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snakum
02-14-2002, 11:37 AM
I'm still playing around with different mediums - I've tried just about all combinations/recipes now except copal and maroger - and I wanted to try the following combination:

Underpainting using Galkyd (supposed to be less darkening than Liquin, no danger of delamination like Liquin, but dries equally as fast).

Opaque passages with simple turps and a little refined, aged linseed oil.

Glazes with refined, aged linssed oil and Canada Balsam (I read that Canada Balsam assist adhesion and will trap the light withn a glazed passage for a VERY jewel-like appearance). Medium brushed on the surface and a very small drop of the oil in the paint pile before scrubbing/painting it in.

Initial varnish with Galkyd (I've read posts from many people who prefer to use Galkyd/Galkyd Lite for varnishing rather than a retouch recipe, they say it evens out gloss like damar and provides a rock hard varnish coat.)

Anyone have experience with these particular methods/recipes?

Minh

vallarta
02-16-2002, 04:54 PM
The medium DOES NOT make a good painting. Good Painting does not need a good medium.

vallarta

Luis Guerreiro
02-19-2002, 10:47 AM
Originally posted by vallarta
The medium DOES NOT make a good painting. Good Painting does not need a good medium.
vallarta

With all due respect, I have to challenge this as a very wrong statement, please do not take it personally.
Firstly, please let me know what you mean by "Good Painting". I think "Good Painting" means a lot of things and nothing at all simultaneously.
Secondly, although you don't necessarily need a medium to paint, it DOES make a difference to use mediums.
Thirdly, technically sound "good painting" GREATLY benefits from using mediums. The last 500 years of oil painting prove it beyond any possible doubt. The first thing any oil painter should know is his/her materials, what they do, their properties and how they can be used to achieve all the desired effects in an oil picture. This is a principle applicable to oil painting in any style or school of practice. There are so many examples that I could sit here writing volumes on the subject.
It is the painters decisions on ALL aspects of a given picture that make that picture benefit from mediums.
And by the way, oil paint as it comes out of the tube already has 1 medium: oil.
Regards
Luis :eek:

Luis Guerreiro
02-19-2002, 11:06 AM
Originally posted by snakum
I'm still playing around with different mediums - I've tried just about all combinations/recipes now except copal and maroger - and I wanted to try the following combination:
Underpainting using Galkyd (supposed to be less darkening than Liquin, no danger of delamination like Liquin, but dries equally as fast).
Opaque passages with simple turps and a little refined, aged linseed oil.
Glazes with refined, aged linssed oil and Canada Balsam (I read that Canada Balsam assist adhesion and will trap the light withn a glazed passage for a VERY jewel-like appearance). Medium brushed on the surface and a very small drop of the oil in the paint pile before scrubbing/painting it in.
Initial varnish with Galkyd (I've read posts from many people who prefer to use Galkyd/Galkyd Lite for varnishing rather than a retouch recipe, they say it evens out gloss like damar and provides a rock hard varnish coat.)
Anyone have experience with these particular methods/recipes?
Minh

Hi Snakum,
I don't really know "Galkyd" so I can't express a technically valid opinion about this particular point. However, I just would like to remind you to calculate medium composition in respect of the fat-over-lean (more flexible-over-less flexible) rules. You're right about Canada Balsam, which is a natural resin, the best available, although I would also suggest Strasbourg Turpentine, a thick resin from the fir tree, with similar properties and of course Venice Larch Turpentine (which take longer to dry than the other 2).
I would suggest a mix of 90% turpentine and 10% stand oil for your underpaintings. Upper layers may benefit from other mediums, but I don't know your particular style of painting, so it is diffifult to give sound advice in respect of recipes. I almost always use a oil/resin medium for upper layers, because I like the finish it gives, glossy vitreous which in practice exempts the picture from being varnished for a long time, but this is by no means a standard medium for all purposes. That's why there are so many mediums. I also use Maroger, home-made at the studio or otherwise (Walnut Oil cooked as Black oil mixed with double mastic varnish).
Regards
Luis ;)