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Crias
02-14-2002, 01:54 AM
Someone asked to see my process for doing a wood burning; so here is the most recent burning.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2002/malheadpic.jpg
First find the picture you want to burn (if you work from pics).

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2002/malhead1.jpg
Transfer a sketch to the wood.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2002/malhead2.jpg
Then start burning...I like to start with my darkest areas, but this is just me.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2002/malhead3.jpg
And burn...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2002/malhead4.jpg
And burn some more.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2002/malhead.jpg
This is the finished piece, though unstained.

This is a burning of a Belgian Malinois. It will be donated to their breed rescue raffle at their breed's National Show.

Thanks for looking, and all comments welcome and appreciated!

sassybird
02-14-2002, 04:40 AM
Cathy, do you pull the burning tip along an area moving it back over until you get the desired burn, or do you use a pointilism type technique? I guess I am thinking about how to get line quality as well as value with burning.

Crias
02-16-2002, 01:12 AM
Originally posted by sassybird
Cathy, do you pull the burning tip along an area moving it back over until you get the desired burn, or do you use a pointilism type technique? I guess I am thinking about how to get line quality as well as value with burning.

I use both pointilism and lines. For the vast majority of my burning I like to use a circular motion. I press down harder in the black areas and don't even touch (or barely) the wood in lighter areas. This creates a more varies shade than lines. There are some areas where I use a line, like details of eyes, and some specific dark areas that are finer.

I have gone into photoshop to show where I used different techniques...

Red- circular shading
Green- line shading
Blue- Pointilism (nose and whisker area)

In some of my previous pieces I have used more line areas to show longer hairs, which were not needed in this horter haired dog.

joemajury
02-16-2002, 02:01 PM
It was me, that asked you to show.
Im glad you did, this is fascinating.
Thank you.

Joe
;) ;)

Leaflin
03-02-2002, 09:26 AM
Wow Cathy!
Thanks for the demo.
That really is fascinating how much detail you get.
Wonderful work :)

joemajury
03-20-2002, 09:13 AM
Glad to see this thread get the STICKY it deserved !!

Joe
;) ;)

TeAnne
04-03-2002, 07:53 PM
What kind of tool do you use?
All that comes to mind is a hot soldering iron. What are the risks of fire?
Nice work btw :D

TracyN
04-08-2002, 07:51 PM
Originally posted by TeAnne
What kind of tool do you use?
All that comes to mind is a hot soldering iron

I was wondering the same thing. What do you use? Also, can we see a stained/finished piece? I'd love to see the effect stain has on it. I've always wanted to try my hand at wood burning. It's beautiful!

Crias
05-18-2002, 03:08 PM
Hey folks....sorry for the long delay! I have been off wet canvas for some time and just came back after getting on DSL. Cool...I get a sticky! :)

Anyways regarding the tool used. There are several types of wood burning tools. Some have tempurature guages that can be adjusted to change the tempurature. I use a $12 burner from walnut hollow (www.walnuthollow.com), which can be purchased at most craft stores, or even wal-mart in their crafts section! It does not have variable tempurature settings, just plug it in, let it heat up, and go! My burner has four tips that came with it for different uses. Unfortunately you have to let the burner cool down to change tips, so I tend to use mostly one tip. I am looking for a really fine tip to use for detail work, but haven't found one yet. Some burners can be range over $200, but so far I have not made a major investment.

Staining can really affect the looks of a peice. I have been using a clear stain mostly so far, so it doesn't affect the looks too much. I don't ahve anything scanned that is stained, so I can't show that, but will try and remember to at some point!

inisheerstudio
01-19-2003, 12:49 PM
Very nice......plus what a great thing to do to donate to the breed rescue!

:angel:

gnu
01-21-2003, 03:56 AM
I've done some of this!! I'd forgotten...love this fella...well done!!!:clap: :clap: :cat:

sugarca
01-23-2003, 11:42 AM
I've had that same tool for 2 years and haven't used it.
I really like what you did. I had no idea how to start
and I had no idea it could be so beatiful. Thanks
for sharing!


