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satyakam
03-18-2001, 04:19 PM
<a href=http://www.krysos.com/images/apples.jpg><img src=http://www.krysos.com/images/apples_t.jpg></a>
(PLEASE CLICK ON THE ABOVE IMAGE TO SEE LARGER SIZE)
Hi

This is my first attempt with pastels. I am a little good at portrait sketching with pencils but failed with the pastels. So i tried a little simpler subject. I will be happy to learn the mistakes that might not be obvious to me.

satyakam


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Satyakam Khadilkar
[email protected]
krysos.com (http://www.krysos.com)

[This message has been edited by satyakam (edited March 18, 2001).]

LDianeJohnson
03-18-2001, 07:22 PM
Dear satyakam,

Welcome to WetCanvas and to soft pastels!

Thank you for linking the larger image, it helps immensely in helping you with this piece. It is great that you simplified your subject selection when learning how to use the materials. This can help so much compared to a really complex arrangement. This setup alone has so much going on within it that more would have been difficult.

I see you used the dimpled side of your paper or board. This machine made pattern can give texture to pastel paintings. But when just learning, it can be something you have to fight. Try using the other side of the paper ("felt" side), or if this is a board, a more regular surface. That way, it will be easier to see your results.

Your composition is nice. The bowl and lines in the flooring or table are positioned in a pleasing way. If you do this type of arrangement again, you can place a fruit on outside of the bowl for interest.

Your sense of observation is good. I see you used directional strokes related to how things were moving. The flooring you have strokes going in the direction you see them as well as in the bowl and fruit. You even show that you see the reflected light under the fruit inside the bowl (the far right fruit). Reflected light is lower in value than the lighted areas. You have the right idea, just a bit too brilliant. The fact that you saw reds from the apples reflected into the upper part of the bowl is very good.

The fact that you arranged the fruit in different directions is very nice. The bottom-most apple...the bottom of it is pushed in a bit too much almost like two differing views. Practice foreshortening on this one some more. The round brownish spot you have used to indicate the core should be more of an ellipse from this vantage point.

On the top left and bottom apples...your highlights and reflected light are handled the same. Look again, squint both eyes, then close one eye, looking with just one. This will reduce the light coming into your eye. Observe that the light on top of the apple is really much brighter and warmer than the light reflected beneath. Even if you have a limited number of pastel sticks, these two areas can be achieved nicely.

All of the above suggestions are minor corrections. The bulk of what you did looks just great! And it looks like you had one main light source which many beginners do not consider. Terrific for your very first pastel, no matter what you have used or painted before.

Please post more of your pieces as you do them. You seem to have a natural feel for pastel.

Diane


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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

satyakam
03-19-2001, 09:19 AM
About Lighting...
I was able to fairly complete the above drawing before the natural sunlight changed. But if it were a more complicated one,

what do you people normally do to keep the light constant. ?
What kind of light you normally use when painting at night ?
Do you keep different lights when lighting up the subject and the actual drawing ? I mean doesn't the color of light have any effect on the painting while working at night ?

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Satyakam Khadilkar
[email protected]
krysos.com (http://www.krysos.com)

LDianeJohnson
03-19-2001, 07:55 PM
satyakam,

All of your lighting questions are very good. Here are some suggestions regarding some of them:

1. To keep consistent light on a setup, either purchase an artist's lamp on a stand or if you are not to the point yet where you wish to spend $ here is a solution. Take a tall table lamp in your home. Remove the lamp shade. Form a dome with a neck shape out of aluminum foil. Fashion this over your lamp so that it forces the light in one direction yet the aluminum does not touch the bulb. place this near your still-life setup which will give the sense of one light source and make it easier to paint.

2. What kind of bulb at night? This is a vastly debated question. If you come home after work to paint, use incandescent light or whatever you like. Just be CERTAIN to use the same light on your painting as you have on the setup. Otherwise, you'll have real color matching problems. Ideally, you'd like to use a florescent or daylight bulb on your setup and on your painting area. But either way, just be consistent. The very best solution however, is to paint the painting in the same light it will eventually be viewed or hung in.

3. Yes, the color of the light effects the painting at night, as well as your eyes. When tired, your eyes have a difficult time. When it's dark inside OR outside it is difficult. But can be overcome. I painted for many, many years at night, after 8-12 hour work days in a darkened basement studio. I tried all of the suggestions above and all worked, but with a caveat. I never finished a painting until I tested it in daylight (on a weekend for instance) as well as when I was rested in the setup I used.

4. It also matters whether you are painting from a real live setup or from photographs.

Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

satyakam
03-20-2001, 02:52 PM
Diane,
Thanks a lot for the information.
Will use it to work on the next pastel..

satyakam

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Satyakam Khadilkar
[email protected]
krysos.com (http://www.krysos.com)