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View Full Version : first oil pastel experience, Help!


glorius
02-14-2001, 03:26 PM
I have oil pastels given to me as a Christmas gift several years back but still unused. I know they were cheap but they seem so hard and scratchy. I want to give them a shot on a practice portrait. Where do I start? I have mineral spirits to soften them, but I have no idea what to do. Keep in mind I am a beginner at this with no budget for high quality expensive materials. I just want to pratice with them before I put more $$$ into it. Tips, please, lots of tips...

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I just draw what I see
GloriusDae

djstar
02-15-2001, 12:45 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
Don't know if it will work, but I am still watching....
......
we will wait together!
your fan.
dj*

Roan
02-15-2001, 06:36 AM
Just so you both don't think this post is being ignored :P


Wish I could help you but I'm not versed in oil pastels and there aren't many people that frequent here that are.

You might want to go through all the forum messages as I remember a few posts on oil pastels a while back.

Sorry I can't be of much help here http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/frown.gif

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Call caraid tadhal tric, 's call caraid tadhal ainmig.</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">Friends are lost by calling often, and by calling seldom.</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

cagathoc
02-15-2001, 08:17 AM
Hey Glorius,
I have used oil pastels myself. I feel that they are a great way to bride the gap between painting and drawing.

You can use the sides and swipe your picture in in bold stroke and then blend with a brush and the mineral spirits. I have also used vegetable oil for blending. You can use your fingers, q-tips, erasers ... to blend.

Or you could hatch in your picture, in soft pastel style, and blend selectively.

Here a some good links to demostrations and other info to get you started: http://www.odd-goddess.com/oilpastel104-tutor.htm http://crafts.dm.net/convention/990228e.html http://www.meininger.com/ArtEdResPages/OilPastelPostcards.cfm


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Cindy~

p.s. any specific questions --- please post and I'll try to help!!! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

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Cindy~

cagathoc
02-15-2001, 08:24 AM
Oil pastels are really fun to use for resist techniques. You can build up layers of color and selectively scratch out areas revealing the color underneath.

You mentioned that they were really hard and old. If they are a few years old, they may be too hard to use easily. There are many inexpensive very nice oil pastels you can buy fresh for easier use: cray pas expressionist sets are nice (cray pas invented the oil pastel) - even crayola makes a set now called portfolio oil pastels. They are super soft and have georgeous colors. Only for practice though because the crayola are nor artist grade pastels. But the cray pas are.

I used Sennelier and found them VERY expensive and super soft. They were good for writing on top of harder pastels.

For paper - regular pastel paper is nice. Watercolor paper also works well. You might start out with a watercolor piece as a base and add to it with the oil pastels.



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Cindy~

cagathoc
02-15-2001, 08:28 AM
Here's an old oil pastel I did where I used the resist technique:

<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/lib/09-Feb-2001/botoil.JPG" border=0>

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Cindy~

cagathoc
02-15-2001, 08:30 AM
One other thought... I have also used the SHIVA oil sticks - actual oil paint in a stick form. The colors are richer and easier to blend but more expensive.



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Cindy~

Roan
02-15-2001, 09:34 AM
Thanks for diving in, Cindy :P

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Call caraid tadhal tric, 's call caraid tadhal ainmig.</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">Friends are lost by calling often, and by calling seldom.</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

glorius
02-15-2001, 04:55 PM
Thanks, Cindy!!

I'm farther along than when I started. I think I may find I prefer soft pastels b/c of easier blending still

Still welcoming tips!

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I just draw what I see
GloriusDae

Roan
02-15-2001, 08:21 PM
Here is the Oil Pastel Association web site address:
http://www.allart.com

Unfortunately, they don't have a lot of information on their site as yet. They do have oil pastel article reprints from the The Artist's Magazine you can order:
http://www.allart.com/artpub.htm

Hope this helps somewhat.

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Call caraid tadhal tric, 's call caraid tadhal ainmig.</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">Friends are lost by calling often, and by calling seldom.</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

Sandi
02-15-2001, 10:00 PM
Neat links Roan!

There's not much to add to Cindy's wonderful advice.
One word of caution, be careful not to mix the oil sticks and the oil pastels together. Oil sticks dry in time, whereas oil pastels never dry.
For highlights in the eyes and other places that you need to keep fresh colors from applying, just take an empty ball point pen or similiar tool and indent the paper somewhat.
They're a lot of fun!

A fun exercise we did in jc was to invent our own color schemes from a black and white photo of a master painting. I did one of Monet's haystack scenes and had a blast scratching in the rhythms of the hay.

I wonder if warming your pastels slightly would help? They have a wax binder...

Hope this helps

LDianeJohnson
02-16-2001, 12:39 AM
glorius,

If you have had these oil pastels for some time, it is good advice as others have stated here, that you purchase some new ones. Even buying a small, starter set would be ideal to try. Not only for the freshness of the sticks, but to see if they are what you'd really like to paint with in the long run. Once you've tried them, then you can decide whether to invest further or switch to another media.

There are oil pastels, and there are oil pastels. Not knowing what brand you have also makes it difficult to determine what to specifically do as a remedy.

If the sticks you have are scratchy, you can try to rejuvenate them, but they still won't have the original properties that would allow you to really experiment.

Have fun!

Diane

cagathoc
02-16-2001, 07:20 AM
I forgot to mention that you can also use them on canvas and prepared panels.

I agree - the soft pastels blend much easier...



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Cindy~

Sandi
02-16-2001, 07:52 PM
Thanks Diane!! Guess I can stop wondering now... http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Ohju
02-16-2001, 08:52 PM
Me being a soft pastelist...was afraid to ask such a question on oil pastels. Since someone else was interested and posted I am grateful. hee hee http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif I have bought a cheap set also and think, since I like my chaulk, that oil pastels smell and look like crayons. But I will give them a try. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif
I like that smiley...can't you tell? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

glorius
02-17-2001, 04:20 PM
Thank you all for the help! And guess what! I found a box of lovely soft pastels today as I was cleaning out my stuff to move! I can't wait to use them! Thanks again for the advice

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I just draw what I see
GloriusDae