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Wayne Gaudon
02-19-2002, 05:50 PM
..Ok, I've been using water soluible paint. I can clean my brushes and pallet and anything else just using soap and water and I can do it all in minuites.

After reading about how easy it is to clean up real oils using a bar of ivory soap, I went out and bought 300.00 worth of oils.

Just tested them out .. really different in feel as they are somewhat more buttery and spreadable and I can get adjusted to that.

What is killing me is the clean up. I don't want to use turps or other cleaners and I was under the assumption they would clean up with soap and water. Big mistake .. it took me 4 times the clean up time as I had to spend extra time cleaning the sink, cleaning my hands, dam near wore the bristles off the brushes to get them clean and half a pack of paper towels.

What am I doing wrong or was I just misinformed about the soap and water deal.

Ended up using oil & soap & comet and a lot of time. Hopefully, there is an easier way or do I just have to buckle down and use turps or their counterparts to get a cleanup done in minuites instead of half an hour.

Luis Guerreiro
02-19-2002, 06:30 PM
You've been somewhat misinformed. True oils are TRUE oils. Water soluble oils are something else, possibly invented in Mars :D
You don't need an awful lot of solvent to clean up. Turpentine is a natural product by the way. It comes from trees, trust me. Dip brushes in turps, take them out then wash them well in tepid water with soap. Repeat the wash at least once to remove all the paint. Shouldn't be too difficult.
I have to mention here a product called Ugly Dog (please excuse the publicity, but that's what I use). Ugly Dog soap is a saponified linseed oil soap available from www.studioproducts.com and some other quality art shops. After passing brushes in turps, do the wash using this product. You will be amazed at how fast they get clean and the hair conditioned.
Welcome to real oils. Have fun. Cleaning up real oils is part of the ritual and you will get used to the smell that's been around for hundreds of years. I couldn't live without it. :D :D :D

kevinjh
02-19-2002, 06:34 PM
Artist, I can imagine that soap alone might be a bit of a pain. I use a citrus thinner (their website is http:/www.eco-house.com/citrus_thinner.html) for initial clean up - just to get the globs off the brushes. From there, the "ivory method" works a lot more quickly. The Citrus stuff is way milder than turpentine, but you still should have some decent ventilation.

Wayne Gaudon
02-19-2002, 06:38 PM
.. ok .. it's off to the market tomorrow .. like the buttery feel I think .. need to do a painting before I can see how it works in all areas .. I guess that will happen this weekend .. I hope

thanks.

vallarta
02-19-2002, 06:38 PM
I recommend getting paint thinner...(buy a gallon for about $1.50) at the hardware store. Then use it to wash out your brushes. Then go to the auto store or hardware store and get a jar of GOJO or what kind of mechanics hand cleaner they have.

This is the best stuff to use to give the brushes a second cleaning and also hands, sink etc. It has alo in it and is good so it lubricates the brushes.

Then, depending on how much you paint, once a month give the brushes a dip in Kerosene. If you can't get it where you live don't worry....just give the brushes a second GOJO treatment.

Paint thinner has no smell and works better than turp when you dilute paint to do underpaintings. I never use turp anymore.

vallarta:D

kiwicockatoo
02-19-2002, 07:34 PM
Don't know how big your brushes are artist, but mine are on the small size - I just wipe them out with paper towels, and then clean them in the sink with dish detergent - takes a good 15 - 20 mins but I don't think that's too unreasonable.

Wayne Gaudon
02-19-2002, 08:19 PM
guess I'm spoiled .. working with acrylic and water soluible .. used to clean up in 2 minuites .. oh well, I will adjust .. what a shock .. thank you all ..

paintfool
02-19-2002, 08:27 PM
Every time this subject comes up new and interesting methods of brush cleaning crop up. :) Gojo huh? Well, it is an excellent degreaser so i guess it would work. The people who use Ugly Dog soap seem to like it very much. I haven't tried it. I use turpentine and then wash them with a little bit of saddle soap. The saddle soap seems to keep them in very good condition. I had to laugh when i read Luis' comment about getting used to the smell. I too couldn't live without it! :D I love all of the smells assiciated with oil painting.

