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4vincent
01-25-2002, 09:57 AM
This is something I came across, and decided to share:

As you know, when/if a worm virus gets into your computer, it heads straight for your email address book and sends itself to everyone in there, thus infecting all your friends and associates. This trick won’t keep the virus from getting into your computer, but will stop it from using your address book to spread further, and will alert you to the fact that the worm has gotten into your system.

Here’s what you do: first, open your address book and click on “new contact” just as you would do if you were adding a person to your list of email addresses. In the window where you would type their first name, type in !000 (that’s an exclamation mark followed by three zeros). In the window below where it prompts you to enter the new email address, type in WormAlert. Then complete everything by clicking add, enter, ok, etc.

Now, here’s what you’ve done and why it works: the “name” !000 will be placed at the top of your address book as entry #1. This will be where the worm will start in an effort to send itself to all your friends. But when it tries to send itself to “!000”, it will be undeliverable because of the phony email address you entered (WormAlert). If the first attempt fails (which it will because of the phony address) , the worm goes no further and your friends will not be infected.

Here’s the second advantage of this method: if an email cannot be delivered, you will be notified of this in your Inbox almost immediately.
Hence, if you ever get an email telling you that an email addressed to WormAlert could not be delivered, you will know right away that you have the worm virus in your system, and can take steps to get rid of it.

llis
02-12-2002, 12:17 PM
Sounds like a good plan to me Ken. Thanks for sharing this.

My virus software will stop these little worms from doing their jobs, but I know a lot of folks that don't have software and the worms just love find them. :)

KanuK
02-15-2002, 06:50 PM
Or you could simply own a Macintosh and NEVER own virus software! I've been using Macs for nearly a decade and have never owned such programs. I was curious and downloaded a program last weekend. In over 4 years with the same computer, no viruses. Think different! Think Apple.

herr bean
02-16-2002, 02:22 AM
Tsk tsk, Kanuk. The reason there aren't many viruses (there are a few out there no matter what many mac fans will tell you) for the macintosh is because there aren't enough users to make it worthwhile, macs are just as susceptible to a viruses as any other computer. I've been using Windows computers for six years now, and I have never had a virus. I've been downloading programs the entire six years, I've probably downloaded over a hundred of them so far, and haven't had a problem yet. Virus problems are overhyped.

KanuK
02-16-2002, 03:05 PM
Seriously, all of those email viruses that have been running rampant with PCs have had no impact on my Mac because the programming involved is completely different. I received a few of them but have never been affected. It's been proven that it is harder to crack/hack into a mac box than it is a PC box. Hence the US goverment's decision to start switching over to Mac servers...

herr bean
02-17-2002, 12:50 AM
Sorry to burst your bubble, but almost none of that is true. Macs are no more difficult to write a virus for than anything else, they just don't have a user base to justify the effort in putting one of them together. Sure, the programming is different, but its not much if any more difficult than for windows. The US Army's decision to switch was unjustified and a wasted of both time and resources. If they had had decent admins to start with than there shouldn't have been a problem. Nearly all problems like that stem from incompetence on the part of the user or admin rather than in the OS itself.

I suppose we might as well drop it though because I doubt that either of us is going to convince the other of anything.

KanuK
02-17-2002, 10:50 AM
Agreed. LOL!

SuzyQ
02-20-2002, 04:32 PM
What if the virus starts with the second name on your list? While it sounds good, I'm afraid this is just a tiny bandaid.

cwnyc
02-21-2002, 02:50 PM
This is nonsense!

Many worms simply go through the entire address book and hit every address, regardless of whether or not the first address is correctly formed.
This is silly and will not protect your machines.

As for the 6 year Microsoft lemming, I'm sure Bill Gates thanks you for your blind patronage and your money. However, if you have an 'always on' connection, I will GUARANTEE that if you use firewall software that monitors attempted connections to your machine, you will see at -least- one attempted break-in per day. It's almost a given at this point. Downloading and e-mailing is not the only way to get a virus/worm/trojan. Other infected computers run through networks testing many different ports on many different machines looking for holes. My Win2000 and XP boxes are firewalled and report attempted unauthorized access with regularity. Virus problems are not overhyped - they cost real money in bandwidth use and admin/security costs. To claim that this is overhyped is completely ignorant and irresponsible.

