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Artistammy
03-11-2006, 04:25 PM
I ordered a frame recently that came with these metal brackets to hold the backing in place. Would it be really bad to enter a show without a dustcover over these? Those would make it easy to change out paintings from frame to frame if it didn't have the dustcover.
thanks,
Tammy
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Mar-2006/3341-framefastener.jpg

PeggyB
03-11-2006, 05:33 PM
Unless the prospectus specifically says "professional quality framing and matting required" you may enter the show without a dust cover. However, I do know of one gallery owner who was quite upset by an otherwise good painting not having a dust cover. She declared it to be "unprofessional", and something that professional artists should automatically do to help protect the artwork as well as make it easier for her to showcase on an easel where the back would show. She had really liked the painting, and would otherwise have done just that. You should know this gallery owner is also a very successful western art painter herself.

As to ease of changing paintings well it really isn't hard to remove a dust cover. Cut the paper, and when the change out is made to the artwork just put a new piece of paper on the back.

Hope this helps you, and good luck on your show entry.

Peggy

Deborah Secor
03-12-2006, 12:14 AM
I have to agree with Peggy. I'd always put a dust cover on the back for any show or gallery where the work is for sale. It's very easy to recover the back. Do you use double stick tape? I have an ATG (Automatic Tape Gun) that quickly dispenses the double stick tape along the edge. It makes the whole process a snap to do.

Oh-those metal doohickeys are called turnbuttons and are perfectly acceptable to use. Just cover them.

Deborah

Artistammy
03-12-2006, 01:29 PM
For some reason, I wasn't thinking about selling. I would want a dustcover & all if it were for sale. I ought to look into that gun thing to make it faster. I do use double stick tape. Deborah, where did you get yours?
Thanks,
Tammy

PeggyB
03-12-2006, 02:18 PM
I don't know where Deborah got her ATG dispenser, but several of the on line art supply outlets have them. Look for "3M ATG Tape Gun". I found one at ASW (www.aswexpress.com) for $36.99, Dick Blick has the 3M ATG 700 Transfer Tape for $39.99, Jerry's has their own tape dispenser for $39.99, and American Frame is the most expensive for the ATG 700 at $45. You might find one at your local art supply store or ask your framer where they got theirs (but they might not be too cooperative unless you have a very good relationship with them). You can also order the tape that goes with the tape gun at the same time you order the gun.

btw: even if you aren't planning on selling your work it will be better protected from house dust, cigarette smoke and bugs with a backing.

Peggy

Pat Isaac
03-12-2006, 06:13 PM
I agree with everything said above. I always put a dust cover on my paintings, just for protection if nothing else. those tapes dispensers are wonderful.

PAt

PeggyB
03-12-2006, 07:01 PM
For some reason, I wasn't thinking about selling. I would want a dustcover & all if it were for sale. Tammy

One thing I forgot to mention. Many times - in fact most times if it is a national show - sales are a foregone conclusion. Not that the work always sells, but rather that the work must be for sale.

Peggy

Kathryn Wilson
03-14-2006, 08:56 AM
slapping my forehead . . . I never thought of this aspect of entering a painting into a show. Where was my mother when I dressed my painting - :)

Since I've obviously not done this before, what backing do you use? Do you cover the whole back from edge to edge of frame?

Pat Isaac
03-14-2006, 09:05 AM
I use brown kraft paper that comes in rolls. I do cover the whole back from edge to edge. Peggy is right about sales for National Shows, forgot that.

Pat

Artistammy
03-14-2006, 10:22 AM
I do the same. It's also like the brown paper we use to wrap packages for mailing with. Once I found some with a white design on the brown. I loved it but alas it's used up now. Then you dampen it & I like to hurry so I use a blowdryer to dry it. It makes it really tight & professional looking. I tried using some other stuff from scrapbooking that was dispenser (faster) to fasten the paper but when I wet& dried it, it didn't stay stuck everywhere.
Then I put a label that has the name of the painting, medium & my business card on it. With the reusable tape I fasten a short list of instructions how to care for a pastel.

