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Rosemarie
02-22-2002, 01:11 PM
I recently found this forum. After I've been trying, at our museum together with kids, to make monotypes, I thought I would find a tutorial here. I guess I am spoiled from the Watercolour forum.

Well, is there anyone who can make a good tutorial?

I have tried acrylic on bathroom tiles. One has to work fast before it dries. Any tips???

Gisela
02-22-2002, 05:23 PM
Hi Rosemarie,
This is a relatively new forum, so we don't have a lot of intructional stuff here yet. :)

If you are using acrylic paint, you can give it a fine misting with water while you paint, or use a retardent to keep it 'open' longer. If the paint dries, you can spritz the paper with isoprpyl alcohol before taking the print. If you're using sized paper, are you soaking your paper in water while you paint?
I've also used oil-based printing inks, oil paints, watercolors, pastels, oil pastels, gouache, and monotype inks.

I could probably do a demo/lesson type thing, but I won't have the time until the end of March. Post any questions here in the meantime, though. Someone will be sure to answer.

Also, the book Monotype: Mediums and Methods for Painterly Printmaking, by Julia Ayres is excellent!

Gisela

sassybird
02-22-2002, 05:42 PM
Rosemarie, if you give me until the middle of next week I will write up a tutorial. I'm pretty tied up for the weekend, and am getting a new puter on Mon. I have a lot of info on monotypes, and I have done a lot of them over the past few years.

Rosemarie
02-23-2002, 07:23 AM
Thank you for your replies! I am looking forward to the tutorialS!

Giselasiad: If you are using acrylic paint, you can give it a fine misting with water while you paint, or use a retardent to keep it 'open' longer. If the paint dries, you can spritz the paper with isoprpyl alcohol before taking the print. Good tip!
If you're using sized paper, are you soaking your paper in water while you paint? I've also used oil-based printing inks, oil paints, watercolors, pastels, oil pastels, gouache, and monotype inks.
Rose: I just tried it once and the people showing it used acrylics. I myself have water colours. Do they really work on a superflat and shining surface?

Gisela
02-23-2002, 01:41 PM
Originally posted by Rosemarie
Thank you for your replies! I am looking forward to the tutorialS!...
...I myself have water colours. Do they really work on a superflat and shining surface?

If you'd like to use watercolor, you might want to rough up your surface a bit. I like using plexiglass or mylar and I very lightly sand it with extra fine sandpaper when using watercolor -- just enough to keep the paint from beading up. An added attraction of using a clear surface is that you can place your original drawing under the plate and paint what you see, leaving clear areas to use the white of the paper. I had some fun doing night time winter scenes on black paper, leaving the clear spaces as the dark sky. You might also want to paint using a liitle less water than when painting on paper.

Have fun! :)

Gisela

Tony Perrotta
02-23-2002, 06:08 PM
Hi Rosemarie, I also did monotypes with tile. I use large florring tiles with texture, came out pretty cool. I think if you go back it the threads here in this forum you will find a couple on monotypes,( I think).

Tony

Rosemarie
02-24-2002, 04:26 AM
Here is the next question: What kind of paper do I use? I gather that Arches with all its sizing might not work as well as a more absorbing paper?

Gisela
02-24-2002, 08:32 PM
Rives BFK is pretty popular as is Arches Cover. Watercolor paper could be used too, though you'd probably want to use hot press to get a good transfer. Otherwise the texture of the paper make the transfer a litte spotty. Unless, of course, that's what you want. :) Soak the paper while you're painting, and then put it between blotters to get off the excess water

I'm a bit of a paper freak and I love Oriental papers! Some that I've tried are Goyu, Hosho, Masa, Mulberry, Okarawa and Kitakata. These are all very lightwight papers and it's very easy to see how the transfer is coming along as your rub. Since I use such thin paper, I place a sheet of acetate over the paper to protect it from tearing if I'm hand-rubbing.

Play around and have fun trying different papers. There's no 'right 'paper to use. Different papers will give different results, so experiment and see what you like best.

Places like Daniel Smith and Rembrandt Graphic offer small sample books of printmaking papers. It's a cheap way to check out the feel of a lot of papers. ;)

Gisela

PS -- looking forward to seeing one of your monotypes...hint, hint :D

timelady
02-26-2002, 12:12 PM
I created a monotype/monoprint tutorial when this forum first started, so if you go back a few pages you should find it. :)

Acrylics are difficult to do monoprints with. I would recommend you buy water-based printing inks if you really want to use a water-based medium (and even those dry quickly) but best solution is to use oil inks or oil paints.

As for paper, I spray mine with a mister before taking a print (blotting if there is too much water on any area and it looks shiney). For delicate papers I use a Japanese baren which is a circle of bamboo with a handle - usually fairly cheap.

Tina.

sassybird
02-27-2002, 07:01 PM
Rosemarie, If you look at the top of the list of threads you will see Timelady's monotype lesson as a sticky. Just click and you can copy her lesson onto notepad to save for future reference :)