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bluewindfisher
12-07-2005, 07:58 PM
I have been asked to do a WIP of a painting. This is a warts and all record of one of my paintings. I am writing the notes as I go. I am self taught and pretty much fly by the seat of my pants, so it will be interesting to see how this one turns out. In a broad sense, I guess I follow a similar path each time I paint, but I have never sat down and documented it before. This does not mean that I intend to follow this one like a recipe in the future. It is as it is. A one off glimpse of a process. I hope that it might be useful for others in some way.

This is my studio.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Studio_6031.JPG
Studio.
It is quite small, a corner of the lounge room.
Above the monitor is a colour wheel of all the colours I possess in tubes. Each colour has been mixed with white and also with black so that it is easy for me to select the tube closest to the colour I require. I also have colour charts that I have made with each colour mixed with its complimentary and other various colours. These devices are in preparation for my old timers disease. J
I use a portable Mabef easel, which can sit on the table or can be taken traveling and can stand on three legs.
The TV is often on in the background. Sometimes I play tapes of talking books while I work.

At the moment I am working mainly on small canvases 30 x 40cms. This enables me to travel with my wife in our little motor home and paint while she writes and sings. J
I have a grid already made up for the sized canvas I am using. This avoids having to draw one every time, and it avoids having to erase it from the canvas as the painting progresses.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Grid_on_Paper_6023.JPG
Grid on Paper.
The grid is done on paper and is cut narrower so that it can slip into the frame behind the canvas.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Inserting_Grid_6024.JPG
Inserting Grid.
The grid goes behind the canvas and I use a sheet of glass to hold the grid close to the back of it so that the grid shows through.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Inserting_Glass_6026.JPG
Inserting Glass.
Inserting glass into back of canvas.
It will stay in place within the frame on the back and force the grid hard up against the back of the canvas.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Grid_on_Canvas_6028.JPG
Grid on Canvas.
The grid shows faintly through canvas Ė enough to be able to use it to scale up the image.

Usually when I start I look through my album of photos to see what grabs me on that day. Then I copy that image to a work folder where I can crop it and manipulate it if necessary.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Source.jpg
Source.
This is an image of Stan who works on the farm where we live.

Once I have decided what orientation suits the image, either portrait or landscape, I then set the image outline in the same proportion as my canvas. In this case it is 3 x 4.

Then I play around with the image using Photoshop by magnifying it and moving it around within that frame, until I find the crop that I like.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Final_Crop.jpg
Final Crop.
What I like about this crop is the way that his left shoulder is higher than his right, creating some asymmetry in the composition. The light is from the front, which is something I donít usually paint. I prefer a side light which emphasizes the features of the face. I would also usually look for a more side on profile.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Grided.jpg
Grided.
Once I have decided on the crop that I like, I save the image, get the new size and create a grid on Photoshop which has 10 divisions across the largest dimension.

I am now ready to lightly sketch in the essentials onto the canvas. I use coloured pencils to do this so that I can start to get an idea of where the colours belong. In portraits, these essentials would include, the edges of the eyes, the shape of the mouth, and the placement of the nostrils together with a suggestion of the outline of the hair. Some idea of where the darks belong, folds in clothing etc. Some suggestion of the background to confirm that the composition is working.

At this stage I think the dominant colour will be orange and the blue denim will help contrast with it.

Here is the start of the sketch.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_1_6036.JPG
Sketch 1.
Normally, I would not have such dark lines, but I needed to darken them to show in the photo. The orange smudging is from an error I made. If necessary the pencil marks can be rubbed out with an eraser, but I have found that a squirt of Windex, rubbed off with a clean rag, does the job without the hassle of those bits of rubber, left over from the eraser, getting onto the painting.
Normally the smudges would not happen because the lines would be a lot softer. But they will disappear under the painting. Another reason for using colours close to what you expect the final colour to be.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_2_6038.JPG
Sketch 2.
Starting to outline the hair and eyebrows in blue pencil. And chin and ears in orange. Again, I donít normally work with this much pressure on the line. I hope it doesnít come back to bite me in the bum.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_3_6040.JPG
Sketch 3.
Starting on the mouth, cheeks and chin.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_4_6042.JPG
Sketch 4.
Then the outline of the teeth, clothes and neckline.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_5_6043.JPG
Sketch 5.
Some suggestion of the patterning on the shirt

This is about it I reckon. Normally this is where I would start using colours.
But if this was a really important commission I might create a layer in Photoshop so that I can check that I am close enough to the ref.
I will do this here for the sake of the exercise.