Mario
02-19-2002, 09:02 PM
You have NOT been misinformed. I use IVORY soap ONLY and it works just fine, quick and MORE effective than thinner. I am not the only one. A master painter, Scott Noel, lives several blocks from me and I got the idea from him.
www.grossmccleaf.com/artistpages/noelpage.htm
In fact just yesterday I had an especially paint laden brush that I wanted to clean so,(as an experiment) after wiping it with a paper towel and dipping it in thinner, I noticed that I had to first wash out the thinner with soap before I could get all the oil paint out. The thinner had taken out about half of the paint but then there was the thinner to get out, afterwards.
Now, let's try and figure out what is going wrong. My guess is that you are not wiping your brushes clean with paper towels as the beginning of the cleaning process. This will get rid of half of the paint to begin with. I'm guessing that you are using regular size brushes to work on something about 16X20". If you are using the modern dye related colors like the Pthaloes, you have to be a little more carefull cause they can be extremely powerful and therefore more resistent to cleaning. (sable brushes are especially EASY to clean because the hairs are more flexable)
Anyway, I take a bar of IVORY. Push the brush into it and put the brush under running water, do it again, this time I work the soap between and inside the brush bristles. I do this again, all together touching each brush to the soap around FOUR times until no more color appears on the soap. I would guess it takes less than two minutes for each brush...so, 4 brushes = under 8 minutes. Is this too difficult? I think not. I haven't used thinner for several months and I don't miss it at all, honestly!
Oh yes, another master oil painter at the same gallery as above, Paul DuSold uses only soap (any kind) and he also agreed that thinner was no help in the cleaning process. These artists are professional, were trained by the best artists before them like Arthur DeCosta and have each been painting and teaching for well over twenty years. So, don't take my word for it.
I remember having put off starting to paint with oils only because I didn't want the extra cleanup. I began with acrylics but then quickly gave them up in distaste. Now, I am very happy with this rapid cleanup method and it actually provides a nice quiet meditation after the challenge of painting is done.

guillot
02-20-2002, 12:39 AM
Wow Mario!! I guess I'll have to try that! I guess I just worry that I don't get all of the oil out. But I'll give it a try.

I usually get the globs of paint out with paper towels, then I wash them in Turpenoid in my brush wash, wipe them with paper towels again, and then I use a citrus cleaner/conditioner and it works wonderfully. I LOVE MY CITRUS CLEANER/CONDITIONER :D

So, I guess I'll give the 'ol Ivory a shot too. ;)

Tina

jimbob
02-20-2002, 12:45 AM
:cat: try using baby oil
I wipe off the excess paint then
soak my brushes in turpentine for about 10 minutes. After the 10 minutes is up I clian the bristles of my brushes with baby oil

G.L. Hoff
02-20-2002, 12:48 AM
Originally posted by artist
After reading about how easy it is to clean up real oils using a bar of ivory soap, I went out and bought 300.00 worth of oils.

What is killing me is the clean up. I don't want to use turps or other cleaners and I was under the assumption they would clean up with soap and water. What am I doing wrong or was I just misinformed about the soap and water deal.

Well, here's what Rob Howard over on the Cennini Forum says (and btw this is what I've done for about 20 years):

Clean brushes thoroughly, especially at the ferrule, as a deposit of hardened color at this point will cause the head to lose its shape and impair its use.

Excessive use of strong solvents and paint removers should be avoided since these products will ruin artists brushes. Cleaning brushes immediately after use will save money on brushes.

For brushes used in conventional oil color, oil-resin or alkyd colors: Wipe excess color from brush with rags or waste paper. Dispose of paint contaminated rags and waste paper only in an approved covered metal waste can because oil soaked rags and waste left in the open air are subject to spontaneous combustion. Clean the brush thoroughly with Turpentine, or Odorless Paint Thinner. Wipe dry. Rinse brush under running water. Soap up the brush using Brush Soap. Work up a lather in the palm of your hand. Work the lather into the heel of the brush, using your fingers if necessary.

