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Muddimers
01-13-2006, 11:27 AM
Please can someone advise having nearly mastered encasing i now find that unless i put my bead in the kiln while glowing -it is cracked when i remove it from the kiln.

This is hard enough to deal with but how if your bead needs to glow when put in the kiln can one apply raised dots without completely melting them in.

Am i perhaps encasing too thickly how do you get a thin layer on is it best to apply the clear in dots all over the bead.
Please would someone advise.

TheRealCosmo
01-13-2006, 12:26 PM
What kind of clear are you using to encase?

In soft glass, I only use Lauscha clear, which does have to go into the kiln glowing. You can still put raised dots on it or whatever you want to do. Just warm it in the back of the flame before you put it into the kiln.

To make a thin layer of encasing, change the angle your clear rod meets your bead. The first pic is for a thick encasing. The second is for a thin encasing.

richsantaclaus
01-13-2006, 03:34 PM
Great diagram Chad - I use the same technique too.

Dawnt0721
01-13-2006, 04:01 PM
What kind of clear are you using to encase?

In soft glass, I only use Lauscha clear, which does have to go into the kiln glowing. You can still put raised dots on it or whatever you want to do. Just warm it in the back of the flame before you put it into the kiln.

To make a thin layer of encasing, change the angle your clear rod meets your bead. The first pic is for a thick encasing. The second is for a thin encasing.

This is great advice! How do you guys encase? Big blob, around the world...?? I'm playing with different methods myself. Right now I'm trying the big blob type but I can't get it even.

MaureenKennedy
01-13-2006, 04:14 PM
Well I am glad you understand it Rich, because I certainly don't understand above diagram. They look like mirror images, though I might grant there is a degree or two difference in angles. Using diagram like that is simplistic imagery without some discussion of what it's intent is.

smcgypsea
01-13-2006, 07:40 PM
the pictures show to push the glass on, thereby adding more without 'stretching', and the other shows to drag the glass on, thereby stretching the rod to a smaller amount all the way around, kinda like caulking a bathroom or kitchen.

TheRealCosmo
01-13-2006, 07:48 PM
This is great advice! How do you guys encase? Big blob, around the world...?? I'm playing with different methods myself. Right now I'm trying the big blob type but I can't get it even.
I encase almost up to the ends of the bead. Then, I heat just the ends of the encasing and use a tungsten pick to drag the clear to the end of the bead. Make sure the base bead is cool so when you drag the clear, only the clear moves.

Well I am glad you understand it Rich, because I certainly don't understand above diagram. They look like mirror images, though I might grant there is a degree or two difference in angles. Using diagram like that is simplistic imagery without some discussion of what it's intent is.

There's actually about 90 degrees difference in angle. To do a thick layer of encasing, you angle the cool end of the rod the direction you are encasing. To do a thin layer, angle the cool end away from the direction you are encasing.

Sorry my diagram is so simplistic. It's the best I could do on such short notice.:(

richsantaclaus
01-13-2006, 08:10 PM
Hey Maureen, it's only one of the ways I encase... I LOVED your method + have come up with different ones since I have been making marbles...lol

BabsW
01-13-2006, 10:57 PM
I hate it when the core color bleeds at the holes so after I marver the core I apply clear to the ends. This is especially for florals.

As for general encasing, I use all methods. It depends on the size of the bead and the technique.

Barbara

ziggy
01-13-2006, 11:01 PM
Hmmmm,
Are you "striping" the rod along the length of the bead?
with the mandrel going <------> this way?
Thanks,
Ziggy
Still got a long way to go on encasing :P

TheRealCosmo
01-14-2006, 09:49 AM
Hmmmm,
Are you "striping" the rod along the length of the bead?
with the mandrel going <------> this way?
Thanks,
Ziggy
Still got a long way to go on encasing :P

Yes, that's the way I do it. From hole to hole.

ziggy
01-14-2006, 07:09 PM
Yes, that's the way I do it. From hole to hole.


Thanks for the clarification. I never thought about which angle to hold the rod while encasing.
Of course I am so flustered while I am trying not to destroy my bead, that I barely notice what I am doing :o
angela

MaureenKennedy
01-14-2006, 07:16 PM
Oh, now it makes more sense - core to core. I kept trying to figure out where the mandrel would be on the bead. I only use core to core on long tube beads.

ByrdBeads
01-15-2006, 03:30 PM
Have you tried using stringer? I can get the thinnest layer using stringer. If I need thicker I just put another layer on till im happy. I dont seem to have as much of a problem smudging the under design as I used to using a reg sized rod. I still use a reg sized rod when using colors toencase but I put a thin layer of clear usig the stringer on first so the design is "set" so to speak.

ziggy
01-18-2006, 04:09 PM
Hi
I never thought of doing a super thin coating to set it,and then being able to put on another thick casing if I wanted. Nice tip!
Ziggy

Liann Beads
01-18-2006, 07:28 PM
I tried the stringer method and I can still see 'stripes' in the clear even after I melted it in. What am I doing wrong? Lisa

grandbeads
01-18-2006, 08:31 PM
I also get stripes on the hole to hole method.Mostly now I use the big blob.It just seems to be so much easier to melt it all at once and put it on .The right amount,as in presses,just seems natural after a while.I like the diagram,Chad...Roger.

Paula D
01-18-2006, 10:15 PM
I have never done it that way and will have to try it! Smircich showed us another way this weekend. Paula

vivbama
01-18-2006, 10:32 PM
When you see stripes it's because you didn't get a solid encase. In other words you only covered part of the base & the part of the base you didn't cover seeped up some & caused a stripe.

ratsnest
01-19-2006, 02:51 PM
I use stringer to encase too. I find it goes somehow faster and I go back and forth from left to right while turning. Sometimes I miss an area and get some air in there and "pop" goes everything, but it works most of the time.

jberts
01-20-2006, 05:16 PM
I find Encasing is one of the hardest things for me to do. But just when I was really frustrated and about to give up.......I did it! I guess the PPP method prevails again.

Emily
01-20-2006, 07:53 PM
To get back to the cracking issue -- sounds like you might not be keeping good core heat in your bead center. If your beads come out cracked the whole way through, it might be that your center has begun to crack even while you're encasing. Yes, I know that your base bead needs to be cool so that it doesn't smear when you encase -- but you can't let it get too cool. (If you ever hear anyone say that encasing is easy, let me know so I can whack them upside the head with a 25mm rod of boro.)

You need what Smircich calls "insurance" heat. Every so often, you have to pause and give your bead a gentle but thorough heating. You heat it then hold it out of the flame so that the outermost level cools a little while the heat penetrates toward the center. (If you just kept the bead in the flame, the outer layer would go completely drippy on you while the heat was penetrating to the center -- that's why you need to do the heat & remove, heat & remove thing).

On encasing technique -- if you do the sideways swipe method (which is how I get my best results), don't marver or melt the ends (sides) down until you've made sure there are no air bubbles. Air bubbles will show up as lines between your swipes of glass. To get rid of them, begin heating the middle of the bead, gradually moving the heat out toward the ends. You'll see the molten glass chase the air bubbles out toward the ends. For this step, you want to do surface heating. Hold your bead under the flame so only the top layer of glass is in the flame. You don't want the base bead to heat up enough to melt up into the gaps.