The original image and the image of the final sketch need to be resized so that when layered in Photoshop, they will match up exactly. The new layer may need to be moved slightly to align with the ref.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Resizing.jpg
Resizing and Comparing With Reference Image.
For example in this one, I can immediately see that the mouth is not quite right, the teeth are too big, the ear on our right is too far over.

Then the opacity of the layer with the sketch can be reduced so that the ref shines through. Or you can switch the layer on and off as you focus on one particular area.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Compare_Sketch_5.jpg
Compare Sketch Using Overlay.
Here I have created a third layer to highlight the areas that are not quite right. Normally I would not do this. It is fairly easy to see by eye, what is different.
The red lines show where the differences are greatest. The teeth are too big, the mouth is too big, the nose is too wide at his left nostril, the head is a little wide, needs to be narrowed on our right, and the neckline of the clothes on our right brought in a bit. The eyebrows can be bushier.
The eyes are about right and the left side of his head and the top of his head are close to correct.

If I was really concerned about accuracy, I suppose that I could have used a grid with more divisions. But I prefer to work larger and that keeps it a bit freer.

I could now go on to make corrections in the sketch, but I am going to make them as I start painting. I will correct them first, while the lines still show and it is easier for me to navigate around the comparison.

So at last!
Itís time to mix some paints.
We'll do that in Part Two.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-07-2005, 08:05 PM
Before posting this I checked that it would be OK to post 30 or so images at once. Unfortunately, the uploader won't allow me to post more than 15 at one time so I have broken this WIP up into parts.
The others are on their way. :)
Regards
Graham

P.Albert
12-07-2005, 08:19 PM
Graham, this is marvelous! How good of you to share your techniques!

I too like to use a photo editor to superimpose the drawing over the ref. image to check it, but I never would have thought of using the grid and glass like that, or highlighting the areas that are off. On my current wip, I've foregone this task as my camera is out of batteries. I can tell you that I've grown accustomed to it and it's a harder trying to catch it all on my own. Thanks for sharing!

bluewindfisher
12-07-2005, 08:40 PM
Part Two.
So at last!
Itís time to mix some paints.
I used to try to find the colour directly from the tube, but these days I have restricted my palette and tend to use more mixtures. I also create values and intensities from my essential colours before I start. This way I have a whole range of colours ready before putting brush to canvas. At the same time I mix a range of complimentary colours from the initial selection rather than using black. Wherever I can, I avoid using black, and when I do it is never straight from the tube. It is always mixed with the colour I am interested in darkening.

I am going to start with the three colours closest on my colour wheel to Cadmium Orange. Mainly Cadmium Orange, plus some Chrome Orange and Cadmium Yellow Deep. The blue opposite on my colour wheel is Coeruleum Blue.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Palette_1_6045.JPG
Palette 1.
I have created a range of values from black to white down the right hand side of my palette.
The warm colours have been placed at the top and their complimentaries on the bottom.
Then I have played around by mixing some of the colours.
I use Liquin to help the paints dry faster. This is particularly useful when traveling and it is difficult to transport wet paintings.

I usually start large, and start blocking in the large areas. But I am going to do the corrections first.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_6_6046.JPG
Sketch 6.
Eyebrows - easy to rough in where they are going.
Draw a new line for his left side of his head in orange.
Outline his left ear and down to the chin in orange.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_7_6047.JPG
Sketch 7.
Use blue to redefine line of clothing around chest and start suggestion of folds in clothing.