Rinse the brush under running water. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until no color appears in the lather. After each rinsing, inspect the interior of the brush next to the ferrule to ensure the heel of the brush is clean.

Press out water and shape the hairs or bristles into place. Place the brush flat to dry to avoid water collecting in the ferrule.

Brushes that become unmanageable or lose their shape through rough handling should be thoroughly cleaned and then dipped into a 4%, solution of gum arabic. After the brush is wet with the gum arabic solution, form the hair with ones fingers to its original shape. Allow the brush to rest for a week
to ten days before using again. Before using the brush, the dry gum can be powdered off by rubbing the hair between fingers or combed out with an ordinary hair comb.

Again, these tips are from Rob Howard and I'm simply repeating them, but I've used the same procedure for years and years and have the brushes to prove it. Oh, yeah...and I use Ugly Dog soap for washup...works great.
Regards

Wayne Gaudon
02-20-2002, 08:30 AM
.. this site rocks ..

DaveTooner
02-20-2002, 01:05 PM
Here's what I would recommend. I do this myself.

Get an empty coffee can and put a cleaning screen in the bottom (Bob Ross makes these... I've seen others as well) Then fill it up with some kind of cleaner until it is about 1/4 to 3/4 inches above the top of the screen. I use Turpenoid Natural -- smells good, not hazardous.

When you're ready to clean, wipe the brush, then scrub it against the screen. Not so hard that you hurt the bristles though. When it's pretty clean, rinse it in water, then get a lather on it with some brush cleaner (BJ's, Ugly Dog, etc), then rinse the lather off.

Takes a minute or less to clean one brush.

captain bravo
02-21-2002, 08:18 AM
tooner has the right method...i made a brush cleaner with a coffee can and tea strainer. break off the handle of a strainer the size of a coffee can bottom and drop it in, fill with odorless turps and there you are. but here's a shocker from an old sign painter. when i would use my brushes eveyday, i would clean them quickly in the cleaner then spin them between my hands to open up the bristles and then palette them full of motor oil,,,,that's right motor oil...a quick swish in thinner the next day and a drying with the paper towel and you're ready to paint. i've had some of my lettering brushes for 15 years or more and i use the fine ones as liner brushes in my new oil painting attempts...

Wayne Gaudon
02-21-2002, 09:09 AM
.. using paint thinner and the coffee cup can, if I have a lid on the can (ie..plastic top version) and I put the lid on between useds, does the vapor still get out or do I have to empty the can after each use to avoid the lingering vapors?

I live in an apartment so storage is not there and my studio is my apartment so to speak as it is a little apt.

Leopoldo1
02-21-2002, 09:30 AM
Originally posted by artist
.. using paint thinner and the coffee cup can, if I have a lid on the can (ie..plastic top version) and I put the lid on between useds, does the vapor still get out or do I have to empty the can after each use to avoid the lingering vapors?

Turpenoid, as others have said is oderless and is a pleasure to work with. Because it is oderless, do not become to complacent, with skin absorbsion. Coffee cans works good with a screen on the bottom. I put a piece of wood doweling through the top. I think what is important is to recylce your spirits. I have been using a large glass vinegar bottle with the help of a funnel to pour the dirty turpenoid into. I very seldom use new turpenoid because usually within 24 hours the pigment sediments have settled to the bottom where the upper layers are clean again for that days use. I can go a few years like this before the sediment is so full that the bottle can be turned into a hazard waste material site and one can start over again. It is a good idea to be a good steward of the earth!.........L

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Feb-2002/turpcan.jpg

Wayne Gaudon
02-21-2002, 09:50 AM
I agree, it is important for all to do their little piece for the earth as without it, we are dead. I know about the setteling and reuse but [b]what I don't know is if the can with a lid will stop the odorless vapors from escaping the can/bottle or whatever and remaining active within the confined space.{/b] I know there will be some escape while cleaning but I was wondering if when the job is done, I can air out the joint and not worry that while I eat, sleep, and whatever, other fumes are confined!

