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View Full Version : Lavender Field - Finished!


Kathryn Wilson
03-01-2006, 03:47 PM
when an artist tries something for the first time - and it sure doesn't look like what the professional just did!

I have the Bob Rohm DVD and have ventured into the realm of underpainting. I've tried underpainting a few times, but not the way Bob does it in his DVD. He makes it looks so easy :eek:

The first photo is from the RIL (I believe) - lavendar fields with a town in the background.

The second one is the start with a sepia hard pastel to do the sketch (so far so good says I) -

The third is where it gets tricky as I still struggle with values. Bob says to pick out the average color in each large shape, then go one warmer and one cooler. (heart starts to skip a beat)

The fourth is where I am in an unknown realm of painting with turpenoid. Using a large flat brush, Bob starts at the top (I immediately get runs down the Wallis paper) and he brushes out the large shapes one at a time, starting with the darks, then going each lighter (except I go from dark to light with nothing in between! it all melts together) (I'm melting, melting says The Wicked Witch of the West to Dorothy). My heart is on the floor in a big puddle, just like Elphaba.

Tomorrow I take this to Open Studio to start the layering. Pray for me - :o

Bhavana Vijay
03-01-2006, 04:36 PM
kat, i am watching with keen interest!!I just LOVE the painting in the third step. Those are delicious colours and those strokes...!Cant wait to see what comes next.

CindyW
03-01-2006, 05:09 PM
You have nothing to fear because this is already going really well. I love the looseness of underpainting. Some underpaintings could live on their own with no further work on them. This is looking great!
Cindy

DrBrad
03-01-2006, 05:27 PM
Great post-- I need to get that video-- I love underpainting and want to learn more about approaches.

KJSCL
03-01-2006, 05:32 PM
The fourth is where I am in an unknown realm of painting with turpenoid. Using a large flat brush, Bob starts at the top (I immediately get runs down the Wallis paper) and he brushes out the large shapes one at a time, starting with the darks, then going each lighter (except I go from dark to light with nothing in between! it all melts together) (I'm melting, melting says The Wicked Witch of the West to Dorothy). My heart is on the floor in a big puddle, just like Elphaba.

Tomorrow I take this to Open Studio to start the layering. Pray for me - :o
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
good for you for trying something different but I don't think you need to be so worried. I'm sure its going to turn out great.

Kathryn Wilson
03-01-2006, 05:44 PM
Thanks for the support guys! I left the underpainting in the studio for an hour or two, then went back to look at it. I see the big shapes (which is a big plus), I see some light and dark values (could be better) -

but now I am excited about getting started. This is the first time I've worked on Wallis Museum grade - 18 x 24. I didn't realize that it does have a bit of a pattern to it, but once the turpenoid dissolved the pastel you don't see it.

Bob's DVD is very much worth the money - he explains everything very well, gives you time to think about what he is doing, and he explanation of the relationship between warm and cool colors is excellent.

Kathryn Wilson
03-01-2006, 05:46 PM
My next problem to solve is to determine my center of interest - it's not really very strong in the photo, but the town tower looks to be it - will have to play that up more than it shows in the photo. (that's artistic license, right :))

John B
03-01-2006, 05:50 PM
This is fascinating I am keen to see how this develops. Good on you for trying something new, lead the way Kat.

John

scall0way
03-01-2006, 06:21 PM
Wow, good for you. I don't know a thing about underpainting and would not know how to begin. I'd be stumped right at the 'one warmer, one cooler' stage. LOL, of course I don't think I even own enough pastels to be able to go one warmer and one cooler for most colors! But I think you're off to a great start and can't wait to see how this develops.

Kathryn Wilson
03-01-2006, 06:39 PM
I'd be stumped right at the 'one warmer, one cooler' stage.

Exactly, I was stumped too. I pulled out 3 greens - one very dark forest green, then I needed a cooler green and a warmer green - not sure I pulled that off! It's a little different than I usually work - I usually pull 3 greens - one dark, one medium value and one light value of the same color family.

Tracy Lang
03-01-2006, 08:03 PM
The underpainting looks great...how fun to try something new! Can't wait to see how it turns out.

Tracy

Punky2
03-01-2006, 08:07 PM
Thanks for posting this. I, for one, and I'm sure many others, learn alot when seeing the early stages of a painting along with the artist's thought processes.
I'm looking forward to seeing the progress of this great start.