Palette 2.
Have added vermillion to the palette for the mouth area.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_8_6049.JPG
Sketch 8.
Correcting the teeth by filling the negative space around them, using a warm neutral colour. Vermillion toned down for that.
I have started to suggest some of the darker areas in the mouth here.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_9_6050.JPG
Sketch 9.
Now for the nose.
And the area around the eyes and the cheeks.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_10_6051.JPG
Sketch 9.
Now for the nose.
And the area around the eyes and the cheeks.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_11_6052.JPG
Sketch 11.
Starting to think now about the background. The face is orange, need some kind of blue to throw it forward.
Pulling colours off the palette.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_12_6053.JPG
Sketch 12.
Toying with the idea of whether or not to acknowledge that a flash has just gone off in his face, projecting his shadow on the wall behind him.
Work on background.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_13_6054.JPG
Sketch 13.
Time to get the dominant colour for the shirt in there.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_14_6055.JPG
Sketch 14.
And then using the brushes all over the painting, in the shirt, on the background, in the shadows, start to build the harmony.


Before we get too far down the track letís compare those essential points again.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Compare_Sketch_14.jpg
Compare Sketch 14.
Getting pretty close now. Somehow I overcorrected on his left side of his face, but that is easy to correct.
Can now home in on the finer details of the eyes.
The centre tooth needs a small widening to our right.
Some correction to the eyelids will bring the eyes closer to the ref.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Compare_Mouth_Sketch_14.jpg
Compare Mouth in Sketch 14.
Here it is easy to see what fine adjustments can be made to the teeth. There are also still some of the original corrections around the lower lip still to complete. I wanted to make sure the teeth were right first. The lips will come with modeling the face.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Compare_Eyes_Sketch_14.jpg
Compare Eyes in Sketch 14.
The eyes are usually the most important thing to get right, and one advantage of using software like Photoshop is that you can explode the view and see the finer points.
At this point I will just try to get the larger points correct. Final shading will come towards the end.
I have seen some WIPs where the artist may start with the eyes and complete them to an astonishing degree and then build the face around them. I prefer to work on all parts of the painting at the same time. Gradually building it up as a whole. This also enables me to go in a different direction if I wish to. If one part is completed then the finish is pretty much determined.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_15_6058.JPG
Sketch 15.
While the background is wet I have blended the colours a little more in the background, around the head and on the edges of the clothing.

Still not sure of what the final painting will be like. Will get a better idea of that once most of the corrections are in place and the modeling on the face is started.

I am leaving this now as it is late afternoon and I canít take any more photos. I usually work during the day anyway.
At this point I usually paint around the edges of the canvas while cleaning the brushes and using colours from the palette. This way I can offer the canvas unframed, and the client can frame it according to their taste if they want to do that.
Have placed clingwrap over my palette to slow down any drying of the paints overnight.

This is the end of Part Two.
The Final Part is on its way.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-07-2005, 09:14 PM
Here is Part Three - The Final Stage.

Next Day.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_16_6059.JPG
Sketch 16.
Fixing the width of the head and his left ear. Just suggestions of light and shade at the moment.
Similar treatment for his right ear.
And some touches of pink on the ears and face.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_17_6060.JPG
Sketch 17.
Light touches around the head. Trying to feel the contour, leaving the obvious highlights.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_18_6061.JPG
Sketch 18.
I need to tidy up the area around the mouth and teeth before I go much further.
Mixed up the tooth colour from Chrome Orange, Cad Yellow and Coeruleum Blue.
Top teeth are close to right shape now I think.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_19_6062.JPG
Sketch 19.
Now bottom teeth.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_20_6063.JPG
Sketch 20.
And bottom lip, and the edges of his mouth.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_21_6064.JPG
Sketch 21.
Now the eyes need to be positioned correctly.
Left eye.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_22_6065.JPG
Sketch 22.
Right eye and eyelids.

Oh! Hi Stan!
The man I know is starting to emerge from the surface.