Leopoldo1
02-21-2002, 10:03 AM
Originally posted by artist
I agree, it is important for all to do their little piece for the earth as without it, we are dead. I know about the setteling and reuse but [b]what I don't know is if the can with a lid will stop the odorless vapors from escaping the can/bottle or whatever and remaining active within the confined space.{/b] I know there will be some escape while cleaning but I was wondering if when the job is done, I can air out the joint and not worry that while I eat, sleep, and whatever, other fumes are confined!

Haven't you heard forum members here post their replies about oderless thinner like turpenoid? Well use it!

DaveTooner
02-21-2002, 10:15 AM
Im pretty sure the vapors will stay in the can w/ the lid on it. I use Turpenoid NATURAL, and I can't smell it when the lid is on, so I would be pretty sure the oderless vapors of regular Turpenoid would stay put.

Wayne Gaudon
02-21-2002, 11:50 AM
Leopoldo . what are you upset about?

Haven't you heard forum members here post their replies about oderless thinner like turpenoid? Well use it!

Yes I have and the question was not concerning smell or odo, it was relating to vapors. IE Can the plastic lid stop the vapors from escaping since with odorless they will be present without my knowledge and travelling around doing their evil deeds without my knowing it.

Relax, life is too short to be walking around in attack mode!


DaveTooner
Thanks for your information based on experience. If it stops the odor of Turps then it stops the vapor as well as they are combined and if it stops turps it will stop odorless.

thank you.

Doug Nykoe
02-21-2002, 01:12 PM
What you should also be concerned with when deciding on a good method to clean your brushes is the delicate brush flag. A screen would take first prize in destroying the flag.

My wife bought me a brush cleaning kit (Silicoil Brush Cleaning Tank) for xmas. Iíve been using an inverted can that I pushed holes into inside another can for twenty years and it has served me well. But I gave this new idea a try and I have to tell you it works great. The coil inside the jar acts like a shock absorber so no matter how hard I try to kill my brushes by pressing to hard the coil will just collapse and prevent me from pressing to hard.

I was going to clumsily try and explain it further but this Dick Blick link will do a better job.
Dick Blick Link (http://www.dickblick.com/zz069/09/products.asp?param=0&ig_id=538)

Wayne Gaudon
02-21-2002, 01:35 PM
Doug Nykoe

Interesting .. most gadgets are really overpriced but 3.79 sure won't break the bank.

DaveTooner
02-21-2002, 03:39 PM
I beg to differ. The screen I use won't destroy the flags. At least not if you do it right. The screen is coated with vinal and each wire in the screen is pretty thick. Besides, its not like you're grinding the brush straight down on the screen. You're just brushing it over the screen, so that the bristles will seperate, allowing the thinner to get in there and clean it good. It's equivilant of scubbing the brush in the palm of your hand w/ soap or something on it.

Doug Nykoe
02-21-2002, 05:52 PM
Originally posted by DaveTooner
You're just brushing it over the screen, so that the bristles will seperate, allowing the thinner to get in there and clean it good. It's equivilant of scubbing the brush in the palm of your hand w/ soap or something on it.

Think about the x portion of the screen even a Teflon screen has grabbing action. Okay Iím going to get weird on you now,,, take a hard block of cheddar cheeses and grate yourself some fine cheddar using said screen. Granted a little weird but it illustrates how the x portion of the screen is grabbing. Now are precious little flags do get caught in here too. Also thereís to many areas on a screen that might get damaged, and accounted for and actually be cutting the hairs before you notice it. Something to think aboutÖ

Luis Guerreiro
02-21-2002, 06:41 PM
Originally posted by paintfool
Every time this subject comes up new and interesting methods of brush cleaning crop up. :) Gojo huh? Well, it is an excellent degreaser so i guess it would work. The people who use Ugly Dog soap seem to like it very much. I haven't tried it. I use turpentine and then wash them with a little bit of saddle soap. The saddle soap seems to keep them in very good condition. I had to laugh when i read Luis' comment about getting used to the smell. I too couldn't live without it! :D I love all of the smells assiciated with oil painting.

