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Chiers
12-02-2005, 04:57 AM
This thread is for reviews of graphics tablets. So often new digital art members ask about tablets and what kind to buy. Since the most valuable advice comes from those who use a product tell us what kind of tablet you use? Why do you like, or not like it? Would you recommend it?
Please limit comments to pertinent information.

Chiers
12-02-2005, 05:04 AM
Wacom Comparisons (http://www.videobytes.com.au/product...aretablets.asp)

jhercilia
12-02-2005, 06:19 PM
I currently own a Graphire3 4x5, an Intuous2 6x8, an Intuous3 9x12, and the Cintiq 21UX.
Why? Well, I started using the Intuous2. I was very pleased with it. But then, Wacom introduced its Intuous3, which I bought because of its higher levels of pressure sensitivity (1,024 compared to 512 of the Intuous2), and higher lines per inch resolution: 5,080, and also because I wanted a bigger tablet to fit my style. I find bigger tablets more confortable for me. Then, I bought the Graphire3 for my laptop. I am not impressed with this one. I find its response is slow and sometimes I have to click several times to execute what I want. It doesn’t matter how I tweak the settings, it still behaves the same. Maybe I got a defective tablet. Who knows. I found it too small for me. Luckily, the new Graphire4 has many improvements worth the try. The only thing with the Graphire4 is its lower levels of pressure sensitivity compared with the Intuous3.

Last, I bought the Cintiq 21UX, which is the best of both worlds but at a much higher price since it’s also a monitor. I use this Cintiq as well as the Intuous3 on the same computer since I am running 2 monitors. And yes, I’m still using my old Intuous2 on a second computer.

But for my paintings, I prefer the highest levels of pressure sensitivity I can get in a tablet. It does make a difference. I have heard of people saying that it doesn’t matter but that really depends on the type of work you do. For me, it does matter. I can tell the difference between the two since I work also with very detailed work as well as more loose work.

Below, are some helpful links regarding Wacom tablets/interactive pen display/tablet pc:

http://www.wacom.com/productinfo/index.cfm - Wacom products review
http://www.videobytes.com.au/products/index.asp - additional info

Enjoy :p

StephenEC
12-02-2005, 11:25 PM
Hello Sherry,

I'm,new here,and I found this wonderful place through a link from another site.
I have a Intuos3 9x12, I am fairly new to the computer art community,and the main reason I purchased the tablet was for doing editing of photos
that I take with my D70.
I ended up buying the 9x12 because , it's big enough to set in my lap, and with the mapping functions I have used,I can either use small finger movements to cover the screens (two monitors ) with ease , or I can use larger wrist and forearm movements...I really like the sensitivity of this tablet,
I have since started to try my hand at creating digital art from my mind.
I recoomend a tablet for it's ease of use , it speeds up my time doing
the editing and finishing of photos . . . as for size... that's a total personal
choice.

Stephen

Smokin
12-03-2005, 12:15 AM
The common considerations when getting a tablet are usually performance, cost, and size.

There has always been the question of what brand to get and whats the difference in quality between these brands. Based on my researchh on this there is a complete agreement that Wacom tablets are the way to go. They have a great design and are considered the formost experts on building tablets. Thats not to say another brand wont be good or worth it, just that if you buy a wacom, you can be confident that you wont find anything better or more advanced (not including various model designs that wacom makes). I have no personal experience with other brand tablets except for at the tech store and a few reviews I've read. The feel of some brands felt awkward in some instances and an overal, not as good of a feel as Wacom tablets and pens. Reviews arnt bad for various brands, but the reviews I've read usually aknowlage that Wacoms are still the better brand, but if cost is a factor and wacoms are too expensive, then there are still solid options available.

The cost of tablets range from 50-3000 depending on what you get. Wacoms sport I believe 3 diffent models, (cheap, moderate, expensive, Janet has a wonderful indepth explanation on the differences of each model), graphire,Inuous, and Cintiuq. I only have personal experience with the intuous Model, wich are priced from 200-500 depending on size. I love my tablet andcant say anything bad about its design or performance. My research on graphires (a consideration I had) was that the difference in performance, or sensativity) while noticable, was not too different. IMO, if one is looking to digitally paint, an Intuous is the way to go. If one is looking to do more web graphic, vector art and simple photo manipulations, then the graphire is prob more than capable enough to meet your needs at a cheaper cost. If one can afford the cintiw , a SWEET looking toy, then post more about what you think about it, cause Im dreaming of getting one :P

The size of tablet to use is all about preference and how one likes to draw IMO. The cost of a tablet sometimes decides the size of the tablet for us, but for thoose who still cant decide i suggest really asking yourself how you like to draw. IMO, one who likes to draw from the elbow will like the larger sized tablet and might become frustrated at the smaller sized tablets available. Those who like to draw from the wrist, who might not have enough desktop space (I slap my 9x12 on lap though) might get a lil annoyed at the larger sized tablets.

Additional considerations for those buying a new tablet. Wacom, while more expensive, also include a software bundle perfect for thos new to digital art. They also have a solid warrentee and good costumer service (I once freaked cause it didnt work, and got an email the next day explaining what i needed to do to fix the issue i had, took me all but 2 mins to get my tablet back in perfect working condition).

My 2 cents.

Jin
12-04-2005, 05:32 PM
Here's some information that may help anyone deciding which tablet to buy (I'll add my own review below this info):

On the Wacom site we can run through some questions to find the best choice of model and size. In addition to reading this thread and threads in other forums to learn from users what their personal experience has been with various tablet brands and Wacom's fine tablets, it can be a help in making the best decision.