That nose could do with a bit of work now couldnít it?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_23_6066.JPG
Sketch 23.
Some work on the nose and the rest of the face at the same time. Building up the dark areas and merging into the lighter areas.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_24_6067.JPG
Sketch 24.
Working in the neck and all over the face. Using blues, reds, oranges and not blending them in together. Working lightly over the wet paint, being careful not to over work the area. I keep moving all over using similar colours in varying proportions all over the painting. If there is a dark line underneath that I need to get rid of and it shows through the upper layers, I add a little white, which is opaque. Sometimes I can then paint the new colour over it. Other times I might have to wait for it to dry.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_25_6068.JPG
Sketch 25.
Time to bring out the small brush for the small darks and highlights.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_26_6069.JPG
Sketch 26.
Now for the hair.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_27_6070.JPG
Sketch 27.
And the eyebrows.
Add some values to the shirt so that it recedes a bit.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2005/70598-Sketch_27_6070_Darkened.jpg
Sketch 27 Darkened Background.
At this point I was wondering about the background, so I manipulated the last image in Photoshop to create a dark background. I think it works quite well.
This photo is a bit darker than the painting because it is again late afternoon.
There is still some fine tuning to do but I am now going to sit on it for a while. Leave it in the studio and let it settle in my subconscious.

I still have to Ė
Decide about the final background.
Add some dark bits in the eyebrows.
Add some fine details in the eyes.
Darken the back teeth.

But it is close to finished.
What do you think?

I have a quote sitting on the front of my monitor.

"Use what talents you have,
for the forest would be very
quiet if no birds sang except
those that sing the best."

Flying by the seat of your pants may not be the most elegant way to go, but I think the important thing is to have a go. :)

Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-07-2005, 09:18 PM
Dana has said that this post will be left here for a little while, then it will probably be moved to the Classroom Forum.
Regards
Graham

eileenclaire
12-07-2005, 10:59 PM
What do you think?



Wow! This is an outstanding work in progress! Fantastic explanations and step by step images!

Thank you so much for doing this, Graham!

That grid behind the canvas idea is sheer genius :) . I never thought to do something like that.

I feel as though I am in your studio, watching over your shoulder. :wave:

bluewindfisher
12-07-2005, 11:17 PM
Wow! This is an outstanding work in progress! Fantastic explanations and step by step images!
Thank you so much for doing this, Graham!
That grid behind the canvas idea is sheer genius :) . I never thought to do something like that.
I feel as though I am in your studio, watching over your shoulder. :wave:

Thanks Eileen.
Initially I tried to set up a light behind the canvas, but it was too much fidling. The glass works because it presses the grid agains the canvas and that is enough. Don't know what I will do when I start painting large canvases again! :)
I know that some people project gids onto their canvases, but I don't think I have enough room for that here. Besides this method is portable.
Regards
Graham

alfredart
12-08-2005, 03:15 AM
Graham this is fantastic. What a WIP!!!! Thanks so for sharing... this is now bookmarked and I rated it a five star thread for sure. There's alot that can be learned here.

Wonderful job my friend.

Thanks,
AL

valchina612
12-08-2005, 03:49 AM
Graham, this is truly amazing. I have enjoyed the entire Tutorial immensely, and agree with Al that it is getting a 5 start rating from me also. I just love your work. And the glass to hold the grid in place behind the canvas is one of the best tips ever. Thankyou so much Graham. :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Val. :wave:

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 04:05 AM
Graham this is fantastic. What a WIP!!!! Thanks so for sharing... this is now bookmarked and I rated it a five star thread for sure. There's alot that can be learned here.
Wonderful job my friend.
Thanks,
AL

Thanks very much Al. I hope it is helpful in some way. I look forward to seeing your new work. :)
I have never done anything like this before and it has been a very interesting exercise.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 04:08 AM
Graham, this is truly amazing. I have enjoyed the entire Tutorial immensely, and agree with Al that it is getting a 5 start rating from me also. I just love your work. And the glass to hold the grid in place behind the canvas is one of the best tips ever. Thankyou so much Graham. :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Val. :wave:

Five star Val? Does that mean I have to start providing meals now. LOL. :)
Thank you for your comments. I have received so much value from these Forums, it would be nice to think that perhaps I have made some contribution in return.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 04:16 AM
Graham, this is marvelous! How good of you to share your techniques!

I too like to use a photo editor to superimpose the drawing over the ref. image to check it, but I never would have thought of using the grid and glass like that, or highlighting the areas that are off. On my current wip, I've foregone this task as my camera is out of batteries. I can tell you that I've grown accustomed to it and it's a harder trying to catch it all on my own. Thanks for sharing!