Cheryl,
:D It's my turn to laugh out loud... To be perfectly honest, after dipping my brushes in turps or white spirit and wash them at least twice with Ugly Dog Brush Soap, I usually have a sniff :D :D :D (I'm laughing as I write this!!!) because if the brushes are absolutely pristine, they will only stink of Ugly Dog, not turps or oil paint binders. Of course, I don't mind it, not even Ugly Dog stink, but hey!... You know what I'm like! :D
Luis

Wayne Gaudon
02-21-2002, 07:00 PM
Here is the way I finally went .. but I could be talked out of the ladle if someone gives me a good reason why it won't work. I couldn't find the brush cleaner and I can't be bothered ordering it and paying shipping and possibly duty on it. If it comes around at a latter date in my travels I will probably get it as it is a chean accessory.

1 Can of Tupernoid Natural
1 Plastic Container With Seal Proof Lid
1 Half Gallon Pump Style GoJo Cleaner
1 Fairly Flat Metal Lathel (3 inch Diamater)
1 Glass Masonite Jar to store the old sediment

Lots of smooth holes) Will Fit perfectly tight into the container and can be made sit anywhere in the container as it's roughly the same size ..

This thread has been really informative and I thank everyone who took the time to help me make what I think is a good decision based on the facts presented.

Turopo Cause it's natural and not harmful to me or the enviroment
The Jar and Lid cause it makes good sense
Gojo because I like liquid over a bar for ease of dispense
Masonite Jar because I have a load of them

Thanks again to all ..


;)

paintfool
02-21-2002, 09:31 PM
Originally posted by Luis Guerreiro
if the brushes are absolutely pristine, they will only stink of Ugly Dog, not turps or oil paint binders.
Very good thought Luis. :)
The ONE Bob Ross product that i do use and can highly recommend is his brush cleaning system! I had to bring this up after reading comments about screens damaging brushes. The plastic bucket and nylon coated screen (which is very kind to the bristles) is only around $10.00 U.S. I've used the same one for 4 or 5 years.
As for Turpenoid let's be safe in assuming that ALL oil painting supplies should be used with some degree of caution and responsibility. We should always work with the best ventilation possible. We should not be afraid of our materials but with a little common sense and thought we can paint safley.

G.L. Hoff
02-21-2002, 10:59 PM
Originally posted by artist
Turopo Cause it's natural and not harmful to me or the enviroment

I'm confused. I'm assuming you're talking about "Turpenoid Natural?" If so, you may or may not be correct to assume it's not harmful. I know that the company (Weber) says something to that effect on the can, but consider this: crude oil is "natural" but damned harmful to the environment when spilled. To the best of my knowledge, turpenoid is mineral spirits (i.e. a petroleum distillate) with certain other additives, although the can carries no notation of ingredients. All I'm saying is don't be sure it's harmless.

And btw, I've used it off and on and have no complaints, I just like turpentine better for paint and media and use plain old mineral spirits (paint thinner) to clean brushes cause it's a lot cheaper and since I keep my cleaning can covered, the smell and vapors are not a problem. Just my two cents.

Regards

paintfool
02-21-2002, 11:24 PM
I agree

djstar
02-22-2002, 12:56 AM
I am bad. I have dirty brushes. I wear them out a lot.
BUT I learned a really nifty thing from uncle Miltie:
Store them in a can (ie: coffee) with three or so inches of vegetable oil. Mazola, Wessen, whatever.
If you use the brushes gently, and I assume if you have flag enough left after painting with them, you are using them gently, setting in this slop will keep the oil paint suspended in the bristles and you can practically wipe them clean and start over each session.
NOT to be confused with Linseed, which will harden in both the can and brush, cooking oil is always liquid. It keeps the bristles flexible and fresh, really compatable to using oil paints and since they don't have a chance to dry, there is no digging out deeply embedded pigment.
If you are rough, as I tend to be, and scrub paint INTO the brush, it is sort of like a spa treatment.
My brushes are not gently used and wear out way to fast for me, but since I started doing this to the newer ones, they are actually holding a better shape and I don't NEED to scrub so much to get the paint to flow.
AND HOW BAD DOES THAT SMELL???
Ever cheap, the DJ* solution!!!
dj*

guillot
02-22-2002, 02:02 AM
What a good idea DJstar!! Do you clean the vegetable oil off before continuing? Or do you just wipe them clean and start all over? Just really curious :) ! Does this have an effect on the pigment/linseed oil mix??