Wacom's Tablet Wizard (http://www.wacom.com/tabletwizard/index.cfm)

For anyone on a budget, Wacom also sells refurbished tablets. As I type this post Wacom says these tablets are top quality used tablets that have been reconditioned, cleaned, inspected, and repackaged. They come with a one year warranty and all of the bundled software that comes with their new and more expensive tablets.

Though there are sometimes refurbished tablets that use Serial connections, for newer computers it's probably best to buy one with a USB connection.

To check the list of refurbs (it changes frequently so be sure to check back often):

WacomDirect - Refurbished Tablets (http://wacomdirect.wacom.com/wacomdirect/reftablet.asp?)

My own experience with Wacom tablets has been great. My first tablet, an ArtZ II purchased in the mid-'90s, is still working and I used it daily for 8 or 9 years.

To be more up to date with what other Painter artists were using since I teach and answer Painter questions daily, a couple of years ago I purchased an Intuos 2 - 9 x 12 inch tablet. After setting it up, I found that the entire tablet took up too much room on my desk to allow me to comfortably arrange both my keyboard and tablet so I could use both without having to move anything. I returned the 9 x 12 inch tablet in exchange for my Intuos 6 x 8 inch tablet and have been very happy with the choice.

For anyone new to Wacom tablets, the numbers mentioned in the above paragraph refer only to the working area of the tablet, 9 x 12 inches or 6 x 8 inches. I don't recall the entire footprint dimensions of the 9 x 12 inch tablet but to give you some idea of the size ratio, my whole Intuos 2 - 6 x 8 inch tablet actually takes up 13 x 10 inches of space on my desk.

Wacom's tech support is not only free, the tech support folks are friendly and helpful. In my book, it's the best company to deal with and they make the best products.

Chiers
12-07-2005, 10:19 PM
Good information here (http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/aboutgraphics/a/graphicstablets.htm)

AndieW
03-14-2006, 06:09 AM
Hi All.

I use the Wacom intuous 3 A5 size. I chose the tablet due to a good review in the new digital art mag 'Imagine FX' and I chose the size for two reasons: The first was I wanted to use it with a laptop PC and secondly I didn't want to spend too much money as it is my first tablet and I didn't want to have wasted too much cash if I didn't get on with it !!

When it arrived I was a bit concerned that it might be a bit on the small side but I neednt have worried, I find I am always zooming in for detailed work anyway and have found no problems with the resolution. An added bonus is that it actually fits in the side pocket of my laptop case.

Overall I give this tablet a big thumbs up. I love using it and am now comletely hooked and no one can prise it out of my hands! It feels good to work with ( have yet to try different pen tips ) and the pressure sensitivity is very smooth. It installed and worked first time out of the box ( Windows XP ) and has a flexible driver allowing the programming of the function keys and sliders.

I cannot obviously comment on this pad compared to others as this is my first and it is still fairly new and I haven't dropped it - yet - he said touching wood! - so I cannot comment on durability but it does seem to be very well made.

As a matter of interest the tablet came with a copy of Corel Painter Essentials ( the cut down version of the big daddy app ) I personally use Artrage 2 and I have also tried it in Paint Shop pro and The GIMP and found it works well in all of them. ( There used to be a problem with the Windows version of the GIMP and tablets but this appears to have been cured with the latest version )

Overall I would recommend it.

Andie

beautifulfreak
03-14-2006, 09:20 AM
Since this older thread has been brought to the top, I'd like to share a surprisingly good experience I had with Wacom. I own an old Artz II tablet and my driver corrupted during a power outage that powered off my computer. The disk I had saved my driver on had gotten ruined so I downloaded the latest drivers for my os from the wacom website. Once installed it wouldn't work with my serial to usb adapter. I tried everything even had a nice guy from Eygpt send me some older drivers he had. So on a long shot I emailed Wacom support, I figured there would be no way they would want to help me with my 10 year old tablet. To my surprise I received an email asking for more info. I provided and we emailed back and forth(somerime 2 or 3 emails in a day) for about 4 days of problem solving trying one thing or another til I got a driver to work for my tablet. I was pleasantly surprised, in this day in age it is hard to get manufacturers to support their products at all and Wacom came through for me. Thank You Wacom.

Btw my original Wacom is a 12 x 12, I like it but recently i got a 6 x 8 Artz II off of ebay and like it too, I think the perfect size for me might be somewhere inbetween, maybe the 9 x 12.

fugitive
03-26-2006, 12:16 PM
Here's some information that may help anyone deciding which tablet to buy (I'll add my own review below this info):

On the Wacom site we can run through some questions to find the best choice of model and size. In addition to reading this thread and threads in other forums to learn from users what their personal experience has been with various tablet brands and Wacom's fine tablets, it can be a help in making the best decision.

Wacom's Tablet Wizard (http://www.wacom.com/tabletwizard/index.cfm)

For anyone on a budget, Wacom also sells refurbished tablets. As I type this post Wacom says these tablets are top quality used tablets that have been reconditioned, cleaned, inspected, and repackaged. They come with a one year warranty and all of the bundled software that comes with their new and more expensive tablets.

Though there are sometimes refurbished tablets that use Serial connections, for newer computers it's probably best to buy one with a USB connection.

To check the list of refurbs (it changes frequently so be sure to check back often):

WacomDirect - Refurbished Tablets (http://wacomdirect.wacom.com/wacomdirect/reftablet.asp?)

My own experience with Wacom tablets has been great. My first tablet, an ArtZ II purchased in the mid-'90s, is still working and I used it daily for 8 or 9 years.