Thank you for your comments.
I hate to admit it but I think I would be lost without my digital camera. It has opened up my work enormously. I now have over 6000 images so I suppose that as long as I didn't lose those, I would have something to work on for a while. :)
Regards
Graham

Mark_xiii
12-08-2005, 05:26 AM
Wow! Great thread Graham, thanks! It's always good to see how other people work. I really should get to grips with photoshop, it's useful being able to lay a sketch over an original to check your details... Another 5* from me.

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 06:47 AM
Wow! Great thread Graham, thanks! It's always good to see how other people work. I really should get to grips with photoshop, it's useful being able to lay a sketch over an original to check your details... Another 5* from me.

Thanks very much Mark. Glad you liked it. :)
Yes it is useful to be able to put a layer over the reference image. And its not like you are enslaved by it because you are still able to choose the direction you are going to take with it.
Regards
Graham

jhercilia
12-08-2005, 07:37 AM
awesome progression, Grahams. Awesome painting.

osyang
12-08-2005, 08:12 AM
Hi G!
wonderful tutorial, very good tips and techniques!
I have some questions: when checking the image in Photoshop, how do you prevent the distortions caused by the camera? I am considering using a projector for the transfer to the canvas. Is it any good?
Greetings,
O.

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 08:50 AM
awesome progression, Grahams. Awesome painting.

Thanks for your comments Janet.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 09:22 AM
Hi G!
wonderful tutorial, very good tips and techniques!
I have some questions: when checking the image in Photoshop, how do you prevent the distortions caused by the camera? I am considering using a projector for the transfer to the canvas. Is it any good?
Greetings,
O.

Hi Osmar
I guess the ideal situation would be to have a setup where the camera and the canvas was in the same position every time. In that way, whatever distorions there are, would be the same each time. This could be done by setting up a spot reserved for this purpose alone.
I do it by hand however. When taking the shot, I try to get the edges of the canvas at right angles to the edges of my view finder. Because the view finder is so small it is difficult to do this accurately and when I get to see the image on my monitor I often find that the top or bottom is not at right angles. These iamges can't really be used and you need to take another one if you are wanting to overlay it for fine detail differences. I sometimes use a tripod which helps in get a good clear shot.

If the image is square but tilted, of course you can correct that in Photoshop by rotating a degree or two.

The scaling of the new image so that it fits exactly over the original is another problem. The photo you are working from might be a very different size to that of the photo of the painting. If you have a good sqare image to work from, sometimes it is enough to simply make them the same size in photoshop, copy the image and paste it into the original, creating a new layer. But sometimes they don't match exactly and the resizing may need to be tweeked by a few percent.

Since doing the tutorial, I have thought that if I was going to do this consistently, it would probably help to have two or three crosses marked on the canvas which you don't delete until the last stages of your painting. Then you would be able to easily tell when the images are matching up. Of course this is what printers have been doing for decades when needing to make three runs to print something in colour.

The way that I have been doing it is to have the original on the screen, reduced so that all of the image is shown - no vertical or horizontal sliders.
Then I place the new image window over that one and resize the edges so that the two match exactly. Reduce the scale on the new image so that it is smaller than the frames and gradually increase (or decreae) its size until it fits the frame without producing any slider bars. When you have achieved this, both images should overlay exactly. Save the new sizing, copy the image and past it into the original. In Photoshop you can tweak the magnification by small increments, so it is possible to get it exact.

I hope this has not been an over complicated answer to a simple question. :)
Please dont hesitate to follow up if I have not answered your question.
Regards
Graham

maria_khurram
12-08-2005, 09:22 AM
Fantastic!

Thanks Graham for sharing your WIP and your technique.

5 stars and a Merit point from me...:wave:

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 09:28 AM
Fantastic!
Thanks Graham for sharing your WIP and your technique.
5 stars and a Merit point from me...:wave:
Thanks Maria.
These five stars are blowing me out a bit. :) Actually I expected people to be responding with comments like, "No wonder your paintingas are crap! Why don't you take some time to learn how to do it properly." LOL.
The important thing is that someone might get some value out of it, even if it is an idea of what to avoid.
I appreciate your feedback, and the merit point too of course! :)
Regards
Graham

osyang
12-08-2005, 10:03 AM
Hi G.
thank you for taking the time to answer my "simple" question! As I suspected, it is not so simple at all to have the necessary accuracy! I can never get a picture at right angles, it is always tilted. And the lens itself usually introduces some barrel distortion. I suspect this hi-tech is not for me...LOL
Greetings,
O.

