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DLJohnson
09-02-2005, 02:02 PM
Hi all, :wave:

I have found a neutral ph glue used by pro artists to attach canvas to board, etc. I am going to give it a try.

This is what Chris Saper uses to attach Wallis (and canvas) to boards (the paper, not Kitty).

The company is very professional, a necessity to me. Oh, and I am in NO way affiliated with them, just want to share a great resource.

I appreciate any feedback, I need to glue some stuff.

Donna

www.demco.com (http://www.demco.com/)
or
http://www.demco.com/CGI-BIN/LANSAW...40):92200594240 (http://www.demco.com/CGI-BIN/LANSAWEB?PROCFUN+LWDCWEB+LWDC025+PRD+ENG+FUNCPARMS+ZZWSESSID(A0200):63355982170283510622+ZZWNAVPAG(A0100):PRODUCT+ZZWBTRKID(A0120):PSK0000+DATESEQ(A0140):92200594240)
http://www.demco.com/webprd_demco/product_block/D82/162082100.jpg
DEMCOŽ NeutralBond Modified Vinyl Adhesive

7.0 to 7.5 pH
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Sep-2005/7846-painterportrait.gif

DLJohnson
09-03-2005, 12:17 PM
Hi,

I am a bit miffed here as I thought sure people are mounting the Wallis paper.

Oh well, I feel like a pioneer. After Chris, of course.

I have done searches but you can imagine how many threads come up. I would have to sift through a lot to find out about gluing, etc. I really hope to find out a little more before I order the glue next week.

Donna

SweetBabyJ
09-03-2005, 02:58 PM
Most of us mount by using a two-piece taping method at all four corners of the paper rather than gluing it down tight. It is what Kitty recommends, and saves the cost of archival glue.

When mounting for final display, I often use archival photographer's spray adhesive. Works pretty well, is easy, and doesn't kill my pocketbook.

DLJohnson
09-03-2005, 10:48 PM
Hi SBJ,

I read about taping but I was sure it was being mounted someway. I am beyond glad you posted. Come the end of next week I would be up to my earlobes in glue and mdf. What a big waste of time really (and money).

I owe you one!

Thanks,
Donna

Chris Saper
09-14-2005, 06:12 PM
Hi Donna,

Actually I began using the Demco glue because Dan Gerhartz uses it; I consider him a museum quality painter, and trust waht he would say. In the several years I've used I've used the glue to mount on Wallis (and several more years of mounting on canvas), I haven't yet had any difficulties. Obviously that's not enough time to gauge the multigenerational potential:)

Demco glue is not heat reversible.

tim at www.newtraditionsartpanels.com offers a Wallis mounted board with a heat reversible adhseive.

K Taylor-Green
09-14-2005, 08:29 PM
Hi Chris! And a big welcome to our Pastels Forum!! I am thrilled to see you here!
Course, I don't use glue to mount my Wallis either. I tape, like Julie. Just easier, I guess.
I hope we are going to see a lot of you around here.

cherylleclairsommer
09-15-2005, 01:33 PM
Hi to all. This is my first post on wc. I've found the information very helpful.

Donna, thanks for the tip on archival glues. I've been trying to find a good method to "dry mount" Wallis paper to foam core in order to frame using spacers instead of mats. Do you glue the paper to the support before you paint or after? If you mount it after, how do you assure the paper will adhere without bubbling? If you mount before painting, can you underpaint with watercolor or pastel/turpenoid?

Can someone please explain how the 4 corners method of taping works? Do you use some kind of two-sided linen tape? If so, where do you find this? How do you "stretch" the paper to be sure it doesn't buckle with varying weather conditions? Thanks for your input. Cheryl

K Taylor-Green
09-15-2005, 01:53 PM
Hi Cheryl! Welcome to the Pastel Forum!
The 4 corner method of taping is very simple. Just lay your paper down on a drawing board or piece of foam core, then tape the 4 corners down diagonally. I use regular drafing or masking tape. It's cheap.
When I am ready to frame, I use a linen tape to hinge the paper on a new piece of foam core, cut to the size of the mat.
Hope this helps.

Kathryn Wilson
09-16-2005, 11:01 AM
tim at www.newtraditionsartpanels.com offers a Wallis mounted board with a heat reversible adhseive.

Hi Chris - a big welcome to the Pastel Forum! Just now finding this thread and want to know what the product Tim mentions is:

acid-free buffer mount tissue

???? I haven't a clue.

Kat

cherylleclairsommer
09-16-2005, 11:45 AM
Kate, Are you saying you hinge with linen tape even though you are cutting the backing board the same size? I hinge the linen tape when I'm using a mat. But how do you hinge when you cut the backing board the same size? On the back? I know this is a technical question but the pastellists I work with don't have a solution to the problem how to attach the pastel to the backing board if you decide to frame without a mat (when the piece isn't already dry mounted). Thanks for being here. WC is great! Cheryl

K Taylor-Green
09-18-2005, 12:40 PM
Cheryl, I cut the backing board the same size as the mat. I hinge the mat to the backing board. Sorry I wasn't clearer.