Terri

Piper Ballou
03-01-2006, 08:52 PM
Kat, I just tried Bob's video a couple of weeks ago, I followed extactly the video from the start, it was a lot of start, go, rewind for me. I agree the video or DVD is well worth the price, I have yet to try it on something else so will be watching your posts closely...
I think you are being way to hard on yourself.
piper

ponting
03-01-2006, 08:52 PM
I love your heading on this one Kat!! The word TERROR does grab ones attention and very accurately express what you are going through.:lol:

I will be munching away here. Sorry but I my computer won't let me post on WC anymore so I can't supply the popcorn this time. :D

Cheer, Dianna

prettytulips
03-01-2006, 09:59 PM
Kat,

When he tells you to use cold and warm colors is this together or for shadow? Like the lavender, are you using a warmer or cooler tone of purple for shadow vs highlights or does he mean to just merge all the color together?

Thanks for the WIP, I definately should get his video..
K

K Taylor-Green
03-01-2006, 10:14 PM
Well, I'm sure going to learn something here, but girl, you worry too much!
http://www.clicksmilies.com/s0105/teufel/devil-smiley-019.gifNot only is it going to work out, it will be great! And what a gorgeous scene to be working from! Can't you just imagine the fragrance in the air?

Kathryn Wilson
03-01-2006, 10:30 PM
Kat,

When he tells you to use cold and warm colors is this together or for shadow? Like the lavender, are you using a warmer or cooler tone of purple for shadow vs highlights or does he mean to just merge all the color together?


K

He has 5 groupings of pastels - the first group was his darkest darks and within that group, he had his "average" color, and one pastel warmer and one pastel cooler than the average color. i.e. darkest blue, with a cool blue for the distant mountains, and a warm blue for closer objects in the painting.

He uses cooler colors for more distant objects in the painting and gradually warms the colors as he comes forward.

LOL - like I said I was not terribly successful in picking my groupings - I only knew that I wanted a warm red under those lavendar bushes, so I reverted to "my" old way of doing things.

Bob's way of picking those values and hues makes sense, but it will take some time to re-train my brain to think of it that way - and it doesn't mean to say his way is the only way - I just wanted to see if I could improve my painting with something new.

Kathryn Wilson
03-01-2006, 11:10 PM
I will be munching away here. Sorry but I my computer won't let me post on WC anymore so I can't supply the popcorn this time. :D

Cheer, Dianna

Popcorn - my favorite food! Pull up a chair everybody, the popcorn is on me (or my bowl that is - :evil: )

Kathryn Wilson
03-02-2006, 05:10 PM
Next installment . . .

When you get the underpainting completely dry, you start reinforcing your darks - I went a little further than that on this version as I had 3 hours to paint in Open Studio.

I am happy with the sky (it has 3 wonderful flavors in it, but they don't show up) -

and the middle ground is still being worked on, especially the village - but all in all, I am happy with all the values there.

But, I will be re-doing the lavendar rows - not happy with them and I have too much pastel on them to keep going - so, out comes the handy-dandy brush!!

Strange thing about this Museum Wallis - it has a pattern in it - not sure I've heard anyone else talk about that. It freaked me out at first when I first started putting pastel on - but it covers easy enough.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Mar-2006/14941-lavendar-5.jpg

Kathryn Wilson
03-02-2006, 05:15 PM
The colors I used in the sky were 3 Giraults and I think I finally figured out the 3 values for that - I chose a medium blue for the top of the sky, a cool light lemon yellow for the cool value at the horizon, and laid over the top of the two colors a warm salmon pink for the warm value.

Mikki Petersen
03-02-2006, 05:17 PM
Kat, this is looking good! I too have Bob's dvd and it's very helpful for landscapes, I think. The painting I posted today...I was having trouble getting the water to look like water and remembered Bob just dragging his hand down to create reflections and voila! The guy is amazing!

I'll be watching to see how you progress here.

Mikki

meowmeow
03-02-2006, 05:38 PM
Yummy looking, Kat! Good for you for trying something new. And it looks like you are enjoying yourself and coming up with a good painting to boot. I enjoyed watching so far and look forward to seeing the rest.
Not sure I have seen a pattern with the Wallis, but it could be I am used to it so don't pay attention to it anymore. Or, you got a patterned batch! I'm interested if others have noticed it.
Anyhow...keep on girl...you're doing great!

Sandy

binkie
03-02-2006, 05:40 PM
Kyle, this is a great start. I'm pulling up a chair to watch this one progress.

binkie

Alachua Artist
03-02-2006, 05:54 PM
ok - first thing I have to do is buy this video. Second thing I have to do is buy more pastels. I clearly don't have enough! And third, I need to pay attention here as this is so very informative - and brave! Press on!!

