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happycamper
09-17-2005, 07:43 AM
Is there any way to put paint that is purchased in jars into tubes?

This may sound crazy, but I really love to paint straight from the tubes but it is far more economical to use jars. I use Golden's Heavy Body and I use a TON of it. I just found out that I can purchase it in large quantities in jars. I'd love to do it but am hesitant.

I've messed around with a stay-wet pallette and I actually like it, but still, most of the time I really get going when I'm painting out of the tube, so I'd like to have that option as well.

Any thoughts on this?

Thanks!
Maggie

nevbogus
09-17-2005, 08:27 AM
i'm not sure if i have got you correctly but why not paint straight from the jars. i nearly always paint this way and mix on the canvas with lots of wet in wet where needed.

timelady
09-17-2005, 02:54 PM
I completely understand! I have the same situation - I love tubes but buy a lot of jars. But I'd never thought of transferring them. And the large Golden tubes aren't as good value as the jars/tubs.

There are empty tubes you can buy... I've seen some at Atlantis here in London. Basically the end is open so you stick the paint in and then fold and crimp the metal end. I guess you'd have to pack in the paint to get as little air in as possible? They are cheap... where are you exactly? I'd do a search for tubes but don't know if you're US UK, Australia, the moon? ;) I bought one once and put hand cream in it. :D

Tina.

Leslie Pz
09-17-2005, 02:58 PM
There are, as Tina mentioned, tubes you can fill. I'd suggest you try filling squeeze bottles, if you find tubes too messy and difficult.
-Les

gnu
09-17-2005, 05:09 PM
I use a squeeze bottle for my impasto gel. I would use these too rather than jars, use a teaspoon to transfer, easy to wash and dry completely before using for another colour/medium.

AtrediesNT
09-17-2005, 07:56 PM
I have doen this...and the solution is easy.
You can co to your local Chemist and By some plastic syringes.They have such a wide range. Then it's a case of sucking it up....and squirting it in.

Yes it's time consuming,but then you have your tubes filled and less risk of losing the pot.
(pun intended) :)

happycamper
09-27-2005, 05:03 PM
Thanks for all the replies. Sorry it took me so long to get back here -- I've been spending most of my free time at the easel -- I have two pre-schoolers, so free time is a premium.

Well, I tried the syringes -- great idea in theory, but it seems the paint is so thick (especially when I add Golden's Extra Heavy Gel Gloss :D ) that it is difficult to get the paint inside.

I'm in the States (Ohio to be exact) and haven't come across any tubes that can be filled -- but honestly I haven't looked that hard as of yet.

Also, I'm very new at this (just started painting at the beginning of this year) and love this forum -- I don't post much, but I read a TON. I've sold 10 paintings :clap: so far and am trying to get some of the business part of it taken care of. I'm thrilled to have found a paint that suits my style and now want to purchase it in larger quantities -- I paint very (!) thickly and would rather not have to be stingy with it.

Thanks again for the replies!

Einion
09-28-2005, 08:36 AM
Do you want to do this because you like to apply the paint directly from the neck of the tube?

Well, I tried the syringes -- great idea in theory, but it seems the paint is so thick (especially when I add Golden's Extra Heavy Gel Gloss :D ) that it is difficult to get the paint inside.:) You'll find it's the same with empty tubes (harder in fact) sorry.

I'm in the States (Ohio to be exact) and haven't come across any tubes that can be filled -- but honestly I haven't looked that hard as of yet. Let me introduce you to your new best friend: online suppliers!

Einion