still easy on your purse...
Also Dakota pastels www.dakotapastels.com puts out sampler packs of oil pastels including the top 4 brands.

Pat

laika
04-28-2006, 09:38 AM
thank, Pat!

yeah, one local art supply store has the Van Goghs and the Expressionists, but not the Specialists. they have open stock on the Expressionist line. their competitor has Sennelier open stock, but those are $3-somethingUSD apiece - a bit pricey for my scribblings at this point:) i did buy a white and a nice Permanent Intense Red in the Sennelier, so i now understand why folks love those.

that sampler sounds like a good idea.

aberration
04-28-2006, 11:49 AM
how do the Van Goghs compare to the Cry-pas Expressionists? those two seem to be what's available to me locally. the next step up is Sennelier, and they're pretty darned expensive for a beginner.


I prefer Van Goghs -- they're a little softer and I think they have a bit more pigment. The colors seem slightly more intense. They're actually very similar to Specialists -- I just like Specialists more because they're square and have more colors.