Kathryn Wilson
03-02-2006, 06:41 PM
Second thing I have to do is buy more pastels. I clearly don't have enough!

Exactly my problem! I was pulling pastels out of everywhere trying to find those warm and cool values to go with the average color. T'aint easy!

Thanks Sandy and Binkie - your encouragement means a lot to me :wave:

Kathryn Wilson
03-12-2006, 12:33 PM
Next installment. I brushed out all the rows of lavendar and started over again, with the red base still there, I added some dark green hoping that it would show through in places (and it does).

Brushed out the large green tree on the left as I didn't like the shape - a little happier with it now. Added the salmon color to the fields and mountain - I may have to tone it down a bit, but it sure did brighten up the painting.

Added some yellow to the sky. I have yet to do the town - want that to be the very last detail to add. Don't know why - probably procrastination :eek:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Mar-2006/14941-lavendar-6.jpg

Mikki Petersen
03-12-2006, 02:48 PM
Kat this is really looking good. The peachy color in the midground seems to work well, maybe because the foreground is so cool. Love your colors so far.

Mikki

Kathryn Wilson
03-12-2006, 04:20 PM
Thanks Mikki! I have tried every lavender stick I have and this looks too blue - any suggestions?

back to the drawing board!

c&c welcome - comp? color too garish? values?

*Marina*
03-12-2006, 04:50 PM
Love your lavender fields. Kyle, have you tried violet over the blue?

Kathryn Wilson
03-12-2006, 04:58 PM
:) I'm willing to try anything at this point. Whatever I have seems to wash out the colors and turn too light.

*Marina*
03-12-2006, 05:09 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Mar-2006/60850-lavendel500.jpg.



Kat, I took one of my photo's of a lavendar field and enlarged it in photoshop. Have a look at the colours. Succes. :thumbsup:

Kathryn Wilson
03-12-2006, 10:28 PM
Yes, now I can see the colors! Thanks!

Jo Castillo
03-12-2006, 11:18 PM
This is coming along great. I'm enjoying the lesson.
Jo

Katherine T
03-13-2006, 08:29 AM
Kat - this is absolutely fascinating - I couldn't wait for the next update as I was reading through. Thank you for explaining how you're approaching this. How's it going now - nudge, nudge..........

Have you tried Unisons for the lavender colour?

Kathryn Wilson
03-13-2006, 08:34 AM
Hi Katherine - I have tried everything from Unisons to Great Americans to Ludwig, Mount Vision, Art Spectrum. If I put a color on top of this blue - it just fades away. I may have to brush out again.

I will try a violet with red it in tho - worth a shot.

-------------

You know how you carry a painting with you all day in your mind - it happened that I thought these mounds needed some tonal sculpting too. Keeping in mind all the lessons about deeper colors in front going back to lighter colors in the rear - not sure how that is going to work here, as my artist eye wants to put the lighter color up front and let it darken as it goes back to the end of the row.

Katherine T
03-13-2006, 08:37 AM
Well Kyle to be honest I think whoever posted that image has already photoshopped it a bit as lavender simply isn't that blue in Provence, (nor ar the mountains quite that Fauvist!)

It's a good strong colour but not quite the colour shown. How about if you looked at some other reference sources for a lavendar colour which is more typical?

Katherine T
03-13-2006, 08:39 AM
This is the website of the Norwich Lavender company (http://www.norfolk-lavender.co.uk/Content/default.asp) - but the colour is just the same as that seen in Provence.

Kathryn Wilson
03-13-2006, 06:23 PM
Excellent suggestion!

Kathryn Wilson
03-23-2006, 04:29 PM
A lot of personal stuff got in the way of getting this done - but I needed to get it done.

I had the worst time with the lavender, but finally got it to where I was happy with it - and then the photo doesn't show up all the wonderful colors and little bits that are in that lavender. Dang.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Mar-2006/14941-Lavender-7-wc.jpg

Comments always welcome -

Kathryn Wilson
03-23-2006, 04:57 PM
Here's a close-up: still not showing all the detail, but better.

Tressa
03-23-2006, 05:32 PM
This is quite a lovely piece, Kyle..I love the buildings and the perspective is great!! The lavender is a little blue for me, but that could be the monitor. I know some of my pics do not pick up the true colors...

Kathryn Wilson
03-23-2006, 05:35 PM
You are so right - there's all kinds of lavender in that blue - my camera just didn't pick it up until I did that close-up.