:clap: :clap:

val...

RaeBuckner
02-15-2003, 11:00 PM
Joe sent me over here... err linked me here at least.

I also do wood-burning with the little pens (got mine from wal-mart.. actually have two though).

A little tip, in order to change the hot point tips... use a pair of metal pliers gently grasp it and unscrew it with that.. place it on a safe (non-flammable) flat place.. and still using the plyers screw the next one in place, within in a few sec it will be getting hot an minute or maybe longer it's fully hot and ready to use (much better then waiting for it to cool down completely).

I mostly do rustic looking items.. in fact have sold quite a few 'Garden Signs' in which it is a very simple rustic sign ...

I do a range from, Scriptures, Garden Saying Signs, Nursery Rhymes, to cartoons.

I use carbon paper to trace mine first... then burn them in, with a few slight free-hand adjustments :). One small garden sign takes usually a hour's work plus adding sealer :).

I'll attach a couple of pics.. ~RaeBuckner~

RaeBuckner
02-15-2003, 11:02 PM
This is some blocks I made for my nephew.. last Christmas
he's 2 yrs old.. an loved them :D.

RaeBuckner
02-15-2003, 11:05 PM
This is one of my most detailed ... did this from a picture of one of my fish (betta splendens) .. I usually work from computer graphics with hard lines.. so this was a bit of a challenge for me. Made it for some friends of mine last Christmas as well :cool:

**should mention this is posted with my friends permission... :)

SueW16
02-26-2003, 09:57 AM
Hi Cathy,
Nice to see there are woodburners here!:) That's my main form of art right now. You've done a great job and provided a really good tutorial.
I'm pretty much into wildlife and animal burning. This is a sample of the sort of thing I do.
It'll be good to share some techniques.
Regards,
Sue:)

Crias
03-02-2003, 12:30 AM
Hi Sue! I am very much of an amature burner, but really use the same techniques I use for my other mediums (pencil, scratchboard, etc.) My father recently got one of the $150 burners. I guess it heats up and cools down much faster then my cheepo burner, which makes it much more practical to change tips in the middle of a project. What type of burner do you have?

I did all of my first burnings on pine, which I later learned is quite a difficult wood to burn on (due to grain). While home for a couple of weeks recently I got a whole bag of "scrap woods" from my dad (he does lathe work) and want to try the various types of woods to learn how they differ in the way they burn. He buys many types of very pretty woods, so it sould be fun! Actually, I have yet to burn on basswood, which is the normal burning wood in the US!

So MANY projects, so little time ;)

Welcome to WC (I welcomed you in the animal arts forum too). I don't check in over here too often, but check into the animal arts forum on a regular basis. I look forward to seeing more of your work!

SueW16
03-03-2003, 10:41 PM
G'day again Cathy:)
I saw you over in wildlife...thanks for the welcome:) Boy...some great wildlife and animal work in there....I'm drooling.
I started on pine too...that's pretty much all I knew what to burn on in the beginning. In Oz we don't have very many pale soft woods, not like up North, so we have to make do.
I work a heap on basswood and ply and mally and some native woods now....except for working picture frames, which I can only get in pine. I also do quite a bit of paper burning and leather burning...but mainly tagua burning...kind of real miniature realism stuff...which I love doing. (Probably because I wasn't first in line when patience was being handed out...I can't wait for a piece to be finished but wan't tons of detail....so small work suits me.)
I think starting on a difficult wood like pine makes you a better burner. You learn the finess and control much faster.
Re what I use to burn. Yep....no doubt in my brain that a variable temp iron will allow you the detail and texture that a set temp, soldering iron type wont. Don't get me wrong...set temp is good...but variable temp gives you scope that it can't...especially in the nib changing and nib variety department. Mind you, I only use 3 nibs in just about everything I do. (Elephant eye was done with jyst 2 nib styles.)
The one I use is Razertip. It's a Canadian model, much like the Optima system, which I've heard is as good. I can give you some private advice on this, 'cause I don't really want to bag any burning systems in public<G>
Keep trying the different woods. It's amazing what effect some will give you. Some will be a waste of space...others will get your mind ticking over big time.
I try different wood now and then and found a special effect on one we have here....called Silky Oak. It's like needle wood in a way....sort of. Anyway...I was playing around and found this wood burnt oddly. It wouldn't hold a sharp line, but I found a shading nib burnt some parts hot and left others quit cool....it gave a shimmering pattern. So I had a think and decided it would suit and underwater picture. I did a platypus diving...hmm...but I can't find the image...so, if you want to have a look you'll have to cut and paste the link here if it doesn't hyperlink.
http://www.suewalters.com/images/PlatypusDiving.jpg
I'm with you...so many projects...so little time:)
Best be off,
Horoo:)