Cheryl, I use Bob Ross's brush cleaning method too (the ONLY Bob ross thing also, except for a couple of brushes that have lasted me for quite a long time). I like the drying screen, and the scrub screen, they are pretty "brush friendly". And I like being able to almost completely dry my brush, if the need for a dry brush arises while painting.

I also use Turpenoid Natural but just because you can't smell anything, does not mean that it's not harmful. Can be very deceiving!! We always assume the word "natural" means "unharmful". Wrong, wrong, wrong!! It is still made from petroleum distillates!!

A word or two about those Turp, oil soaked Rags that can combust at the "speed of lightning"; be sure that there is proper ventilation in the bottom of a sealed bucket. The ventilation let's air circulate to let the heat out, so to speak, that helps to eliminate the possibility of spontaneous combustion. I cut holes in the bottom of my plastic bucket, and a couple in the top that I seal the bucket with, and set it on a few bricks for complete air circulation, and I set it OUTSIDE on my patio. So just because you "seal those rags" could actually mean your creating a true hazard if there is no proper ventilation. (gosh,,,,,,now I'm wondering if this was in another thread?!?) Oh well, it's late and I'm tired.

I love you guys...............you make me think :clap:

Tina

Wayne Gaudon
02-22-2002, 07:01 AM
G.L. Hoff & Paintfool

Ok, the can says safe for artist of all ages .. biodegradable.. bla bla not harmful .. I still treat anything with respect but I thought this was about the best that was offered in respect to cleaners and I guess I forgot that anyone can say anything and not have to back it up ..

guillot
.. never too late, that was my next question .. I was thinking, falsely now that you have shed light on the matter, that you could seal the rags in a metal container .. no air .. thanks.

djstar
As per vegetable oil, the time I tried to clean with soap and water and was having trouble, I reached up for the Canola Cooking oil and I got out of the bind .. I would figure any oil would help move the paint and not be harmful to the brush but the way I figure sometimes is going the wrong way on a one way street.

Thanks again,

goldie
02-22-2002, 11:23 AM
I too am only using ivory soap and its the best way! I find I stop twice during the day with a big handfull of brushes and go scrub them with the soap a few times and it keeps my work clean and gives me a time to stop and reflect on what is before me, all part of the flow of the day in the studio. Also I like saying brushes down! reminds me of school, pens down. Its all fun. Got to love being an artist just for the love of it.

G.L. Hoff
02-22-2002, 12:14 PM
Originally posted by djstar
I am bad. I have dirty brushes. I wear them out a lot.
BUT I learned a really nifty thing from uncle Miltie:
Store them in a can (ie: coffee) with three or so inches of vegetable oil. Mazola, Wessen, whatever.
If you use the brushes gently, and I assume if you have flag enough left after painting with them, you are using them gently, setting in this slop will keep the oil paint suspended in the bristles and you can practically wipe them clean and start over each session.
AND HOW BAD DOES THAT SMELL???
Ever cheap, the DJ* solution!!!
dj*

I saw Milt's notation about that in another thread and confess I've never tried it. Others have said to use motor oil (yechhh...) but again, never did it. I'm intrigued and who knows, it might be a better way...

Regards

vknowles
02-22-2002, 12:54 PM
This has been a great topic, extremely helpful! I plan on using many of the ideas posted here. I've been struggling with my brushes for years - I always thought I was getting all the paint out, and I thought I was treating them gently but they always lose their shape & fan out at the top way too fast. One thing that I haven't seen mentioned though is that Master's brand brush soap - it's what I've been using - what's the general opinion on that? I always thought it was ok, but maybe it isn't & that's why my brushes get ruined so quickly. Also, for those of you who soak your brushes (especially the person who soaks them in cooking oil - I want to try that one) how do you do it without the bristles getting bent? Do you use one of those cup things with a coil on top to hold the brush so the bristles don't get flattened? My only concern about that is keeping it from tipping over. As for thinner I've been using mineral spirits in that Silicoil cleaning tank, that thing is great.

