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Volfie
09-11-2005, 12:22 AM
Day 12 on the my torch: I knew it was going to happen some weekend, a Honey Brown Beer bottle found itself being heated by my Minor. It ended up in a rather free form piece with Moretti glass but I was wondering if it's going to blow up my kiln. Has anyone ever figured out the COE for beer bottles? :rolleyes:

Giselle

G.L.McBead
09-11-2005, 01:02 AM
It's probly about 90-94 coe thats what a wine glass is.
G.

Fana
09-11-2005, 03:36 AM
My guess is less than 90. I tried a broken waterglass a few days ago and it was much harder to melt than Bullseye which is 90.

I got this information from the Warm Glass site:
"Window/Floatglass - Its COE depends on the specific formulation used and can be as low as 83 or as high as 90, but it generally ranges from 85 to 87."
____
Fana

Volfie
09-11-2005, 11:29 AM
My guess is less than 90. I tried a broken waterglass a few days ago and it was much harder to melt than Bullseye which is 90.

I got this information from the Warm Glass site:
"Window/Floatglass - Its COE depends on the specific formulation used and can be as low as 83 or as high as 90, but it generally ranges from 85 to 87."
____
Fana


So, let's see if I understand. My newbie brain thinks that if the beer bottle glass is actually somewhere around 90 that it is compatable with Moretti, right? But if is the lower range, 85-87, then there might be problems. What would the problems consist of? Will it actually blow up in the kiln? Will it simply fall to pieces? Or will it not be a strong enough meld to be durable? :confused:

BTW, I'm glad there are other folks sticking stuff that might not be rod shaped under their torches. This morning I was looking at a small rock and wondering if I could encase it in glass... :evil:

Giselle

jaylee78
09-11-2005, 11:36 AM
Moretti is 104 COE, if the bottle is 90 COE it is NOT compatible. You could try the stringer compatiblity test . . .

Volfie
09-11-2005, 11:55 AM
Moretti is 104 COE, if the bottle is 90 COE it is NOT compatible. You could try the stringer compatiblity test . . .

Which is... ?

Giselle (only 12 days on a torch and only saw my first real live person doing it yesterday :o )

JameyLynn
09-11-2005, 12:39 PM
It is safe to say that the beer bottle is not compatable with anything. Even another beer bottle. The COE's can vary greatly, even depending upon when it was made by the very same company. A person I know just fused several bottles together to make a cheese tray I believe it was. The bottles came from the same pack of beer. It only took a day for it to start cracking apart.

Some of the colors of bottles are beautiful, but they are best used by themselves and not mixed with any other glass unfortunately.

Ted Trower
09-11-2005, 02:41 PM
It is safe to say that the beer bottle is not compatable with anything. Even another beer bottle. The COE's can vary greatly, even depending upon when it was made by the very same company. A person I know just fused several bottles together to make a cheese tray I believe it was. The bottles came from the same pack of beer. It only took a day for it to start cracking apart.


This is more likely an indication of inadequate annealling than of incompatibility.

JameyLynn
09-11-2005, 09:01 PM
his is more likely an indication of inadequate annealling than of incompatibility.

hahaha! I'm not telling the person that did it! They are one of the top teachers here in the U.S. for fusing! I can't begin to imagine the look on their face if they were told they did a bad anneal! hahaha! That would be hysterically funny to see!

But yes, you are correct, annealing could be an issue.

Fana
09-11-2005, 11:24 PM
BTW, I'm glad there are other folks sticking stuff that might not be rod shaped under their torches. This morning I was looking at a small rock and wondering if I could encase it in glass... :evil:

Giselle [/QUOTE]

LOL No rock incasing here but I'm looking at Goldstone (Aventurine in glass terms I believe) and thinking about melting it. I don't like it that much as a necklace, poopy brown in my opinion, but I also have a very nice midnight blue and a dark green.

A long time ago I did some fusing also. Everything from window glass, stained glass, aluminum foil, wire and hemlock branches got tried, it was a lot of fun. I remember the only information available at the time was a book/manual from BE (Man, I'm old)

Like you I just started beadmaking about a month ago but did stained glass before. So far I'm using my leftover sheet glass, I just try not to mix it when I don't recognize the type or company.
____
Fana

PS: My real name is Gisela, the german version of Giselle :)

bclogan
09-12-2005, 11:45 AM
So, if I'm going to use some brown bottle glass (to make some nice spacers with, say - so no compatibility issues) would I use a boro annealing schedule for them?

michal ann
09-12-2005, 06:00 PM
Bottle glass (not glasses glass) of all colors has a range of coe from app. 80 - 86. It cannot be used with any other soda lime glass without the risk of incompatability/explosion. It is very stiff AND very shocky and really not much worth the effort. If you are stubborn--as I and my husband are--you can keep trying. (We have been working to develop standard recipes, molds, and annealing schedules for recycled glass tiles for several years.)

Use can use glass from only the same bottle with more glass from the same bottle. A conservative Bullseye Glass schedule should anneal fine.

I have read many people who use their scrap stained glass for beads. They have great colors but are taking their chances on breakage. I wouldn't sell beads made from such glass. Adventurine is human-made glass with copper particles and should be used sparingly.

If anyone has had great success with recycled bottle glass for anything, I'd love to hear about it. Have a great day,
Michal Ann