Apple may have smaller market share compared to MS, but they also enjoy more market share than Mercedes and BMW -combined-, and I know you've seen plenty of those driving around. The Army's decision to switch is based on real world security issues, combined with government shying away from MS in light of the monopoly case. Macs are also much cheaper in the long run, when you're dealing with maintenance and security and admin costs. I've been administrating small and large networks for the past 10 years, and you could not pay me enough to choose Windows over Unix or Mac in most environments. It's just not worth the headaches, no matter how many copies Microsoft sells. A huge bureacracy like the US Army does not just get up and switch mission critical soft/hardware without a LOT of research and proof to back it up.

In the end, you can accomplish anything on either of the 3 platforms - why would you choose the one that has the most instances of security problems and bugs? Because everyone else has one? Not a good enough reason for me, thanks.

Wayne Gaudon
02-22-2002, 12:26 PM
..if you use Outlook you can get a patch from Bill and it won't allow any emails to be sent from your computer without your knowledge. It works cause I tried sending one behind the scenes using a little vb application for sending mail via the back dood and the pc fired up an alert that there was an attemp to send an email and it couldn't go anywhere till I answered the call ...

Outlook 2000 has the feature built into it.

herr bean
02-26-2002, 11:50 PM
Originally posted by cwnyc
This is nonsense!

As for the 6 year Microsoft lemming, I'm sure Bill Gates thanks you for your blind patronage and your money. However, if you have an 'always on' connection, I will GUARANTEE that if you use firewall software that monitors attempted connections to your machine, you will see at -least- one attempted break-in per day. It's almost a given at this point. Downloading and e-mailing is not the only way to get a virus/worm/trojan. Other infected computers run through networks testing many different ports on many different machines looking for holes. My Win2000 and XP boxes are firewalled and report attempted unauthorized access with regularity. Virus problems are not overhyped - they cost real money in bandwidth use and admin/security costs. To claim that this is overhyped is completely ignorant and irresponsible.

Ah, I'm a lemming now, I'll keep that in mind the next time I'm using a mac. I've been using macs for twelve years so maybe Gates wouldn't be so happy after all. I'll stand by my statement that virus problems are over hyped though, in the last twelve years I've known of three people that had viruses and one of those was on a, gasp, mac. Firewalls aren't a bad idea, they're more useful than virus software anyway, but again, they're not the end all be all that you make them out to be. The computer I'm writing this on was on a "always on connection" for a year with nary a problem. I was looking at the log from a firewall a little while back, the majority of the hits that it was getting were for trojans. So they were more than likely just script kiddies out for an easy target. It takes a little bit more knowledge to use the ports on their own, and the people that know how to do that are going to be more interested in bigger targets.


Apple may have smaller market share compared to MS, but they also enjoy more market share than Mercedes and BMW -combined-, and I know you've seen plenty of those driving around. The Army's decision to switch is based on real world security issues, combined with government shying away from MS in light of the monopoly case. Macs are also much cheaper in the long run, when you're dealing with maintenance and security and admin costs. I've been administrating small and large networks for the past 10 years, and you could not pay me enough to choose Windows over Unix or Mac in most environments. It's just not worth the headaches, no matter how many copies Microsoft sells. A huge bureacracy like the US Army does not just get up and switch mission critical soft/hardware without a LOT of research and proof to back it up.


They may have more market share than BMW and Mercedes, but my point still stands. The reason that very few viruses are written for macs is that their small market share doesn't make it worth a programmer's time. Though I have to admit that I think it would be funny as hell to see a killer virus unleashed on all the unsuspecting mac users that think that they are invincible. And sorry to burst your bubble on this one, "A huge bureacracy like the US Army does not just get up and switch mission critical soft/hardware without a LOT of research and proof to back it up." but they did. Why is it that there isn't a huge move to serving with the mac os? Surely it has nothing to do with the dearth of evidence to back up the switch? Show me some evidence and I'll consider switching my views.



In the end, you can accomplish anything on either of the 3 platforms - why would you choose the one that has the most instances of security problems and bugs? Because everyone else has one? Not a good enough reason for me, thanks.

Well I choose this platform because it serves my needs best, unfortunately a mac simply cannot do the same thing. If I could afford it I would have a G4 sitting next to my dell, that would be the ideal situation, unfortunately I can't so instead I will be sticking with the more versatile of the two. I expect you chose your mac for the same or similar reasons.

robinsn
03-04-2002, 09:00 PM
Here's the real scoop on this technique:

http://www.vmyths.com/hoax.cfm?id=263&page=3