Deborah Secor
03-14-2006, 10:32 AM
There's a very simple way to cover the back that's quickly done using the ATG gun. Zip a strip of tape along the edge, snug up to the outside edge, then cut a piece of craft paper slightly larger than the painting and lay it in place, smoothing it out all the way around. The tape is repositionable, so you can lift spots and make it neat. Then using a one-sided razor blade held thight about an eigth of an inch from the outside edge, and using the rest of your fingers as a guide, zip off the paper around each edge! It's clean, neat, quick and looks really professional. No ziggy lines or rough edges.

I used to spray water as you do, Tammy, and I think that's a perfectly good way to do it, but using this edge technique I don't have to anymore. If it's too tight (like a drum) it rips more easily and I always avoid water in connection with any pastels! So, that's just me...

Deborah

PeggyB
03-14-2006, 03:22 PM
Well described Deborah, and your method is more than "looks really professional" - it is professional! About the only thing a framer would have that you don't is a special tool to do the trimming rather than a razor blade, but that's only because it is minimally faster to use. You're also right about having the paper smooth without being too tight.

Kat - I got a chuckle out of your statement, "Where was my mother when I dressed my painting" - they are a bit like our children aren't they? :lol:

Peggy

Shari
03-14-2006, 09:11 PM
Can anyone please tell me what that trimmer is called and where you get it, where you get the kraft paper and can you cover the back of a metal frame? There is no way to adhere paper to the back of a metal frame that I can see. Also, please tell me where to get the D-rings instead of the eyelets. Thank you so much.

Deborah Secor
03-15-2006, 12:59 AM
I get all of my materials from United Manufacturers Supply, but I think you have to have a Tax ID number. Someone else will know...

Deborah

PeggyB
03-15-2006, 05:13 AM
Can anyone please tell me what that trimmer is called and where you get it, where you get the kraft paper ....

On line you can get a "dust cover trimmer" and refill blades as well as brown backing paper at American Frame (www.americanframe.com (http://www.americanframe.com)) Look under the tab that says "More" and then the listing of "accessories" and then under "frame finishing tools". It isn't all that expensive. Other frame companies probably have it too.
Peggy

chewie
03-15-2006, 10:40 AM
sometimes, even your bigger hardware stores have small packages of the hangers, and diff. sized wires, etc. depending on how much you plan to do, and how fast it needs done, that's kinda handy. i buy my wire in a large roll, but once in a while, i need a heavier wire, and just buy it that way. i dont' have to have the roll hanging around forever, and the expense of something i wont' use often.

as for the strap hanger, usually the one holer is fine. i got the 2 hole type at first, (a box of 100!) then realized that since i use mats, i choose a frame that is a bit narrower--like 1.5 inches--and the width isn't working with the 2holer, i wound up cutting them down to a one-holer. and, the frame company then told me the one hole is the most used, and can hold all i do in general.

for craft paper, i am kinda confused there myself. i use plain stuff i get from anywhere, like walmart, in the shipping supplies. but, its not acid free. i am not sure how important that is tho., its not touching the work, or really, not even the backboard. i know tho many won't use anything but acid free for that. another option, i use wallpaper! its tough, and even slightly water resistant. i choose a design that's not too funky, either. the big problem with that, is all your paintintgs wind up with diff. backs eventually, unless you went and got a truckload of one design! i do like the thickness of it.

i used united manuf. often, and i did need a tax number. also, you have to order $35 of stuff each time. usually that's fine, but sometimes i dont' need anything more than one package of something smaller, and that $35 limit is trouble. again, i hit a hardware store in that case. then stock up!! good luck.

Artistammy
03-15-2006, 11:39 AM
I thought I'd learned alot about framing but still have more to learn.
I also have found D-rings at hardware stores or even discount stores in the hardware dept.
I got my one painting all framed & looking good...delivered it to the artshow yesterday along with 2 others.
Tammy

Pat Isaac
03-15-2006, 11:46 AM
I get the rolls of Kraft paper at the local office supply place i.e. Staples or Office Max. I'm sure it's not acid free, but it doesn't touch anything except the wood frame.

Pat

Kimaris Kobal
03-15-2006, 11:49 AM
Not to be completely stupid, but dustcover?? What is that? Anyone have a picture?