To be more up to date with what other Painter artists were using since I teach and answer Painter questions daily, a couple of years ago I purchased an Intuos 2 - 9 x 12 inch tablet. After setting it up, I found that the entire tablet took up too much room on my desk to allow me to comfortably arrange both my keyboard and tablet so I could use both without having to move anything. I returned the 9 x 12 inch tablet in exchange for my Intuos 6 x 8 inch tablet and have been very happy with the choice.

For anyone new to Wacom tablets, the numbers mentioned in the above paragraph refer only to the working area of the tablet, 9 x 12 inches or 6 x 8 inches. I don't recall the entire footprint dimensions of the 9 x 12 inch tablet but to give you some idea of the size ratio, my whole Intuos 2 - 6 x 8 inch tablet actually takes up 13 x 10 inches of space on my desk.

Wacom's tech support is not only free, the tech support folks are friendly and helpful. In my book, it's the best company to deal with and they make the best products.
Just read this for 1st time. I am using a used Artz II I bought on ebay, like new, and I love it. Frankly, I don't see any diff between mine at 512 I think, and the Graphire I had at 1000. I just don't think the hand needs a lot of infinit, touches. I like the tilt, Thats why I got it, but doesn't seem to do much compared to a real brush, but I use the soft and medium touchstrip thingys. New proggie called Twisted Brush. I actually get to converse with the owner about changes to his baby, as it's pretty new, but reeally has some WOW brushes, 1500 of them. Well, that's all so long. greg

Elvira
04-30-2006, 10:49 AM
I got my new Intous 3 about a month ago. I chose the 6 X 11 format because I use two monitors and want the the image ratio to be constant as I found with my old small one it was difficult to maintain when I remaped to the two monitors, I had to leave part of it out which meant switching between pen and mouse.

I realy like the new tablet, it came with three pen nibs, the standard (has a spare), the stroke nib (has a little spring in it), and the felt tip, I haven't used the felt tip but love the stoke tip it has nice soft feel to it.

The footprint of my tablet is about the same as a keyboard with a wrist rest.

I really like my new tablet!!!!:)

Edie

jimbobwu
06-09-2006, 12:28 AM
I recently bought an ArtZ II tablet off eBay and I was very happy with it (especially since it was a birthday present and my parents were paying for it) but then my mother advised me to return it for a newer model instead since if there was anything wrong with it, customer support would probably be able to help with it more efficiently than with an 8-year old tablet. I was very impressed with the ArtZ II 12x12 however. I'm hoping the Intuos will have as many features.

writerhoward
06-14-2006, 02:50 PM
I use a Wacom Graphire 3 (6x8) and am quite happy with it.

Howard

LilSerenity
06-14-2006, 06:58 PM
I presently own a Wacom Intuos 3 4x5 (A6), because at the time that was all I could afford. I do plan on getting a larger tablet in time but for now the A6 suffices very well if I keep it mapped to just one of my 2001FP (20" 1600x1200 LCD) screens.

Hopefully in the next year or two I will go for the Intuos 3 6x8 as I don't need anything larger with the displays I have.

I wouldn't use anything other than the Intuos though, super sensitive and accurate tablet, it's an art tool rather than a computer peripheral in my book.

Vicky

Lynnzieartsy
07-09-2006, 04:05 PM
I also own a Wacom Intuos 3 4x5 (A6), and I love it. I don't find the size at all too small. I zoom into areas to work and it does great detail and sensativity.

IrishRose
09-14-2006, 09:24 PM
It's a really great tablet and all Wacom products are super...

bluemoonstar
10-26-2006, 12:07 AM
Wacom tablet user here, too! Intuitos 2, been using it daily for 3 1/2 years, problem free. I love it. I started with a cheap brand, because I wasn't sure about using a tablet, but it was quite awkward compared to the Wacom. The pen had batteries, and it quickly broke. So they replaced it, but I ordered the Wacom in the meanwhile & it was worth every penny. Great customer service, too.

Rose Queen
10-30-2006, 03:54 PM
Here's a link to a Cintq tablet review: http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/001467.php



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gaston
10-30-2006, 06:57 PM
I buy Genius Pensketch 9x12 Professional Graphic Design User USB Tablet ,known somebody more about this tablet. This is the first time that i buy a tablet. I will it used with painter and paintshop X.

Thanks
gaston

Young Cutthroat
12-26-2006, 10:56 AM
So for a beginner, I take it that the best kind would be a 6x8? If youre on a budget, but want to get a good one, what would be a good kind to get?

FriendCarol
12-26-2006, 12:40 PM
I've seen some Intuos (Wacom) 6"x8" tablets on Ebay; the serial interface type looks particularly cheap. Once in awhile I bid on one, and hope to succeed at buying one soon. :D

Elvira
12-26-2006, 08:38 PM
For the limited budget there is nothing wrong with a Graphir if you can't afford an Intous. And for many of us we started with the smaller one and found it no real handicap even though I now have a 6 X 11 for my dual monitors, I was very happy with my earlier 4 X 5 Graphir and then an Intous GD when I was able to move up I gave my old ones to others and they are still enjoying them.

It seems you can't loose with Wacom they make great Tablets!
Edie

FriendCarol
12-27-2006, 12:18 PM
Current link for refurbished Wacom (direct): http://direct.wacom.com/stores/2/Refurbished_Tablets_C35.cfm?gclid=CNm2rOqFs4kCFUh8OAodFwnmQg
I couldn't make the previously posted link work. :D

Selahs art
07-20-2007, 02:16 AM
I also have a Genius, MousePen 8x6 and pad,
its all I could find locally, and it works fine with all my programs.
actually works very good.

