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View Full Version : a H Hensche(color); H Hensche(grayscale)


bluochre
01-21-2002, 07:03 PM
this is s common hensche work.

henry's palette consisted of enough tube colors on his palette so that each value in a particular study was a different color. . . or a mixture of another color and complement. each value change of the yellows or pinks or whatever in this color study are not mixtures of one yellow, or one rose, etc. perhaps this clarifies what NYARTIST was stating.

bluochre
01-21-2002, 07:05 PM
considering what bruin wrote in another thread.................does this grayscale read easily ? or, as he suggests, not clearly.

henry
06-12-2003, 02:26 PM
I would first like to say that the painting you posted was done when
Hensche Had failing eyesight when he was in late 80's an is not a good
example of his finest. The coloration in this particular painting is beautiful however.
Hensche taught that when we start a painting, we should exaggerate the differences in the coloration of the masses. if the student steps back and realizes that he has put the same color in two places, he should step forward, look at the motif and make a visual comparison of the two spots, and determine the difference. Hensche hated formula. His painting was NOT about mixing arbitrary colors to make everything different, but was about acute observation so as to truly SEE the difference and note the difference.
His exaggeration of color was done with purpose. He painted knowing
that paintings are seen indoors in subdued light. By pushing the color of the masses apart and to their predominate strength he created paintings that could be "read in normal indoor light.
He also pushed the coloration to accentuate the "light Key". The ability to do this requires the development of the memory of keys, so that they can be compared
and the quality of color of different times of day and lighting conditions can be separated and understood.
This example that was posted above may mislead some to think that painting sunlight is about using pure color. i will follow up this with another
landscape. of Hensche's

henry
06-12-2003, 02:37 PM
painted in 70's

henry
06-12-2003, 02:40 PM
grayday

henry
06-12-2003, 02:42 PM
I would first like to say that the painting you posted was done when
Hensche Had failing eyesight when he was in late 80's an is not a good
example of his finest. The coloration in this particular painting is beautiful however.
Hensche taught that when we start a painting, we should exaggerate the differences in the coloration of the masses. if the student steps back and realizes that he has put the same color in two places, he should step forward, look at the motif and make a visual comparison of the two spots, and determine the difference. Hensche hated formula. His painting was NOT about mixing arbitrary colors to make everything different, but was about acute observation so as to truly SEE the difference and note the difference.
His exaggeration of color was done with purpose. He painted knowing
that paintings are seen indoors in subdued light. By pushing the color of the masses apart and to their predominate strength he created paintings that could be "read in normal indoor light.
He also pushed the coloration to accentuate the "light Key". The ability to do this requires the development of the memory of keys, so that they can be compared
and the quality of color of different times of day and lighting conditions can be separated and understood.
This example that was posted above may mislead some to think that painting sunlight is about using pure color. i will follow up this with another
landscape. of Hensche's