DaveTooner
02-22-2002, 01:18 PM
I also use Turpenoid Natural but just because you can't smell anything, does not mean that it's not harmful. Can be very deceiving!! We always assume the word "natural" means "unharmful". Wrong, wrong, wrong!! It is still made from petroleum distillates!!

I don't think we're talking about the same thing here. Turpenoid Natural, DOES have a smell, but it is not harmful.

Here's what I'm talking about...

http://jerryscatalog.com/turnat.html

Wayne Gaudon
02-22-2002, 01:29 PM
... that's the baby I bought, but we may be being mislead.. I'm not home so I can't check the can ..


G.L. Hoff quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by artist
Turopo Cause it's natural and not harmful to me or the enviroment
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm confused. I'm assuming you're talking about "Turpenoid Natural?" If so, you may or may not be correct to assume it's not harmful. I know that the company (Weber) says something to that effect on the can, but consider this: crude oil is "natural" but damned harmful to the environment when spilled. To the best of my knowledge, turpenoid is mineral spirits (i.e. a petroleum distillate) with certain other additives, although the can carries no notation of ingredients. All I'm saying is don't be sure it's harmless.

And btw, I've used it off and on and have no complaints, I just like turpentine better for paint and media and use plain old mineral spirits (paint thinner) to clean brushes cause it's a lot cheaper and since I keep my cleaning can covered, the smell and vapors are not a problem. Just my two cents.

Mario
02-22-2002, 02:49 PM
What's going on here? It's always a great treat to get a thread going on brush cleaning, one can always learn a new twist to the chore....but jeeesh, if assuming the HONOR of plainting in OILS is so scarey and such a daunting task as having to clean your brushes, etc etc...where's does this fall on a scale of one to ten with Vincent the passionate painter as a ten?:confused:
How about a big Zero?

guillot
02-22-2002, 03:33 PM
Sorry Guys, My BAD, BAD, BAD. I'm sorry, I was talking about Turpenoid. Not Turpenoid Natural.....

Gee DaveTooner......I'm so glad you caught that :D

Turpenoid Natural is made from natural "essence" (whatever that term implies) of citrus and other natural sources, and requires no ventilation. Safe and Non-flammable.

Plain ol' Turpenoid has that warning label right on the front of the can..."harmful if fatal or swallowed...COMBUSTIBLE..." and is petroleum based. Flash point is 125F. Since I live in hell :evil: (El Paso), the flash point is an important factor for me. Supposedly it is more expensive than mineral spirits because the harmful aromatic solvents have been removed. (www.gamblincolors.com/materials/solchart.html) The rating on Harmful vapors is "Moderate".

Sorry for the confusion!!!!

Has anyone used Gamsol????

Wayne Gaudon
02-23-2002, 09:28 AM
Mario

.. I'll take a 0 since you are so free with them as it's no concern of mine when people assume they are above it all.

When you live in a tiny little apartment and you paint on one side of your living room and have to cart stuff across your carpets and furniture to get to a tiny kitchen sink to clean your stuff, then cleaning brushes and materials used to best accomodate the job is a concern and knowing the best and most efficient way to do things is not a dumb question.

Later,

kevinjh
02-23-2002, 11:30 PM
Mario, you're right - it's a small issue. I agree with Artist though, that sometimes small issues can be a big obstacle to actually sitting down (or standing up) and painting. The less fuss there is, the more of the canvas you can cover.

Wayne Gaudon
02-26-2002, 01:38 PM
.. tried out the Turp Natural & the Gojo last night .. worked like a charm .. real easy clean up with no unpleasant odor and kept exposure to the cleaner to a minimum of less than a minuite .. rinse, wipe, cover the container.. too cool .. Thanks again to all who offered their help & expertise.

Aspiring
02-27-2002, 04:03 PM
I get all the paint out in a jar of thinner that I keep closed unless in use. The paint goes to the bottom of the jar and stays put. Then after wiping them I dip them in Murphy's oil soap and twirl them around in my palm. Beautiful job it does on bristle and synthetic and sable.