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View Full Version : Homemade Canvas board vs. Strecthed Canvas


wardseward
01-27-2002, 07:33 PM
I was wondering...why would someone take the time to glue canvas to masonite rather than just strecthing a canvas?

The only reason I can think if is to save space if you paint on location and don't want to drag around a bunch of thick streched canvas' (or would that be canvi? hehe).

Are there other reasons?

Ward

LarrySeiler
01-27-2002, 07:49 PM
For some Ward, it might be that some artists are getting more and more uncomfortable painting directly on the gessoed masonite, knowing that with canvas...it could be removed and reattached to another board, or stretched. I do a variety of things, from painting on canvas stretched...to the board directly after gessoing, to adhering canvas with glue to board.

The process of making masonite has appeared to change, and some companies may be including glues and composites that might not be archival or compatible.

Secondly, I know that often I am very aggressive with my paint, and I like the canvas weeve for taking lots of paint and the board beneath as a support such that the canvas is not pushing in and giving. It takes abuse and physical handling.

I know that if in time the board warps or rots...it could be removed from the canvas, and remounted.

Also, I took a huge ammo box and inserted routed boards where my masonite panels conveniently slip in wet and transport with ease. No mess, no odors filling the vehicle on route. The board gives those wet canvases support to remain in their routed slots, and thus travel in my box without getting wrecked.

Larry

Leopoldo1
01-27-2002, 07:55 PM
Originally posted by wardseward
I was wondering...why would someone take the time to glue canvas to masonite rather than just strecthing a canvas?


Ward, Larry pretty much summed it up. For me it is a different feel from the spring of a stretched support vs the no spring of a board support. They are different, no doubt about it especially when that loaded brush hits the two different qualitities in the supports. :oL

Linda Ciallelo
01-30-2002, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by wardseward
I was wondering...why would someone take the time to glue canvas to masonite rather than just strecthing a canvas?

The only reason I can think if is to save space if you paint on location and don't want to drag around a bunch of thick streched canvas' (or would that be canvi? hehe).

Are there other reasons?

Ward
It's easier to glue than stretch, easier to store, don't have to worry about something poking through the canvas, the surface is solid , not wiggly, you can pile them and not worry about putting something on top of the pile, it's easier to get masonite than stretcher bars, easier to frame, cheaper, no wrinkles.

Wayne Gaudon
01-30-2002, 10:55 AM
I only did this a few times and not for any of the above reasons but it seems that it is a very good idea from all points .. what type of glue do you use and how thick masonite do you use ?

vallarta
01-30-2002, 03:33 PM
WHEN YOU DO A 100 PAINTINGS AND YOU HAVE NOT SOLD ONE.....YOU WILL KNOW WHY.....hehehe

vallarta

RaphaelArt
01-30-2002, 04:12 PM
Hi, I was also wondering about this too.
But what if the linen canvas is simply clipped on a wooden board, not glued on it. Take advantage of the board hard surface this way. Then I can take the canvas and mount it anywhere I want.

How inexpensively could that be done?
And will the painting be ruined if linen canvas, primed with acrylic/then grisaille/then many glazes of colors have been applied upon it? Will the paint crack?

Finally if the last resort is to glue the linen on the board (I am using MDF), can that be done if the surface is already primed with Acrylic Gesso. Will the glue stick on it?

Linda Ciallelo
01-30-2002, 07:21 PM
I used rabbit skin glue , some from Rob Howard and some from Daniel Smith. I used 1/8 " masonite. At this thickness it will warp, but it is so flexible that it will straighten out when placed securely in a frame.
I don't know if the already primed canvas will glue properly. You could try one and see how it goes. Rabbit skin glue is very easy to work with and can be used for many things. I think that the glue would stick to most anything that is porous. Be sure to sand the surface of the panel before putting the glue on it. Put one coat of glue on it and let it dry before trying to glue the canvas to the MDF with the second coat.
Masonite is very cheap and Lowes will cut it up for you before you leave the store. I think I bought 64 square feet of cut up untempered 1/8 inch masonite for 18$. That makes a lot of panels.