Retha

papertiguer
12-07-2007, 02:15 PM
I just bought the 9X12 intuos 3. It replaced my Intuos 6X9 which had some wear and tear resulting from using my pen tool in the same spots all the time. I love the pen tool and just bought the art pen but never seem to get around to using it. I also never use the button thingies at the top rt and lft corners. Clueless. Diane

zoozyq
12-09-2007, 03:09 PM
I own Painter X, a MacBook Pro, and two Wacom tablets: a 9x12 and a 6x8. I have it set up that all I have to do is unplug everything from my MacBook Pro and slip it into my computer backpack. I keep the smaller tablet, which I purchased on eBay at a great savings, and versions of all the desired cables, etc, in the backpack ready to go, so it's easy to take it all with me at the drop of a hat. I'm ready to do art anywhere! And I love both of my tablets. The 9x12 is good for larger sweeps of the brush--being a fan of Jeremy Sutton, I follow his advice and place the 9x12 on my lap while painting. I also do this sometimes with my 6x8 when I'm at a cofffee shop, but it's small enough that I can also place it on the table next to my computer. I would love to have a Cintiq, but for now, this works for me, and I like the simpler life style.

Materialrainbow
12-11-2007, 10:23 AM
Omg, Now I can just ad this to my list of things I want! :( I want photoshop, a graphic tablet, and a lot of other things :( Too bad I'm not rich! Maybe, I can talk my husband in to getting me one.

Question: Does the small graphic tablets do the same as the big ones? I also would like to know if there is any programs almost like fireworks that I can download? :P

Jslaight
08-16-2008, 08:40 PM
So... Is there nothing here for 2008? This is a Great Thread! I was reading along and then (poof!) no talk about Wacom's Graphire, Intuos, or that Monster that you paint/ draw on directly. Does anyone have THAT?

Yeah, I kinda peed a little when I saw it, too (don't tell). How about the new pressure sensitive pen-brush?!

I wish I had a Mac, too. I'm a Windoze user and I use Corel Painter 10-(X) to work out my thumbnail sketches, values, and solve problems before attacking my canvas or watercolor (full) sheets.

I edit my own reference pics with Corel PSP Photo v. 12 (X2) and have since back when it was owned by Jasc Software, Inc. (PSP Studio v. 4.0 & PSP v. 5.0.1 were sold as a pkg.)
Okay, I'm off topic probably, but I'm so sentimental...

If this topic moved elsewhere, can ya let me know?
Thanks, :)

nakatoni
08-24-2008, 05:21 PM
I use Genius WizardPen 4x3 inches - the cheapest I found. It works great and even though the pen has AAA battery inside you don't feel it's heavy - because it's not. 1024 levels of pressure allow to simulate natural movement of hand holding pencil. It has no problems with Windows XP system, I haven't tried on Mac or other Windows systems, though. It's small so it became too tiny for me ^_^ but I would recommend it to every new to digital art artist as you won't spend a lot of money and you will know if the tablet in general works for you.
Currently I'm waiting for my new tablet - Genius PenSketch 9x12 inches. I would buy Wacom if I had money but as I'm really poor I can't afford it. That's why I found cheaper product, but of great quality comparing to its price. I would recommend Genius to everyone who can't afford Wacom =]

Matthew Swift
09-16-2008, 04:07 PM
My first tablet was a Christmas present given to me by my grandparents, an Calcomp UltraSlate 3. Eventually, it started to have some strange radio frequency problems that made the lines appear to have a wave. For those techy people here, imagine a sine wave at a 45 degee angle. It was very strange, and I couldn't ever find a resolution to the problem, so I reverted back to using a mouse in my artwork...

Until the Wacom Intuos 3 came out. I got the 9x12 version, thinking I would need all the space. It works well for me, but in retrospect, I bet I could have done just fine with the 6x8. I actually use Wacom's software to 'crop' the sensor area an inch or two into the tablet, and make it 'wide' 16:10 format. Weird, but it works for me.

I've logged approximately (this is a guess) 2000 hours on it professionally (doodle time is unknown), and I've yet to change my first nib. The surface has an area worn into it where apparently most of my drawing "traffic" is. You can replace the surface for around $20, but I haven't been bugged by it that much yet.

There are some strange issues. With laptops it sometimes is falsely recognized as a USB hard drive, so you can't boot the computer with the tablet plugged in. Also, every now and then the driver will crash, and you need to reboot in order to use the tablet again.

Once I customized the buttons on the tablet, it increased the speed and efficiency of my work flow incredibly. In Painter X, I can work full screen with only my custom tools and the color wheel showing. Often, there are times where I can work exclusively in full screen mode without a problem.

For Wacom owners, I highly suggest setting a key to UNDO. No more clicking at the top, or hitting keyboard shortcuts. I just smack it with my thumb, and I'm good to go. :)

I don't know why Wacom hasn't partnered with a vendor to create an artists' tablet PC or Mac. With Cintiq techology, it'd be hard to not put it on our wishlists. I love that new little cintiq. There is a bit of lag on those, though. If they ever fix those to where the cursor isn't 1cm behind the stylus, I'll be sure to snag one immediately. :)

moonliter_2
09-17-2008, 05:07 PM
I use the Wacom Intuos 6x8 tablet. I got it off Craigslist for $40!
Some day, I hope to get a larger tablet but this is working quite well, for now.

gaston
10-13-2008, 08:18 PM
I use a wacom intuos3 3x5 and I like it,i have photoshop cs2 and Painter ix and this my joy,make natural art with painter and digital art with photoshop.
This two software support togheter,one is good for digital and the other for painting.The reason is I ame a traditional artist and that my life and joy for a old man(62)
gaston

MvdLinden
12-15-2008, 11:10 AM
any one NOT using a Wacom?