Pat Isaac
03-15-2006, 12:19 PM
A dustcover is the paper that goes on the back of a painting to keep the dust from getting on the inside of the painting. Here is a picture.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Mar-2006/35760-dustcover.jpg It is not possible to put these on metal frames, but there may be something else out there that would work on a metal.

Pat

Kimaris Kobal
03-15-2006, 12:30 PM
A dustcover is the paper that goes on the back of a painting to keep the dust from getting on the inside of the painting. Here is a picture.
It is not possible to put these on metal frames, but there may be something else out there that would work on a metal.
Pat Yikes, I've never seen those, and I've sent out a number of framed works. What kind of paper do you use and how do you affix it to the frame? If you're putting hooks into the frame, it looks like you put the paper on first, then put the hooks through that? Is that right? I've always just used the frame however it came from the store.

[feeling lost at the moment] :confused:

Pat Isaac
03-15-2006, 12:35 PM
I use just plain brown craft paper which I get at a local office store. Yess, I do put the paper on first and attach with this little tool that puts out double sided tape along the frame edge. You can get them at any art store or art catalog.

Pat

Donna A
03-15-2006, 03:35 PM
Oh, something else that is great to do is to get some small-diameter clear plastic tubing from the hardware store----not very expensive at all and you buy by the foot or yard. I cut lengths an inch or two wider than my fist and thread my framing wire through it, then fasten to the D-ring on the other side. It will slip to the side when hanging on the wall, but makes such a wonderful hand-grip when we need to carry our painting for a distance. I have some uncovered wire----large spool bought forever ago and a large spool of covered wire bought a year or so ago. While the covered wire helps the hand a bit, it can still be uncomfortable when I need to carry the medium and larger paintings. It's a really nice touch for ourselves---and anyone else who needs to handle the works. For the pieces already wired, I'll cut a spiral line along the tube and slip it on to the wire. It will work, if I don't want to re-wire! Donna ;-}

Becky Foster
03-15-2006, 05:21 PM
Hi :wave: I used to use brown Kraft paper but had problems with it tearing too easily so now I use a paper from Lineco, I get it from Dick Blick. It's light blue and more durable.

I used to use double-sided tape too, but was having problems with it pulling away on my paintings :confused: , I tried 2 different kinds and always had the problem. Has anyone else had this problem? It would be fine for a couple months and then would just start lifting up. Now I use a polyurethane glue and it works fine, just much more of a hassle. I wonder if anyone else uses glue and what kind they recommend?

I've also taped a lot of dust covers to metal frames - and they actually stay on fine!

-Becky

Shari
03-15-2006, 05:36 PM
Could you please show how you attach the dust covers to metal frames? I have mostly metal frames and I would like to know how to do this. This is my first ever show coming up. Also, I have some mixed media acrylics that will also be in this show and they are on gallery wrap canvases. Is one supposed to put a dust cover on the gallery wrap canvases also? They are so light I was wondering if I should try to do that.

Shari
03-15-2006, 05:37 PM
Could you please show how you attach the dust covers to metal frames? I have mostly metal frames and I would like to know how to do this. This is my first ever show coming up. Also, I have some mixed media acrylics that will also be in this show and they are on gallery wrap canvases. Is one supposed to put a dust cover on the gallery wrap canvases also? They are so light I was wondering if I should try to do that.

Becky Foster
03-15-2006, 06:54 PM
Could you please show how you attach the dust covers to metal frames? I have mostly metal frames and I would like to know how to do this. This is my first ever show coming up. Also, I have some mixed media acrylics that will also be in this show and they are on gallery wrap canvases. Is one supposed to put a dust cover on the gallery wrap canvases also? They are so light I was wondering if I should try to do that.

You really don't need much of an edge to attach the double sided tape. When I put it on metal frames I stuck the tape along the inner edge of the frame back - the hanger clip-thingy was still visible but the frame itself was sealed. I don't know about the gallery wrap canvas, never used it, wonder how you hang it? Because that might be a problem - getting around the hanging wire or whatever you use.

Here's a shot of a metal frame with a dustcover - it was one of my first framing attempts and doesn't look too great but you get the idea :o My later ones came out nicer but this is the only one I have at home.

Hope this helps,
Becky