Hi Sue! I am very much of an amature burner, but really use the same techniques I use for my other mediums (pencil, scratchboard, etc.) My father recently got one of the $150 burners. I guess it heats up and cools down much faster then my cheepo burner, which makes it much more practical to change tips in the middle of a project. What type of burner do you have?

I did all of my first burnings on pine, which I later learned is quite a difficult wood to burn on (due to grain). While home for a couple of weeks recently I got a whole bag of "scrap woods" from my dad (he does lathe work) and want to try the various types of woods to learn how they differ in the way they burn. He buys many types of very pretty woods, so it sould be fun! Actually, I have yet to burn on basswood, which is the normal burning wood in the US!

So MANY projects, so little time ;)

Welcome to WC (I welcomed you in the animal arts forum too). I don't check in over here too often, but check into the animal arts forum on a regular basis. I look forward to seeing more of your work! [/QUOTE]

ArtistGary
12-24-2003, 02:45 PM
I can hardly wait to try this. Great demo, especially after learning about which burning tools to use.
Gary

Kalibabe
12-26-2003, 05:22 AM
This stuff all looks fabulous.

Can I ask a few questions...??

I have looked at pyrographs (sp?) on the net and they are SCARY prices. The cheapest one is about 85 or so. They do sell soldering irons but, I ahve been told that they are not 'fine' enough for wood burning.

I would love to give this technique a try. I have wood piles all over my house. I am just concerned about spending so much, maybe to find I am useless at wood burning...


So, would I do a search for woodburning?
Or Pyrography?
Or do you think that soldering irons are ok?

Is it just the UK that has such high prices for these things?



Lovely work btw lol

i'm just nosy

Kalibabe
12-26-2003, 05:33 AM
Ok, have just found a link in the UK that includes some Ok priced wood burning tools...

http://www.burhouse.co.uk/products2.asp?cat=HAND%20TOOLS&subcat=PYROGRAPHY


If anyone in the UK is interested. Spent all my wages for this month already, so will ahve to wait a while anyways.

:D

adamjw
01-02-2004, 12:06 AM
Hi Cathy,

You said:
all comments welcome and appreciated![



So here goes, I have two comments about your artwork.



1. I really like it, and I think it's very well done.

2. I do have one problem with the image though. :(

The signature placement was really bothering me
while I looked at the picture. It's probably just me though.

My suggestion is to place it a little more to the right,
put it on a line, and make it a little smaller.

Does anyone agree with me?

Hopefuly I'm only being informative, because I really don't
want to put down your work.

In the end it's not really my opinion that matters though,
so go with the way you like it. :)



Adam :cool:

gnarledwolf
10-28-2004, 07:05 PM
Cathy,
I'm still new to this forum, do you still do woodburning... I was noticing the post was a bit ago.
-gnarledwolf-

Crias
10-29-2004, 09:29 AM
Hi Folks-

Sorry I have not replied to this thread in quite a while. I don't come into this forum very often. I still do some ocassional burning, but it is a secondary medium for me. We have a couple of really fantastic burners over in the animal forum (where I spend most of my time). Definately look up Indiana_Jim's work and of course Sue, who posted above.

Kali did you ever get a burner? Show us how you did :)

Adam, I don't mind the comment at all about the signature. With my tips it is nearly imposible to go smaller than what I did for a signature, but where to put my signature is always an unknown for me.