mudcat3
01-04-2009, 10:27 PM
I use a Medion with a 9 x 12" working area. Previously I used a Calcomp 6 X 8" which was too small to work with comfortably.

kptad2
03-06-2009, 12:11 AM
well i started out with a wacom grphire3 4x6 but since a few days ago.. just got a intuos 6x8 not sure if the space makes a diference for me.. so far i like it .. way more sensitive than my last one.. all in all i like it and got half price off of ebay.. so that helps me way more than anything else.;)

kennychaffin
06-14-2009, 08:47 AM
Wacom Intuos 4
Well I got my Intuos 4 ~6x8 and have been playing around with it for a couple of hours and thought I'd share my first impressions

First off .... Black is the new Black :D
It is thinner and lighter than the intuos 3

Instead of the grey I've become used to the box, tablet, pen etc is black. I kinda like it better than the grey. The pen, as some have said feels more solid. The tablet itself has a finely textured surface as compared to the glass-smooth surface of the intuos 3. I like that as well. The controls have lcd labels which is pretty cool, but I have never much used them -- that might change now.

The shape of the surface matches the new "HD" shape of screens -- wider and not as tall, maps better to the screen I'd guess, not sure how that will affect usage.

Now the meaty part I really can't tell that much difference in sensitivity between the two tablets (which I can have plugged in simultaneously). The Intuos 4 does seem to be a bit more sensitive on the lightest strokes, but I certainly wouldn't say this is worth the cost ... unless I find out something I don't know as I use it more. It does have a "Precision" mode which turns very long strokes on the tablet into short strokes on the screen. Not sure exactly how I might use that.

My initial conclusion all in all is that it has quite a few nice-to-have features but nothing that makes it a "must-have" still at this point I'm not thinking I wasted my money, I think it will be a good investment and the features appropriate, useful and usable.

anthonyjohn
06-14-2009, 06:07 PM
I have been checking around the internet for the past couple of days having a look at various tablets. The first thing I found out is that they are expensive.

I have never used one and am not sure just what will suit my needs.
I paint using photoshop, PSP, gimp and several other progs and am quite happy with my results, but as I progress I find that I am lacking a convenient tool, something to augment the mouse. Something which will give me access to easier freehand drawing to add a bit of something to the paintings, something to add a bit of fluency.

I have been put-off by the size of the painting area in the cheaper tablets, but I suppose I will have to buy the cheaper version to learn how to use it.

Wacom have a cheap one called Bamboo but it is very small. I think my best bet is to travel into one of the big towns and try for a demonstration before I finally decide what to buy.

What would be the minimum size recommended to use, not for the actual painting but just to add finishing touches.

kennychaffin
06-21-2009, 07:12 AM
Now that I've had a few days working with the Intuos 4 I must say I love it. Still learning about controls and things like that (but I don't use them much anyway).

Anthony - just my opinion, but I think in the 6 x 8 inch area is about as small as you want to go if you intent to do "serious" painting.

Lifescapes
12-27-2009, 11:47 PM
Is it true that painter is best for natural art like was said in comment number 32? I prefer the real materials to paint but would love the aid of a tablet for working things out. What wacom and what software do I need?

kennychaffin
12-28-2009, 06:30 AM
Is it true that painter is best for natural art like was said in comment number 32? I prefer the real materials to paint but would love the aid of a tablet for working things out. What wacom and what software do I need?
Well I certainly think so but it can be a bit overwhelming with all it's choices and configurability. A new version of Art Rage was just release that many are trying out and liking -- you might check both out. Both have free trial editions.

Lifescapes
12-28-2009, 08:10 AM
Thanks for the suggestion. Do you have
a pen tablet recommendation?

kennychaffin
12-28-2009, 08:22 AM
Wacom. :) I have the Intuos4 which replaced the Intuos3 both are great.

vbuben
07-19-2010, 02:31 PM
I am playing with iPad and Pogo stick. While it's not a professional combo, it's enough to entertain me, and it's a truly portable and reliable sketching setup! I use Autodesk's SketchBook Pro app

MaloCS
07-19-2010, 03:09 PM
I am playing with iPad and Pogo stick. While it's not a professional combo, it's enough to entertain me, and it's a truly portable and reliable sketching setup! I use Autodesk's SketchBook Pro app.


Nice. A few questions for you.


How is the viewing angle? Does the screen black out if you look at it from an angle? I was an early tablet PC user and the viewing angle was horrible. If you shifted your head slightly the image disappeared.
How is the eye strain during long drawing sessions? When using my tablet PC I would constantly get headaches which I attributed to eye strain caused by a poor quality screen and a very poor viewing angle.
How is the Pogo in terms of usability? Is it intuitive? Does it function like one would anticipate a drawing utensil to function?
Can the user turn off the automatic orientation software feature? For example, with an analog sketchbook the artist can turn and rotate the book while they draw which, in my opinion, allows for a much more enjoyable drawing experience. Can this be done with the iPad or does the orientation keep switching on you?
How is the software in terms of usability? Is it intuitive or is there a steep learning curve? Are there TOO many features that can get in the way of being creative?
How is the responsiveness of the iPad? Does it lag, skip or process slowly? Can the artist make quick gestures and have the device respond accordingly?
How does one get the drawings from the iPad to their fully featured PC? Can I email the image to myself or would I have to go through the tedious process of connecting the iPad to my PC, syncing the device and then copying the image to the PC?
Does the software allow for document resolutions larger then the default screen resolution or are you limited to the native resolution of the device?
In your opinion, does the iPad work as a viable digital solution to an analog sketchbook?


