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skallagrig
08-11-2005, 01:21 PM
Hi everyone, haven't posted for ages, been moving round but have finally got my act togehter and done a bit of work :)

I'm having to use a mirror over a dressing table as my easel though :rolleyes:

and if anyone is interested Bratislava is not bad at all but NOOOO art shops to speak of :(

this is approx 18" x 22"

Lyn

Ruth Grinstead
08-11-2005, 01:38 PM
Hi Lyn

I think she is lovely, all the more so for the unusual easel :D

Not sure about Bratislava though - I would suffer art shop deprivation syndrome.

Ruth

*Marina*
08-11-2005, 02:10 PM
What a beautiful painting.
Marina

pjo
08-11-2005, 02:38 PM
This is a beautiful painting, she looks very pensive. I'm glad to hear you are painting agian, and flexible enough to work with what you have.

Bringer
08-11-2005, 04:27 PM
Hi,

Indeed long time you haven't posted.
That is indeed a great painting.
I know that you're technically good so I won't bla bla bla about that. I'll just say that what really values your painting it's the expression of the character making us think in two ways in my opinion. One : what is she seeing outside. Two : what is she thinking ? Is she really paying attention to outside or just looking and wondering about something else ?
Did I make any sense ?:-)

Regards,

Josť

CindyW
08-11-2005, 05:40 PM
Lyn, it's beautiful, very soft and contemplative, the grays all help give Abbey the attention. Very nice!
Cindy

Masque
08-11-2005, 06:15 PM
Hi, Indeed long time you haven't posted.
That is indeed a great painting. I know that you're technically good so I won't bla bla bla about that. I'll just say that what really values your painting it's the expression of the character making us think in two ways in my opinion. One : what is she seeing outside. Two : what is she thinking ? Is she really paying attention to outside or just looking and wondering about something else ? Did I make any sense ?:-) Regards, Josť

Boy, I agree totally with Jose. He said it all pretty much right down to the nat's eyebrow. And, yes, Jose, you definitely make sense. Well said. :clap:

John B
08-11-2005, 06:19 PM
Wonderful, Wonderful painting.!!!!

John

Kathryn Wilson
08-11-2005, 06:41 PM
So glad you've gotten back to work - if this painting is an indication of your talent, you must persevere and work no matter what! I know that is not easy, but this is excellent work and you must feed your talent (and us too)!!

ponting
08-11-2005, 06:53 PM
if anyone is interested Bratislava is not bad at all but NOOOO art shops to speak of :(
Where the devil is that and how could you survive with no art shops?

This is wonderful Lyn. I too love the mood and the questions it invokes more than anything.

Good work, :clap:
Cheers, Dianna

zefi
08-11-2005, 07:54 PM
Wonderful work Lyn! Where is Bratislava? I live in Tasmania, Australia, about an hour from Hobart in the south and there is only one art shop there. I buy most of my stuff on the internet, which when buying pastels is just not right!

Can I ask a general question here about paper? What is the best paper to work on? I keep switching and changing - sometimes I use canson or mi tients paper on the rough side, other times I use the smooth side. Other times I use plain brown wrapping paper on the rougher side, other times I use plain sketching paper. Each one has its own benefits and frustrations. Too smooth and the pastel just moves all over the page. Too rough and you cant fill in the 'squares' and get a speckled appearance. Advice?

FaeLynn
08-11-2005, 09:56 PM
Wow Lyn!
That is really outstanding work. I am impressed with your, umm...improvisation for the easel! Good job! See? Where there's a will, there's a way. The art will find a way out of you if the need is great enough!
Can't wait to see more! Just great.
~Fae Lynn :cat:

angecald
08-11-2005, 10:19 PM
Hi, Lyn, I remember this one and have been wondering how it ended. I, too, admire the expressiveness more than the technical side (although that's impressive). Those hands just say it all.

Kathryn Wilson
08-11-2005, 10:30 PM
Can I ask a general question here about paper? What is the best paper to work on? I keep switching and changing - sometimes I use canson or mi tients paper on the rough side, other times I use the smooth side. Other times I use plain brown wrapping paper on the rougher side, other times I use plain sketching paper. Each one has its own benefits and frustrations. Too smooth and the pastel just moves all over the page. Too rough and you cant fill in the 'squares' and get a speckled appearance. Advice?

