PDA

View Full Version : walnut oil as solvent


Osteomark
01-04-2006, 02:47 PM
Has any done this with oil painting. They say it works and is not toxic. I use M.Graham oils that are walnut oil based so it should work. I'm wondering about using it with the linseed oil based paints such as Bob Ross paints. Will it act funny on the painting canvas?

I'd rather keep it non toxic in the world of oils. I guess palette knife is one answer. Just clean up with tissues.

Thanks,

Mark

turlogh
01-04-2006, 02:52 PM
Walnut oil and linseed oil both work as thinners. You can add it to paint to make it less viscous and you can clean your brushes with it (followed by soap and water).

Osteomark
01-04-2006, 03:26 PM
thanks Dave

David Brown
01-04-2006, 03:36 PM
I use M Graham as well and mix it with other linseed based paints without problems. You can also clean you brushes with cheap vegetable oil (from the grocery) but you must be sure to clean them with soap and water afterward.
D-

jefuchs
01-04-2006, 05:50 PM
I use M Graham as well and mix it with other linseed based paints without problems. You can also clean you brushes with cheap vegetable oil (from the grocery) but you must be sure to clean them with soap and water afterward.
D-

I've been cleaning my brushes with olive oil while painting, then a final cleaning with mineral spirits at the end of the day. I almost never clean my brushes with soap and water, as it's very time consuming, and i don't like the idea that I may want to return to work before the water has evaporated out.

antonio
01-04-2006, 06:19 PM
I've been cleaning my brushes with olive oil while painting, then a final cleaning with mineral spirits at the end of the day
Olive oil is great on pasta with fresh garlic and oregano; good for the heart and all that stuff. Keep it on your food and off your paintings. Use linseed oil instead; on the paintings that is.
Antonio

Baroque01
01-04-2006, 07:21 PM
I use walnut oil primarily to thin out my paint (like a solvent) and then clean up after I'm done painting with a bit of mineral spirits and soap & water. Works great.

jdadson
01-04-2006, 07:38 PM
I use M Graham as well and mix it with other linseed based paints without problems. You can also clean you brushes with cheap vegetable oil (from the grocery) but you must be sure to clean them with soap and water afterward.
D-

Different kinds of vegetable oil "from the grocery" behave very differently. Safflower oil (sold as Saffola in the US) is a drying oil. It makes no more sense to wash a brush in safflower oil than it would to wash it in walnut or linseed oil. You would be washing it in the very stuff that you are trying to wash out! Corn oil is a semi-drying oil. It will eventually get sticky, but it won't dry hard. Peanut oil is a non-drying oil. It will virtually never dry. I experimented with cleaning brushes in peanut oil. The experiment was a failure. Just a little bit of residual peanut oil in the brushes would ruin the paint film.

jdadson
01-04-2006, 07:43 PM
There's already been quite a bit posted about cleaning brushes. Nevertheless...

I've hit on a pretty good system. I bought a 32 oz. containter of liquid hand soap, with a pump, from an auto supply store - 16 bucks. I wash the brushes in that, then follow up with some after-shampoo hair conditioner from Walgreen's. It has some jojoba oil in it, but not enough to mess anything up.

An alternative is to use shampoo.

Both the shampoo and the hand soap leave the brushes "soft and manageable."

P.s. Be sure the hand soap isn't abrasive.

turlogh
01-04-2006, 07:54 PM
It makes no more sense to wash a brush in safflower oil than it would to wash it in walnut or linseed oil. You would be washing it in the very stuff that you are trying to wash out!
It is perfectly reasonable to use a drying oil to clean a brush, mainly because if you try it, it works. The oil is thinner than paint, and works very well for loosening the paint and allowing it to be wiped out of the brush. Enough pigment is removed that the the brush can be switched to another color without noticeable contamination. At the end of the day, oil can be used to wipe the pigment out of the brush, after which it is easy to use soap and water to remove the rest, along with the oil.

I would never use an oil other than linseed or walnut for cleaning brushes, because otherwise some small amount of non-drying oil (or, in the case of safflower or poppy, oil that I don't consider suitable for painting) would inevitably get into the paint film. They are good for cooking and on salad, not in paint.

jdadson
01-04-2006, 09:29 PM
It is perfectly reasonable to use a drying oil to clean a brush, mainly because if you try it, it works. The oil is thinner than paint, and works very well for loosening the paint and allowing it to be wiped out of the brush. Enough pigment is removed that the the brush can be switched to another color without noticeable contamination. At the end of the day, oil can be used to wipe the pigment out of the brush, after which it is easy to use soap and water to remove the rest, along with the oil.

On the rare occasions when I need to clean a brush and paint with it right away, I do "wash" it in drying oil. I assumed we were talking about cleaning a brush at the end of a session. I don't use the oil before the soap and water at the end of a session. I would figure that the oil would get up in the base under the ferrule. Then I'd be hard pressed to get it all washed out. Whatever works for you...

turlogh
01-04-2006, 10:02 PM
Whatever works for you...
Sorry if I misunderstood your point.

Johnnie
01-06-2006, 09:03 PM
I have read that using soap and water is not the thing to do with Bristle Brushes..

Anyone know why.???

Johnnie