I would appreciate your honest opinion to the above questions; I'm not interested in fan boy comments. :)

Like I stated earlier I was a tablet PC user and in my opinion the hardware was lacking. For a dependable digital canvas I just don't think the technology was where it needed to be back in 2005. The iPad with it's advanced screen has me intrigued but I'm a little gun shy about spending the cash. I got burned on the tablet PC and I don't want the same thing to happen with the iPad.

I've had several people tell me to just go test drive the device at the Apple store but from my experience the issues of eye strain and headaches can only be experienced when using the device non stop for hours on end. One just cannot determine from a 10 minute test drive if the device will affect them over a much longer period of time.

Please, please please...... I would really love an unbiased and accurate review.

Thanks. :thumbsup:

vbuben
07-20-2010, 01:39 PM
MaloCS,
I started doing digital sketches about two weeks ago. iPad is my only experience with digital media. I was no fan of iPad before I got hooked to drawing with it (I actually use borrowed iPad), I bought SketchBook Pro for it - it was just 3.99 and after few days I bought Pogo for $14.


How is the viewing angle? Does the screen black out if you look at it from an angle? I was an early tablet PC user and the viewing angle was horrible. If you shifted your head slightly the image disappeared.
I never paid attention to that before you've asked (I would consider that as a good thing already). Now I've paid attention to it - I think it's very wide - i can't speculate numbers, but I really have to tilt it before it starts fading. I guess that is something you can easily verify at Apple store.

How is the eye strain during long drawing sessions? When using my tablet PC I would constantly get headaches which I attributed to eye strain caused by a poor quality screen and a very poor viewing angle
My sessions have never been longer than an hour. For an hour it's definitely fine. Overall, I have very good feeling about the screen.

One note of caution though: image colors differ a bit between what I see on iPad's screen and my laptop's screen (after transferring an image). I am not sure who is to blame, but in a situation where none of them is calibrated, it is something you may expect. Again, the difference is noticeable but not radical (may be it can even be corrected by brightness/contrast settings of both monitors...)

How is the Pogo in terms of usability? Is it intuitive? Does it function like one would anticipate a drawing utensil to function?
It's usable. It's intuitive. For me it's much better than fingers. But it's totally different from from pen/pencil/conte/brush. I am actually having more difficulties drawing (putting down correct outlines) on iPad than painting (working with colors). On paper it's vice versa for me. But huge advantages compensating all inconveniences are layers and perfect, not-damaging erasing/undoing.

Can the user turn off the automatic orientation software feature? For example, with an analog sketchbook the artist can turn and rotate the book while they draw which, in my opinion, allows for a much more enjoyable drawing experience. Can this be done with the iPad or does the orientation keep switching on you?
Yes, you can lock the orientation completely. OR SkecthBook Pro can lock orientation of the image, but still rotate tools and menus, as you change orientation of the iPad. It works very well. Add to that very intuitive resize and panning with two fingers, and you always have excellent access to the part of the image you want to work on.

How is the software in terms of usability? Is it intuitive or is there a steep learning curve? Are there TOO many features that can get in the way of being creative?
It depends on an app of your choice. There are at least five apps that are considered to be more or less "pro" painting apps. I think all of them are easy to use... probably because you just can't create a monstrous application for iPad - too little memory and a weak CPU. I like SkecthBook Pro - I am still discovering new ways of using it. I expect it will be long process as with any media. But it was easy to start.

How is the responsiveness of the iPad? Does it lag, skip or process slowly? Can the artist make quick gestures and have the device respond accordingly?
It varies depending on the app. I find it lagging very little for SkecthBook Pro. However, I think once it was lagging more when I had all 6 layers filled and was painting with wide semi-transparent brush. But it was still not distracting.


How does one get the drawings from the iPad to their fully featured PC? Can I email the image to myself or would I have to go through the tedious process of connecting the iPad to my PC, syncing the device and then copying the image to the PC?
Again it depends on the app. Working with SketchBook Pro I can export it to the iPad photo album. Then I use flickr app to push it directly to flickr. There are also apps that can take any photo (including your work) and push it to e-mail, tweeter, facebook, etc...


Does the software allow for document resolutions larger then the default screen resolution or are you limited to the native resolution of the device? SketchBook Pro always works with 1024x768. Some other apps can go up to 1024x1024 on iPad. However, Brushes app can record your brush-strokes and then replay the sequence on big Mac using high resolution bitmaps.


In your opinion, does the iPad work as a viable digital solution to an analog sketchbook?

for me - resounding yes. Nothing that I know in traditional media can have all of the following at the same time: so portable, so colourful, so readily-available and so versatile media.
- portable - unlimited paper and all supplies in such small and light package
- colourful - full range of instantly available colours with high covering power.
- readily-available - you want to sketch - 5 seconds later you are sketching in any position
- versatile - you can kind of simulate (not ideally of course) pencil, charcoal, colored pencils, watercolor and even oil.

Comparing to analog sketching - it helps to get rid of "white paper" hesitation. Nothing is wasted. Everything can be 100% cleanly erased. Moreover you can "Save as" and branch your work - try different ideas, see what's working and what's not. You can put unlimited layers of color (transparent or opaque) to achieve desired effect or correct something.

Comparing to tablet PC - I have no experience... Price is different (hw+app): $500+$4 vs $1500+$300. iPad have no pressure sensitive stylus, but somebody may manufacture it if iPad drawing becomes popular (just by using bluetooth to send pressure readings back to the iPad).

kennychaffin
07-20-2010, 01:48 PM
Thanks for both the questions and answers! I to am very curious about this. I truly want a portable (usable outdoors) tablet computer that would let me read, surf, and paint. I think iPad is the closest there is at the moment, but doesn't quite do it for me....admittedly I've not tried it....but I do expect a number of tablet computers to show up in the next year...

