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Cattleprod Karl
08-17-2005, 11:46 AM
Hi all...still fairly new around here so I'm still finding my way. I was wondering about making prints of my paintings. If I wanted to, say, print greeting cards from my paintings how would I go about it? Is it best to use a photograph of the painting or use a scanner and go with that? I'm thinking about selling prints so I suppose I'm looking for the best way to produce print-quality replicas of my paintings. Thoughts and ideas? thanks.

JustinM
08-17-2005, 12:23 PM
Well, Im sure there are people on here with very strong opinions either way. For me its a matter of choice (but that probably has to do with how similar most of my paintings are in size and texture).

In my opinion, the choice depends on a few things. If your painting is very large, obviously a scanner is impractical (unless you wanted to go to a print shop with a drum scanner perhaps) - also texture plays a big role.

For most simple reproduction of my works I tend to use a scanner, but I tend to do relatively small paitings (1/4pg or similar) and I have an 11x17 scanner. You can also scan a large painting in parts and then piece them together in photoshop, but that can be tricky.

dbclemons
08-17-2005, 02:02 PM
Scanners generally give you better color matching than photos, but there's that size issue that Justin mentions. As for selling them, you'll want to (possibly) be able to do a high volume, so a good print store that deals with artworks is a safe bet, or else look into buying your own printer that can give you what you need.

laudesan
08-18-2005, 09:17 AM
Do a search in the tech forum and the wash cafe, type in print and see what comes up. This subject was duscussed fully not too long ago, when Char was buying her new printer, adn Uschi was preparing to print our her paintings for sale..


~

Cattleprod Karl
08-18-2005, 10:59 AM
Do a search in the tech forum and the wash cafe, type in print and see what comes up. This subject was duscussed fully not too long ago, when Char was buying her new printer, adn Uschi was preparing to print our her paintings for sale..


~

Thanks, I'll try that.
Karl

pampe
08-18-2005, 12:42 PM
I found that the scanner just doesn't give me the resolution that my camera does...and I do paint large...so the scanner is out of question any more


Depends on what you have an how well it works

what are you using now?

And remember if you make prints....regular printer ink is NOT archival

Cattleprod Karl
08-18-2005, 12:48 PM
I found that the scanner just doesn't give me the resolution that my camera does...and I do paint large...so the scanner is out of question any more


Depends on what you have an how well it works

what are you using now?

And remember if you make prints....regular printer ink is NOT archival

See, never thought about the archival bit. I generally go with Epson printers since they seem to work best for me. Plus they have 6 different colored inks, as opposed to 3 or 4. As for the scanning, I guess that'd be a problem, too, though scanners nowadays are much better than they were even a year and a half ago.

Perhaps this is cause for another thread, but what is the best way to photograph your art? So far I have used my digital camera (only 3 megapixels) and I keep getting these "off" angles.

stephie20
08-18-2005, 07:47 PM
Karl........I use both camera and scanner....tend not to use scanner and stitch for large pieces anymore, especially since I got my new toy, Nikon D70, but I get good results from my scanner, although some blues I have a problem with...I have an Epson Perf. 2400...........If your using a camera, and want good quality shots for selling, DO use a Tripod, makes such a difference, and take on the highest setting possible........If your camer won't take a tripod, set up something that you can stand it on.......put your pics up vertical, I usually put mine on a chair, stand the camera in line with the middle of the pic...and do it outside on a bright day, not blazing sun though.......hope some of this helps....

Annapet
08-18-2005, 08:06 PM
I was asking the same question a week or so ago. Been lurking here...

Thanks to you all.

Cattleprod Karl
08-18-2005, 09:52 PM
Karl........I use both camera and scanner....tend not to use scanner and stitch for large pieces anymore, especially since I got my new toy, Nikon D70, but I get good results from my scanner, although some blues I have a problem with...I have an Epson Perf. 2400...........If your using a camera, and want good quality shots for selling, DO use a Tripod, makes such a difference, and take on the highest setting possible........If your camer won't take a tripod, set up something that you can stand it on.......put your pics up vertical, I usually put mine on a chair, stand the camera in line with the middle of the pic...and do it outside on a bright day, not blazing sun though.......hope some of this helps....

Steph, thanks very much. I do need to get a tripod. Even then, how do you ensure you're getting a straight-on shot, so that the camera is squarely facing the painting? I can see myself eventually needing a better camera with higher resolution. One of these days I'll be brave enough to use an ENTIRE sheet of watercolor paper and then I'll need BIG megapixels!

Annapet, you're welcome. If my ignorance pays off, then just wait...I'll be ignorant again, trust me.

Yorky
08-19-2005, 03:18 PM
Karl - this is a perennial theme and has been discussed recently here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=224218&highlight=notelets)

For me, the digital camera is best, you can photograph any size of original, and distortion and colours etc can be adjusted in photo programmes such a Photoshop Elements and Paintshop Pro. I use both. Psp is best for distortion etc, PSE is best for colour correction.

If you are printing on card stock, the paintings are going to be reduced in size, so any reasonable 3Mp camera will do, and as Stephie says natural light is best.

Epson printers have archival inks for the most part, but for cards, I don't think it is vital, they are ephemera and are not expected to last decades like prints or originals.

Doug

Cattleprod Karl
08-19-2005, 03:39 PM
Thanks, Doug. I'm PM'ing you with another question. Hope you don't mind me bugging you. ;)