Tressa
03-23-2006, 05:36 PM
aaahhh, missed the close up..:)

Susan Borgas
03-23-2006, 05:43 PM
Kat I have just found this thread and love it. You are not afraid to give it a go and share with others your struggles along the way. In the end you have achieved a beautiful painting that many watched developed, and we learnt a lot as well. :clap: :clap:

K Taylor-Green
03-23-2006, 06:13 PM
Kat, I think it turned out beautifully!

Shari
03-23-2006, 07:08 PM
Kat,

This is great, thank you for showing this demo. After I bought Bob's DVD, I went right to work on a piece that ended up being one of my favorite ones. I think it's hard to do it just the way he does but what you are doing is wonderful. When the paper's tooth gets too full, I spray the lascaux fixative on that area so I can rework it and that seems to be all it needs, that and a little brushing out first. I think this is lovely and you are so brave to demo a new technique that you've never tried before.

Punky2
03-23-2006, 07:54 PM
This is so beautiful! I love the close up that shows all the beautiful colors.

Terri

Kathryn Wilson
03-23-2006, 08:58 PM
Shari - to tell you the truth, this is the first time I've used Wallis Museum and have had a tough time getting used to it. I am amazed at the amount of pastel it can hold and I am also appauled at the amount of pastel in my trough at the bottom of my easel - enough to make another pastel stick!

I think I will stick to smaller paintings from this stock - too expensive to work on.

Terri - I'm glad you enjoyed the close-up - there is so much detail lost to a camera lens.

Bhavana Vijay
03-23-2006, 11:53 PM
Kat, this has turned out to be gorgeous!! I like how you have emphasised details in your painting to make it more interesting, like that bunch of twigs behind the rows of lavender, i really didnt notice it when i saw the photograph the first time. I am sure this is more of a stunner in real.

Artistammy
03-24-2006, 10:09 AM
Too bad we can't see it in person but it looks fabulous. Cameras & computers can be so irritating when they can't capture the real look of our art.
Tammy

Khadres
03-24-2006, 12:38 PM
Lovely! I love the loose, non-picky feel it has and yet seems to have oodles of detail when it really only hints at them! You're a real Houdini with pastels!

Kathryn Wilson
03-24-2006, 04:25 PM
Bhavana and Tammy - thanks for your lovely comments - :)

Sooz - Houdini, eh? Weaving a magic spell over my pastels - interesting. Have you read "Wicked" yet?

t-sue
03-24-2006, 08:42 PM
oooooh..... Kat!!! WOnderful thread!!! Question... can one do the undepainting (if it's being done wet) with the paper flat instead of vertical on the easel? Thanks so much for doing this....It's going to be beautiful and a great help to those of us who haven't tried this yet!! :~)

Kathryn Wilson
03-24-2006, 09:29 PM
Hi Tammy - thanks for taking a look.

I would think if you wanted to lay your paper down flat for the underpainting that would be okay. It certainly would eliminate the runs - although the runs disappeared under the pastel anyway.

Westerngirl
03-25-2006, 11:41 AM
Kyle, you were very brave on this one! and the painting turned out lovely.

I'm still trying to get my confidence up to try it Bob's way. Like one of my instructors likes to say, I "need to deal with the fear issue"! :lol:

Kathryn Wilson
03-25-2006, 11:47 AM
I always say, what have I got to lose other than a sheet of paper and some pastels. If you use Wallis, you can always wash it off and start again (and DonnaA tells us you can do the same with Art Spectrum).

The time and effort is worth it as I always learn something from every painting, even if it a non-keeper.

bnoonan
03-25-2006, 12:37 PM
Kat - just dropping in for a quick look and here to send my huge round of applause!!! Outstanding piece and well done on the demo!!

Barb

Paula Ford
03-25-2006, 12:40 PM
I love it Kat! It's really beautiful and vibrant!

Paula

*Marina*
03-25-2006, 02:10 PM
Turned into a beautiful painting. Pleased you managed to finish it. Must be very sastisfying after all the struggle you had.

Kathryn Wilson
03-25-2006, 02:47 PM
Aw shucks, mam, er, Barb - :) Sooo good to see you - miss ya!

Thanks Paula - it seems our art is so different - mine so vibrant and yours so cool and calm. Is it our personalities? I strive to paint like you and this is what I get - how does that happen?

Applebee, satisfied that I completed it, yes - satisfied with the painting, never! There is so much that I like about it, and yet, so much that I'd like to do over. Are we ever satisfied with our paintings?

*Marina*
03-25-2006, 03:14 PM
Know the feeling. Don't we all. :)