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gmc
02-04-2001, 06:17 AM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/lib/04-Feb-2001/daniellenose.jpg" border=0>

Joe, I hope this worked this time.

gmc
02-04-2001, 06:25 AM
Hi all, the above is from me. I was hung up in cyberspace for a while. Anyway that is my daughters nose. We are both unhappy with it. I somehow ended up with a great deal of pitting. I feel it looks awful. I used an unknown paper, but quite smooth, a little more tooth than canson. I began with nu-pastel and layered with rembrandt. I blended slightly at one point but used no fixative. Not all areas of the portrait are pitted. Just the nose, forehead. I am assuming it is my application or layering (or just not knowing what I am doing) Can it be fixed, should or can i remove whats there and do that area again. Exactly how much can be layered or should the colors lay next to one another. How is this done. Hoping someone can offer some suggestions. As perhaps I am using pastel wrong. gloria

sandge
02-04-2001, 08:06 AM
Hi gloria777a

I don't think I'm going to be of much help here. I just wanted to say that I think that's a great nose! Of course, I do like a bit of texture in pastels. And then again, flesh is not entirely smooth.

However, I understand that this does not fit in with your goals for this picture and is perhaps out of keeping with the smoothness of the rest of it. So, what I would suggest is that maybe the holes or pitting are where the pastel has not filled the tooth of the paper. Do you think that's correct?

I have found that my pastels come out with a smoother look when I used a very grainy surface that accepts a lot of pastel, such as Art spectrum colourfix. Also, I often work 'backwards' to most pastellists in that I use very soft pastels at the start to fill the grain of the paper. The I use harder pastels over the top - they do remove some of the softer pastel (which I don't mind) but it is a useful technique for blending without rubbing and it helps push the pastel into the paper more.

By the way, how's the tinyhead coming along?
best wishes
sandra

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http://www.fletcherfineart.com

gmc
02-04-2001, 08:23 AM
sandra, thanks for responding. So, you can use a soft pastel under a nupastel or harder pastel. I am so new to this pastel business. Your suggestions are going to be tried as soon as i finish typing. Of course i enlarged the nose to show the pitting. in other words apply the pastel however it works for you. is that right? there is no right or wrong way. I don't blend with a finger or stump because i don't like the affect. but will blend with another color or stick. is that right? Ok i will try it.
as for the tiny head. i think i am ok there. i used what you said and tried some other things. I did get it to 60 x 60 using your advise and adding some of my own. but i should write my steps down as that was a week ago and am trying not to forget. I got sidetracked with this nose thingy. I was trying to post it for about a week. It ended up lost, then found, then not registering and finally something told me "I am not authorized to process this function." I became so frustrated that i mailed Joe and he was kind enough to give me step by step instructions which proved out to take me a matter of seconds, following the instructions ,to get the nose to post. I am not the computer person that like to think I am. But i must confess it is a lot of fun. I am going to try your suggestions with the nose. thanks for the advice. if i get anything i will repost the nose.( http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif I know how now!!)gloria

sandge
02-04-2001, 09:25 AM
Originally posted by gloria777a:
So, you can use a soft pastel under a nupastel or harder pastel. ... in other words apply the pastel however it works for you. is that right? there is no right or wrong way. I don't blend with a finger or stump because i don't like the affect. but will blend with another color or stick. is that right? Ok i will try it.
gloria

gloria, never be afraid to experiment. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif You've got to aim for mastery of your materials and really push it to see what it's capable of so you can make it work for you. That means trying everything - hard pastels over soft, soft over hard, different papers, watercolour or acrylic underpainting - everything you can think of!

Regarding the tiny head, I can't remember if I mentioned that when you have your 60x60 file and choose file>export gif89a, make sure that the 'interlaced' box does not have a cross in it. Then, you go into your profile (the link is at the top of the page just below 'add topic' and 'reply'), and choose the link at the top of your profile page for modifying your tinyhead. Then you upload the picture from your computer just like when you posted the nose! And that's all there is to it! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

good luck
sandra

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http://www.fletcherfineart.com

[This message has been edited by sandrafletcher (edited February 04, 2001).]

Roan
02-04-2001, 11:16 AM
Originally posted by sandrafletcher:
Hi gloria777a

. . . The I use harder pastels over the top - they do remove some of the softer pastel (which I don't mind) but it is a useful technique for blending without rubbing and it helps push the pastel into the paper more. . . .

Sandra,
This is interesting! I just realized that I do the same thing -- in a manner of speaking -- but didn't realize I did it until you posted. I've found that certain tints of my various brands do the same thing -- they tend to "blend" more than apply more color -- and I've set those to the front of my rows and use them the same way you do. It's not an intentional thing. Just something I discovered and subconciously arranged my pastel box accordingly. Thanks for putting it into words for me :P

Now I'm thinking of trying it backwards like you do http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Nan danadh mo lmh mar a dh'iarradh mo shil!</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">If my hand could do as my eye would desire!</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

Roan
02-04-2001, 11:19 AM
Gloria:

I agree with Sandra, I really like the nose how it is. I also use a gritty surface. When I do use a laid paper, even one that appears smooth, I usually layer it silly to avoid holes. Course, I end up with too much pastel sometimes and have to remove it :P

Sandra:
btw I just bought 2 sheets of Art Spectrum and I'm itching to try it out :P

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Nan danadh mo lmh mar a dh'iarradh mo shil!</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">If my hand could do as my eye would desire!</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

gmc
02-04-2001, 11:25 AM
Roan, This was the nose I was trying to explain to you last week. I couldn't get it to post though. I think I will also experiment with Sandra's technique and see what happens. I do think that the "most suitable" pastel I did was actually done with all Nu-pastel. Maybe that's why it blended so nicely for me. The hardness eased the color into the tooth of the paper. Just guessing. gloria

sandge
02-04-2001, 01:25 PM
Originally posted by Roan:

Sandra:
btw I just bought 2 sheets of Art Spectrum and I'm itching to try it out :P



Can't wait to hear how you get on with it. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif



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http://www.fletcherfineart.com