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impressionist2
02-10-2002, 08:02 PM
I don't use Raw Umber nearly enough, I am thinking, so just wondered what everyone does with this color.

Recently I used it to push back a too intense flesh color in the shadow and it worked great. I have mixed it with ultra blue to make a black but it's not my favorite colorful black. I prefer aliz. crimson/thalo green.

So, do you favor this color? It's a cool color, correct? What is your favorite way to use it?

Renee

bruin70
02-10-2002, 10:23 PM
be careful with it because it can easily kill your color. raw umber varies greatly from manufacturer to manufacturer.....{M}

Patrick1
02-11-2002, 12:59 AM
Question: how do you use raw umber (especially in oils) without it turning everything else dirty, muddy-looking? Raw umber seems like one of the dirtiest-looking pigments of all.

Renee, technically raw umber is a warm color (since it's essentially a very desaturated yellow-orange color...very similar relative hue as yellow ochre, if I rememebr). But it is certainly cooler (more greenish/greyish) than most other 'browns'. So it's all relative.

djstar
02-11-2002, 01:36 AM
and then I saw you said RAW umber.
I have some...
It does seem flatter than my burnt umber and a black hole of a color.
I use BURNT umber all the time and I think it is a real nice neutral to sketch with for an underpainting alla prima.

I remember squeezing out some this last week, and for the life of me I think all I did was use it to create a variety in brown hair.
Next time I see it, I will try to remember what I was thinking!
dj*

bruin70
02-11-2002, 03:54 AM
Originally posted by Domer
Question: how do you use raw umber (especially in oils) without it turning everything else dirty, muddy-looking? Raw umber seems like one of the dirtiest-looking pigments of all.

Renee, technically raw umber is a warm color (since it's essentially a very desaturated yellow-orange color...very similar relative hue as yellow ochre, if I rememebr). But it is certainly cooler (more greenish/greyish) than most other 'browns'. So it's all relative.

the second part of your reply answers the first. firstly,,,it depends on how much RU you use. secondly it is quite good at taming really strong color. thirdly, it all depends on your color combinations.....{M}

impressionist2
02-11-2002, 06:22 AM
Bruin70 wrote: "secondly it is quite good at taming really strong color."

So, then I inadvertently stumbled upon a good use for raw umber.

A neck color was way too intense, pulling it forward. One small "splob" of RU added to the fleshmix and it made it sit down and pushed it back. In fact, I remember saying "wow, alright!".

That is a good use for it, and reason enough to keep it at least on the sidelines in case the fleshmix gets out of hand.

Thanks.

Renee

bruin70
02-11-2002, 08:38 AM
it's best to "discover" as you did, impy, because by then you have integrated its uses into your schemes.

btw, whistler used a ton of RU,,,but as you know, his paintings are very dark and broodish.

i prefer grumbacher because it is the most grey. the others are too brownish.....{M}

Andrew
02-13-2002, 12:54 PM
I use a rather lot of raw umber, but I tend to lean heavily on the more earthy tones. I have discovered that I prefer to use RU for my underpaintings and yellow oxide/yellow ochre for modifying colors. Burnt Umber and the Siennas I use freely either way.

Andrew

Einion
02-13-2002, 10:03 PM
Patrick beat me to it but yes, it's technically a warm colour. This <A HREF=http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/earthp.html>earth pigments tour</A> is worth a look, although in oils the values can be quite different so the comments might be a little misleading. As Milt says it varies a lot, most grades are distinctly cooler than Burnt Umber and more subtle in tints and glazes, because it tends to be the most neutral of the common earth colours. I prefer the greener grades (supposedly a sign of quality) typified by Winsor & Newton's, over the warmer, more orange-biased grades as it is more distinct from Burnt Umber. It is generally slightly more transparent than BU with less staining power.

I think one of its beauties lies in its tints, used alone or with blacks or blues it makes for a range of nice neutrals (having trouble nailing that shadow colour on a white wall?) and this is how I use it most; being slightly less staining than BU it is slightly easier to control in such mixes but either will do the job. You can see from the mixing complements table I refer to <A HREF=http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=32745>here</A> that it is also a very valuable neutraliser for blues at the violet end of the spectrum which I suspected but is nice to have confirmation of. I prefer the dark mixed from Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber though as it is darker valued even if it's not quite so neutral apparently (close enough though).

In landscape painting many people depict dry soil too saturated and warm and except in rich farmland it is often much more neutral; Raw Umber is a perfect base for these areas. Mixed with black or Cobalt Blue it also makes a good weathered wood colour and not surprisingly also for bark. Mixed with Phthalo Blue it makes a good shadow colour for woodland scenes. It's good for urban scenes too as it makes a good base for concrete which may have a slight green cast.

I shy away from using it in flesh mixes, preferring to use colours whose effects with the warm base are more predictable. It's good for depicting pallor though, like a verdaccio showing through a thin overpainting.

Einion

DebAnnWea
02-19-2002, 12:14 PM
have you ever seen a round table,that had that sanded look(I hope you know what I mean by that word) with kind of lacquer or an orangey looking schlak(correct spelling?) ?

well I used raw umber for my table.it looks kind of pretty that way,I think....of course some may disagree.:)

DebAnnWea
02-19-2002, 12:27 PM
:( I can't delete my messages,so all I can say is oops,I thought it was raw umber I used,but I looked again at my W&N chart on the wall and found it was raw sienna ,that I had used

Bendaini
03-05-2002, 07:14 PM
Sometimes i thin it out a great deal and use it as a wash over top of a painting already dry. I do that with white to add highlights as well.

I like it with blue to get black, its the only balck i will use. My actual black tube of paint is still full and i do a lot of painting in the dark so to speak :) (i'm going to have to try that green and red one too now)

I also use it to creat flesh tones. A tiny amount of raw siena and a lot of white, and just a touch of red to get a nice fleshy color. Considering i only have 8 colors at the moment this works pretty good atm.

Oh, and normal shadowing of course. I don't use black hardly ever like i said because i like the color in my paintings.

arourapope
03-13-2002, 07:20 PM
Wow! We are all really so different in our techniques. I love my raw umber. I go through a ton of it in fact. I use it in my "blacks," in my greys; I sketch things out with it (it dries super fast). Definately one of my favorite colors.
And it's quite lovely next to perm alziron crimson too. :D
Aurora