MaloCS
07-20-2010, 02:46 PM
vbuben,

Thank you very much for taking the time to answer my detailed questions. I really do appreciate the effort you took to help me out. So far, every review I've read on the internet has been from the perspective of a multimedia device intended for movies, music and web surfing. Other then the YouTube painting movies I have not found a detailed review from an artist's perspective.

Again, thank you very much.

:thumbsup:

MaloCS
10-06-2010, 07:16 PM
I finally bit the bullet and got myself an iPad primarily for digital sketching. After one week of use and plenty of frustrated moments I decided that the hardware wasn't what I expected. Even though the device was beautiful and the software was sound the hardware performance was lacking; at least for my specific style of drawing.

When I sketch I tend to use a lot of short, quick strokes that are created by "flicking" the pencil across the surface of the paper. This style of drawing caused some serious lag issues with the device. I would "flick" my Pogo stylus across the iPad surface and the resulting digital line could not keep up with my movements. In fact, there were several times where I would "flick" my stylus and no line would be drawn. I'm assuming this was because the CPU was still figuring out how to draw the last line I "flicked".

In a nutshell, the iPad was not the answer I was looking for in my quest for a digital sketchbook. :crying:

If you're looking for a device that's dedicated to consumption of media then the iPad will surpass your expectations. If you're looking for a viable and reliable solution to drawing and painting I would look elsewhere. I'm just glad Apple refunded my money without sticking me with a restocking fee.

kennychaffin
10-06-2010, 07:54 PM
Thanks for the application-specific review and info!

I'm loving my DroidX, but have not tried painting on it yet...

MvdLinden
10-06-2010, 10:17 PM
I am supposing that mobility was one of your chief desires.. because a tablet would handle your style of drawing just fine. there is also the smart pen which might be very interesting to you. The smart pen does require a special paper. But in essence it records your strokes, and can upload them to a computer.

MaloCS
10-07-2010, 12:53 PM
I am supposing that mobility was one of your chief desires.. because a tablet would handle your style of drawing just fine. there is also the smart pen which might be very interesting to you. The smart pen does require a special paper. But in essence it records your strokes, and can upload them to a computer.

Mobility was a chief concern but I was really looking for a means to draw directly on the computer screen; a process that mimics "real life" drawing on paper. I have an Intuos4 in my home studio but I just don't find it comfortable and efficient for drawing. Sure, painting is easier but trying to draw detailed lines just leaves me wanting more control and a better experience.

For example, when people draw on paper the tend to rotate and move the paper in various positions which allows the artist to obtain the best angle for drawing a specific shape. With my Intuos4 tablet the rotating aspect of drawing is just not efficient. As a result, I find myself craning my neck and body into weird and uncomfortable positions so I can achieve the correct angles for drawing a specific shape or line. Even though the Intuos4 has the rotate feature I just find the process inefficient and complicated.

A few years ago I jumped into the early tablet PCs that hit the market. The Toshiba I spent $2,000 on was a great machine and handled my style of drawing very well. The quick, flicking motion of my drawing style did not bog down the CPU and cause any sort of lag. Unfortunately, the pressure sensitive screen had a TERRIBLE viewing angle and was the source of eye strain and migraine headaches. I found that at the beginning of a drawing session I would be viewing the screen head on which produced a bright, detailed picture. By the end of my drawing session my head ultimately would shift one way or the other which resulted in the screen turning partially black causing me to strain my eyes to focus on the picture. No matter how often I tried to keep a proper line of sight it was inevitable that my head would shift and eye strain would set in. It got so bad that I just put the darn thing in a closet and haven't touched it since.

When the iPad was introduced I was excited to see that the viewing angles were increased. When I test drove the device at the Apple store it was evident that as far as viewing angles were concerned the iPad delivered. Unfortunately, the CPU was not up to the task and needs to get much, much better.

JudiPatooti
03-11-2011, 10:40 AM
I recently got an iPhone 4 and am getting an iPad 2 this weekend. Does anyone have a particular app they recommend for drawing/painting? Which seems to be the most popular for drawing/painting?

How about BRUSHES, DRAWING PAD, SKETCHPRO and such programs. Are they the best?

And, please, what is a POGO STICK.

As you can see I'm a total newbie, so thanks in advance for any suggestions you can give!!

kennychaffin
03-11-2011, 11:06 AM
Thanks for the application-specific review and info!

I'm loving my DroidX, but have not tried painting on it yet...

I got a Motorola Xoom a couple of weeks ago. I'm loving it!

I've not use it for any art, but it is wonderful for browsing, reading, etc. :D

nancy_ellen56
04-28-2011, 08:04 PM
I am looking at the Adesso cyber pad for the possibility of being able to draw on location and later load to a computer. Does anyone have one, used one for drawing. I understand it is really good for text but am wondering just how well it performs as a graphics tablet when it isn't connected to the computer, or if it must be connected to the computer for the graphics capability. Would appreciate any response.

Jedo
08-07-2011, 07:06 AM
Hello,

I bought Trust Flex Design Tablet as my first ever drawing tablet for the sole reason that it was the cheapest one I could find on the market (other than the one from Sweex, and I don't buy anything from Sweex brand unless I feel suicidal). It's only 30 buks and it's been working acceptable so far. Once the driver was installed, it was intergrated into photoshop and it does what I think it's supposed to do - control the opacity and/or thickness of the brush.

The pen has extra buttons on the side, but I tend to not use them at all. I wish that the buttons could be used as the mouse scroll wheel but so far I am not able to make that work. Also there seems to be a button on the top of the pen, which isn't even assignable.

