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Bill Wray
08-28-2005, 12:33 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Aug-2005/65633-Cambraia_grey_copy.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Aug-2005/65633-Northern_California_8x10_jpg.jpg
The first 6x8 was a Plein air study done in Cambria. The next one 10 x12 is looking at it and painting out of my head and pushing it so far in another direction that it may not qualify for this section.

glo_anne
08-29-2005, 12:13 PM
I love the fenceline running through the painting. I don't know the answer to your question about ignoring the reference, but I'll be watching for the answer.
~ Glo

gaugin
08-31-2005, 12:29 PM
Hi Bill, I think they are both great. But personally perfer the second piece.
I would suggest, or at least in my opinion. That location work, alla-prima, and any case that sets you in nature, "ie the real world". In direct observation is but building blocks for your own artistic departure. You can stay close to your reference, or move it in another direction with your artistic license. Having a strong foundation in visual communication gives you the ability to speak differently, personally and convincingly.

IMO you accomplish all of that in your second piece. I would say that which you ignored in your reference, was supplemented by that which you have aquired through study and observation. To produce a individual vision.
And is that not freedom of artistic expression.

If a painting of mine suits me, it is right. If it does not please me, I care not if all the great masters should approve it or the dealers buy it. They would be wrong. (Arshile Gorky)
:D

Bill Wray
09-02-2005, 02:34 PM
I love the fenceline running through the painting. I don't know the answer to your question about ignoring the reference, but I'll be watching for the answer.

~ Glo
thanks Gio. it's a quiet fourm so I'm not worried.

Bill Wray
09-02-2005, 02:36 PM
Hi Bill, I think they are both great. But personally perfer the second piece.
I would suggest, or at least in my opinion. That location work, alla-prima, and any case that sets you in nature, "ie the real world". In direct observation is but building blocks for your own artistic departure. You can stay close to your reference, or move it in another direction with your artistic license. Having a strong foundation in visual communication gives you the ability to speak differently, personally and convincingly.

IMO you accomplish all of that in your second piece. I would say that which you ignored in your reference, was supplemented by that which you have aquired through study and observation. To produce a individual vision.
And is that not freedom of artistic expression.

If a painting of mine suits me, it is right. If it does not please me, I care not if all the great masters should approve it or the dealers buy it. They would be wrong. (Arshile Gorky)
:D
We are in agreement. Thanks for your thoughts.

painter30
09-03-2005, 11:44 PM
:eek:Hey Bill, though I think both of these are somewhat weak in regard to vision and follow through I do enjoy the effort you made by picking yourself back up again and knocking the dust away. These are looking like fabulous studio works, more akin to Corot or even Shiewnmuller the younger and less like the plien air pieces you are quickly becoming infamous for. I like this SOHO gallery feel, can you do these 12 x 20 feet? Something about these make me think massive loft space, big hard beams and firm steel support girders that are more bars trapping the wild beast then bamboo that bends with the wind of change. Keep up the excellent work maestro.

Eva.

Bill Wray
09-04-2005, 03:50 AM
Very funny Adolf. I always thought you were a lousy painter.

LarrySeiler
09-05-2005, 11:55 AM
You know...I was thinking some about this very thing this morning. WE might well be responding to a color mood, drama of the light or whatever as we stand before a scene...and the composition or subject per se is more the "cause"...

That being said, the reference or resource becomes something to ingest, chew, digest, and regurgitate as we discover what fancied our aesthetic soul.

A setting may be so complete in and of itself, the masses so ideal that our response is to put it all down because it all made an impression on us. To copy a setting exactly when only a glimpse of what actually moves us is present may prove a detriment in the end to really highlight or feature that element.

ITs been said that the novice painter will paint everything they see, the mature will discriminate. How far does that discrimination go? It needs to go as far (IMHO), as is necessary to faithfully get in touch with what compelled the heart to respond with paint. That may prove a far dilineation, but not far enough it the artist fails to be resilient and flexible in boning out what that essential is.

So...I find what you've done here exciting not only in how a painting has worked itself out, but in observing what makes an artist an artist...

thanks for sharing...

Larry

Bill Wray
09-06-2005, 09:47 PM
You know...I was thinking some about this very thing this morning. WE might well be responding to a color mood, drama of the light or whatever as we stand before a scene...and the composition or subject per se is more the "cause"...

That being said, the reference or resource becomes something to ingest, chew, digest, and regurgitate as we discover what fancied our aesthetic soul.

A setting may be so complete in and of itself, the masses so ideal that our response is to put it all down because it all made an impression on us. To copy a setting exactly when only a glimpse of what actually moves us is present may prove a detriment in the end to really highlight or feature that element.

ITs been said that the novice painter will paint everything they see, the mature will discriminate. How far does that discrimination go? It needs to go as far (IMHO), as is necessary to faithfully get in touch with what compelled the heart to respond with paint. That may prove a far dilineation, but not far enough it the artist fails to be resilient and flexible in boning out what that essential is.

So...I find what you've done here exciting not only in how a painting has worked itself out, but in observing what makes an artist an artist...

thanks for sharing...

Larry
Thanks Larry you have a great painting mind. Thatís for taking the time to put it in context.

Bill Foehringer
10-05-2005, 02:48 PM
Your question of whether the second painting of yours was pushed too far beyond the ref made me think of this. When we stand in front of a subject we bring all of our observations and past painting experiences with us. How much of what we put down is what is before us and how much is what we add between eyes and finger tips? We are not cameras and the excitement of what we do comes from within. So the second represents your internal feelings about that scene. Very cool to let that flow. BillF

Bill Wray
10-13-2005, 01:27 AM
I'll try and let if flow as easily as poetic speech comes to you. thanks!