Dana Design
12-08-2005, 12:45 PM
Graham, thank you SO much for this WIP! It's so interesting to me as a portraitist to see how others work. I've just recently evolved into painting in blocks of color rather than over blending and while this wasn't a purposeful decision, I'm happy with this style. Perhaps tomorrow? Something different, who knows.

Wonderful WIP! And, yes, I added my 5 stars!

juli
12-08-2005, 07:03 PM
Thanks Graham for sharing this. I love watching the way others approach their art, and have always loved the animation and spirit you put into all your paintings. You can always feel the person in the painting.
Great work.

Juli
(a fellow aussie - even if it is the other side and end of the country!!)

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 07:26 PM
Graham, thank you SO much for this WIP! It's so interesting to me as a portraitist to see how others work. I've just recently evolved into painting in blocks of color rather than over blending and while this wasn't a purposeful decision, I'm happy with this style. Perhaps tomorrow? Something different, who knows.
Wonderful WIP! And, yes, I added my 5 stars!

Oh you are welcome Dana. :) And thank you for encouraging me to do it. :)
It's not something I would have thought of doing, because I think of myself as a beginner and especially because I do fly by the seat of my pants.

Could you clear something up for me please? What is the meaning of your signature "Aut tace aut loquere meliora silentio." I guess it has something to do with loquacity and silence, but I am intrigued.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 07:36 PM
Thanks Graham for sharing this. I love watching the way others approach their art, and have always loved the animation and spirit you put into all your paintings. You can always feel the person in the painting.
Great work.

Juli
(a fellow aussie - even if it is the other side and end of the country!!)

Hi Juli, nice to meecha! Having a bit of a heat wave over there? We are still waiting for summer over here. :)
I really appreciate your comments about the animation and spirit in my paintings. I take that as the highest compliment. If people are getting that, then I think they are working. I guess I am only painting people I care about in some way, or have been moved by them in some way and it is great to know that they are being seen as real people. I am reminded of the story of the disciple who wanted to paint and he kept taking his painting of a pig lying down to his Master for comment. The master would say "That's a dead pig", and the disciple would go away and try again. This went on and on for a long time and the Master kept responding with "That's a dead pig". Until one day the Master said "That's a pig". Your comments give me encouragement that I am not painting dead pigs. LOL :)
Regards
Graham

Dana Design
12-08-2005, 08:14 PM
Could you clear something up for me please? What is the meaning of your signature "Aut tace aut loquere meliora silentio." I guess it has something to do with loquacity and silence, but I am intrigued.
Regards
Graham

In Latin which I learned in grade school (from the nuns) and again in high school and university it means "Be quiet, unless your words be better than silence" to put it simply.

Unfortunately for all students, Latin is no longer taught with the exception of, perhaps, private schools.

bluewindfisher
12-08-2005, 08:22 PM
In Latin which I learned in grade school (from the nuns) and again in high school and university it means "Be quiet, unless your words be better than silence" to put it simply.

Unfortunately for all students, Latin is no longer taught with the exception of, perhaps, private schools.

Oh yes I like it! My personal motto is "If you can't further the action, say nothing." LOL.
I never did latin at school. I admire people who have more than one language.
Regards
Graham

Dana Design
12-08-2005, 08:25 PM
Oh yes I like it! My personal motto is "If you can't further the action, say nothing." LOL.
I never did latin at school. I admire people who have more than one language.
Regards
Graham

Unfortunately, or rather fortunately perhaps, it wasn't a choice for me. It was a required language. UNfortunately, no one speak it today! :o

juli
12-09-2005, 02:05 AM
Hi Juli, nice to meecha! Having a bit of a heat wave over there? We are still waiting for summer over here.

You are more than welcome to some of ours!!
I am having to learn to combine the sweat with the paint!!!!! It is so hot.
I am a Victorian born and can't help thinking - if only it rained - then I remember that rain only increases the humidity here. Best to just shut up and live with it I guess.