SweetBabyJ
09-18-2005, 01:08 PM
Hi to all. This is my first post on wc. I've found the information very helpful.

Donna, thanks for the tip on archival glues. I've been trying to find a good method to "dry mount" Wallis paper to foam core in order to frame using spacers instead of mats. Do you glue the paper to the support before you paint or after? If you mount it after, how do you assure the paper will adhere without bubbling? If you mount before painting, can you underpaint with watercolor or pastel/turpenoid?

Can someone please explain how the 4 corners method of taping works? Do you use some kind of two-sided linen tape? If so, where do you find this? How do you "stretch" the paper to be sure it doesn't buckle with varying weather conditions? Thanks for your input. Cheryl
Okay, I do it slightly different- mainly 'cause I'm cheap.

I have four or five working backing boards which are stained and ripped and dinged up- they are not-for-show. I cut my paper to the size I want it, lay it face down on the backing board and place a 2-3" strip of 3" masking tape at each corner with about half of the sticky side hanging off and over the edge of the paper. (Think now- I mean, if I were to press the tape down all the way, the paper would now be stuck, face down, onto the backing board. I don't press it all the way down, though, I only make sure it is stuck well to the Wallis). Now, flip the paper over- on each corner is a sticky-side-up tab of tape, right? Line the paper up on my backing board, and using four more strips of 3" tape, I tape these "tabs" down to the backing board, opposite corners, so I can "stretch" the paper well. Ta-da! It's solidly mounted for work, easily removed when finished, and I can paint right to the edge (which is good because I don't mat, I usually float the work when framing).

So the piece is done, and I gently pull it off the working board, and remove the tape (sometimes, a bit of the Wallis backing comes away, but that's okay- it's not going to show at all). When I mount to frame, I use archival (acid-free) foamcore, lightly mark where my corners should go, lay the work face down on glassine, and spray both the back of the work (paying attention to the corners) and the middle of the foamcore with archival photomount spray, then flip the piece over, CAREFULLY position it, and lay the glassine on top to smooth it and seal it down tightly. You gotta be fast and sure- once it's stuck, it's stuck- so make sure you lay it down level and square. Sometimes, having another person to help can make all the difference- especially if it is a big piece. (Big pieces "bow" in the middle when you try to hold them flat and horizontal- makes it easy to lay it down crooked).

There's LOTS of ways to do it, though- you just need to find the one you like best.

cherylleclairsommer
09-19-2005, 12:58 PM
Thanks so much for the information. I have been trying to frame without mats and when I use tape while painting, then the pastel doesn't go to the edges. I'll try the method for painting (by taping on the back) and the method for drymounting (I've tried that but wasn't clever enough to use glassine over the piece in order to flatten). Thanks again. Cheryl

DLJohnson
09-23-2005, 02:19 AM
Hi Donna,

Demco glue is not heat reversible.

tim at www.newtraditionsartpanels.com (http://www.newtraditionsartpanels.com/) offers a Wallis mounted board with a heat reversible adhseive.

Hi Chris,

Thank you for the link. I looked at his site and am going to call in an order. I would much rather get them done for me if possible. I like the idea of the gatorfoam vs. a hard surface.

I was hoping to get reliable, up-to-date information before buying the glue.

The recommendation from you says a great deal.

Hi SBJ and Kate,

I have been taping the same or similar to you both if I understand correctly. I put tape on the back corners and sides on bigger pieces, flip it over and tape the tabs down (just not hinged, they won't stay put for me). The tabs help me to stretch the Wallis a tad after using liquid under paintings. I seem to need to adjust them back to flat after. I have been making the hinge more rationally to mount them for framing and leave the mat loose but with spacers attached to it. Should the mat be taped too?

Hi Cheryl,

I had a lot of the same questions floating around in my head so I am glad to get some input here too. I am going for the easiest. I never have those days to just prepare surfaces in advance like I would like to. If I can grab it and go to work I am more productive so I need to have a ready supply. Cutting and gluing is not all that appealing anyway and if I don't have to transfer it from my boards to the acid free it is even better. It seems easier and quicker to frame.

Hi Kyle,

I think the tissue is in sheets placed behind the work but would like to know more about it too. I will ask and let you know.

My 2 cents:
I really would rather have more ready-to-use. I don't know why taping and stretching annoys me; it's not that big of a deal. I have always used watercolor blocks for watercolor pieces and love it that I can use them for pastels. They go great with a few jars of Colorfix and I don't mind preparing them for some reason.

For really big pieces, full size figure, I am still undecided. Should I prepare my own mdf with pumice or marble dust or use the pre-mounted Wallis?

I will find out how big he makes them. I bet he will make custom sizes. I was about ready to order a roll of Wallis and the glue but will get a good selection of the pre-mounted instead.
I will let you know what I find out. :cat:
Donna