Now to the problems:

I do not know if it is the tablet or something else, but every now and then when I draw the cursor will jump (drawing a line straight across the screen) and I have to undo the last drawing. I tried turning off the pen's buttons so I don't accidently touch them and I tried turning my mouse upside down (because I know my laser mouse tends to move the cursor by itself sometimes) and it helped, but I still get the problem sometimes.

I have also discovered a few things that may be a problem in the future, in which case I will update this review.
1. The pen uses a battery. I thought only the surface of the tablet has to be pressure sensitive. Why does the pen need a battery for the tablet to work? Anyways, my main concern is how often I have to change the battery. I hate these aaa batteries. So far I have only been working with it a couple of days and it still works.
2. Another thing I discovered that if you want to be able to use your fingers on the pad (in real life I tend to use my fingers to smoothen the pencil drawing) then you need a touch sensitive tablet and those are more expensive.

Other then the above two things I mentioned, I don't see a reason to buy a tablet for $2000 when you can buy one for $50.

Jedo
08-12-2011, 04:20 PM
OK - update to my review about the Trust Flex tablet - I understand now what the major cost cutter is for this thing: the pen does not recognize any axis. It only recognizes pressure to control opacity and flow, so you cannot use any of the simulation brush tips available in Photoshop. I guess that's ok for a beginner like me anyway - I use one basic soft brush for most of the stuff.

slowbro
09-30-2011, 06:55 AM
Windows 8 tablet builds are rumored to be coming to developers as soon as this fall, so within the next 2-3 months, maybe even sooner. This means that a Windows 8 build is close to finish and Microsoft can expect to make a Windows 8 shipment sometime next summer in 2012. There is also a Microsoft Build event on September 13-16. The Anaheim California conference is focused on Windows hardware and software developers. Supposedly, it is expected to be Microsoft’s Windows 8 coming out party to get partners and OEM’s started on developing devices and apps for Windows 8.

kotinka
05-26-2012, 07:11 AM
I'm just about to buy the intuos 4, pen only I think. I'm avoiding the touch version because I don't want my hand resting on the pad to cause chaos.

What do you guys think?

Jon Grimes
06-02-2012, 07:11 AM
Great to see this thread here and as a digital artist I use an Adesso drawing tablet to great effect. It was the Adesso tablet that I used for my published work as seen in the Dragon World fantasy art book (http://www.squidoo.com/dragonworld-the-new-dragon-art-book-by-impact-books) by Impact books.

It's considered a budget drawing tablet but has specifications similar to more expensive branded models. I find it really effective and has lasted for ages. I'm not concerned with brand, but more with effectivness and price point. I have recently been sent an intous 5 for review by Wacom, so I will compare the two. If interested, take a look at my review of the Adesso PC drawing tablet (http://www.squidoo.com/pc-drawing-tablet-review) and some of the art via the link here.

Geekette
06-08-2012, 05:29 PM
I've got an Intuos 3 I've used for many years that's still as good as new. Not the cheapest tablet out there but if you're serious about digital art then I definitely recommend it.

kennychaffin
08-28-2012, 08:14 PM
Anyone got the new Intuos 5?

Ballina
11-06-2012, 12:26 AM
I have been using wacom tablets for years with my photography and photoshop. My intuos5 medium touch arrived last week. I highly recommend this touch tablet. With all the hot keys on the side I do not have to use the keyboard at all for CS6. Plus you can turn off the touch control too. I bought a wacom intuos mouse as I like to use a mouse when surfing the internet.

I'm just starting to learn digital painting with cs6. I found a wonderful blog site that a concept illustrator and artist has created many 5 minute video's on digital painting. Google control paint blog as I cannot put the website since I'm new in the posting here. He has made several video's for just learning digital painting and then goes into his game designs and how he uses the photoshop features to paint them. He does not do figure or landscape but he has some resources for sites that do. He uses photoshop and references the free sketchup from google for architecture.

Ballina

Vasili
08-12-2013, 12:06 PM
Anyone got the new Intuos 5?

I have it, but I'm not enthralled with drawing on a tablet and looking at my computer monitor.

That's why I am considering to get a Cintiq 24HD. My birthday is coming up and I've gotten clearance from the tower to land. (buy one)

It's quite expensive $2,499.00, but I believe it would help further my creativity and skills, so I'm 99% sure I will drop the dime and get it.

Besides, my wife wants a new car within the next year, so that probably helped in talking her into letting me get the Cintiq. :clap:

kennychaffin
08-12-2013, 12:09 PM
My issue with those is both the cost and that you are 'locked in' to a specific resolution/display/etc. When new technologies come out -- as they do very quickly these days, you are going to working with older technology. That's a big negative for me (even though I tend to follow rather than lead the bleeding edge).

If you got the dough though and it's what you want, go for it.

Vasili
08-13-2013, 08:28 PM
My issue with those is both the cost and that you are 'locked in' to a specific resolution/display/etc. When new technologies come out -- as they do very quickly these days, you are going to working with older technology. That's a big negative for me (even though I tend to follow rather than lead the bleeding edge).

If you got the dough though and it's what you want, go for it.

I'm wondering in what way the Cintiq can help me expand my skills or help me form new ideas for traditional paintings that I do.

I'm a traditional oil painter and I am wondering if the Cintiq would aid me.

Guess we shall see...

tarakat
12-04-2013, 08:21 PM
I have a Wacom Cintiq 22HD. I sold many things on ebay to fund it and it was worth it! I love, love, love the tablet display. I had a large Intuos 4 for a few weeks and it was ok, but nothing compares to drawing on the display, it is a much more natural experience.