Looking forward to more of your painting

Juli

LGHumphrey
12-09-2005, 06:59 PM
Great demo Graham and a lovely piece of work. The saying you have hanging up at your computer reminds me of Edmund Burke's "Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little."

bluewindfisher
12-09-2005, 10:51 PM
Great demo Graham and a lovely piece of work. The saying you have hanging up at your computer reminds me of Edmund Burke's "Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little."

Thanks for you comments Lawrence. And there's "If I wait until I'm perfect, I'll get nothing done." :)
Regards
Graham

Mystfy
12-10-2005, 03:16 AM
Very good step by step. Do you blend, or just layer over layer, I notice that some painters on here do and others dont. Im new to painting and struggle with the hard lines, wondering if I should leave them or blend them???? and if I blend them, how :eek:

I look forward to seeing more of your wip. I learnt a bit from this one. Its also great to watch how other artists work.

Blessings
Char

mauricar
12-11-2005, 08:38 AM
This tutorial is one of the best I have seen. I am going to rate it as a 5 star. You did a wonderful job. While I do not work in oil, I can still use the techniques in pastel, acrylic, and CP. Thanks so much. I like the way you work in a small space, as I do also.

jhercilia
12-11-2005, 12:24 PM
This tutorial is one of the best I have seen. I am going to rate it as a 5 star. . .
I agree with you. This deserves 5 stars. So, I am voting too.

bluewindfisher
12-11-2005, 08:16 PM
Very good step by step. Do you blend, or just layer over layer, I notice that some painters on here do and others dont. Im new to painting and struggle with the hard lines, wondering if I should leave them or blend them???? and if I blend them, how :eek:
I look forward to seeing more of your wip. I learnt a bit from this one. Its also great to watch how other artists work.
Blessings
Char

Char I suppose I do a bit of both, blending and layering. I don't really have a technique that I stick to. I just try stuff until I get something that is working for me at the time.
I am not sure I know what you mean about hard lines. If you mean the initial sketch, I work with light lines, just enough for me to be able to locate where I am when I start painting. If you mean boundaries between tones, then I guess it differs depending on what the subject is and how far back in the picture it is. The further back it is the more blurred the edges would be for example.
I have had a quick look at some of your work posted here and can't see any examples of the problems you are mentioning. If I have missed the point please feel free to post an example and perhaps we could make some comments on it.
Regards
Graham

bluewindfisher
12-11-2005, 08:24 PM
This tutorial is one of the best I have seen. I am going to rate it as a 5 star. You did a wonderful job. While I do not work in oil, I can still use the techniques in pastel, acrylic, and CP. Thanks so much. I like the way you work in a small space, as I do also.

Thank you so much Midge.
I wasn't sure how it would be received and worried that perhaps I put a bit too much detail into it. I guess I did it the way that I would have liked to see it. In the end I am glad that it has been useful. :)
It took me two hours to upload and I was panicing that it would bomb out half way and I would have this senseless start to a WIP stuck up there. LOL.
The small space is a fairly new thing. I used to work in an old church and had as much room to spread out as I wanted. Now is very different in our new space and also with my gearing up to working from a bus as we travel around.
Regards
Graham

Terry Wynn
01-03-2006, 01:05 PM
Hi, Graham,

I don't post often but read through your tutorial. I really like your style - your subjects have such life - I can hear this man's jolly breathing!

Thank you so much for your time and efforts in doing this. :clap: :clap: :clap: Very time consuming for you, I am sure, but certainly great for those of us following it.

I will definitely rate this and I'm sure, refer to it many times.

Oh, and I really like the saying posted near your monitor.

Terry

bluewindfisher
01-04-2006, 09:22 PM
Thanks for your comments Terry. I am glad that you found the tutorial useful. :)
Regards
Graham

Hi, Graham,
I don't post often but read through your tutorial. I really like your style - your subjects have such life - I can hear this man's jolly breathing!
Thank you so much for your time and efforts in doing this. :clap: :clap: :clap: Very time consuming for you, I am sure, but certainly great for those of us following it.
I will definitely rate this and I'm sure, refer to it many times.
Oh, and I really like the saying posted near your monitor.
Terry