Art Spectrum paper - produced in Australia - so you should be able to find it locally. It is a sanded surface paper and comes in many colors.

zefi
08-12-2005, 04:37 AM
Thanks Kyle, I've seen that paper but never used it. I must give it a try then. Thanks!

MelG
08-12-2005, 04:56 AM
Lyn,
a wonderful painting undouptably! The grayness and moodiness, the thoughtfulness and "heaviness" of it.. And you just proved what I always believed: Art and talent do not depend on the means. It is not a matter of paper, easel, pastels or whatever. You could make a magnifiscent painting on toiletpaper, so to speak, if there really is something in you that needs to come out. I totally agree with Fae Lynn.
Bravo! :)
Applausingly yours,
Melina.

ps. Bratislavia is in Slovakia, Europe :D

skallagrig
08-13-2005, 05:26 PM
Thankyou everyone for the comments and encouragement, and yes Josť you made perfect sense :)

I have been debating whether to put some more detail in the window to differenciate between the outside and the inside, was thinking branches trees clouds etc. But i don't want to loose the feel by making it too lively.

Any thoughts?

Lyn

ponting
08-13-2005, 07:14 PM
No Lyn, I don't think it needs anything. It could be the inside corner of a building and what you are seeing is the rest of it. Simplicity is what is working here so I vote for leaving it alone.

Cheers, Dianna

A Few Pigments
08-13-2005, 07:30 PM
When I saw the word Abbey I thought this would be a landscape. I can believe this is a pastel, but how in the world did you make it look like a photograph? Do you blend with your finger a lot? Do you need hundreds of pastels to do subtle transitions from light to dark like this? Itís a beautiful painting.

Paula Ford
08-13-2005, 08:56 PM
Fantastic work!

skallagrig
08-16-2005, 05:01 PM
I've made a few alterations to this, i think i've managed to keep the mood ???

Bruce,

No i don't hvae hundreds of pastels , i probably only used a couple of dozen on this and alot of them were in the different grays in the background.

For the skin i just keep on pitting tiny dabs of pastel on top of each other untill i think it looks like i want it to.

On the clothes i wanted it to look quite painterly so i smudged gently with my finger a few times, don't really like to touch the painting though.

I've tried to get a photo that looks like the original but it's sadly lacking but i think you can get the idea.

lyn.

ps on this one the window is leaning the other way, i will take a straight one i promise :rolleyes:

zefi
08-16-2005, 05:51 PM
Hi, I just adore this painting. My gut instinct was 'NO! dont touch the window'. Its perfect as a blank, more mystery, gives you more of that whole inside looking out feeling... its just RIGHT. I could write an entire essay on the symbolism of the painting (I was always good at that sort of thing in school!) :)

I'm also impressed that you say you dont touch the painting with your fingers much. How then do you manage such smoothness? I use my fingers all the time. In fact its one of the things I always loved about pastels and charcoal... I love using my hands to paint. (and i'm always dirty and my office is covered in fingerprints... the CSI team would have a field day here!).

Lately I've gotten into using smoother paper to paint on cause it allows me to swish the pastel around more and create texture with my fingerprints.

Do others use their fingers to smudge smooth and blend?

skallagrig
08-16-2005, 06:10 PM
Thanks for the feedback,

Zefi,

I know what you mean about being on the inside looking out, now you can see the outside its not so much mystery any more, i'll put it up to experience :rolleyes: I think i've got to start thinking more about how i want the finished article to look rather than trying to implement what evryone says.

Very hard when you're a newbie and so unsure of yourself :rolleyes:

I've attached a super close up of her face, i didn't blend at all here only putting on tiny dots of colour.

Lyn.

zefi
08-16-2005, 06:19 PM
Hi Lyn, I dont see any close ups, but I know what you mean about being unsure. I'm always sending photos of my work to friends to get feedback. You have nothing to feel unsure about though. Your work is wonderful.

As for the window, you've left it soft enough that its barely there so you havent ruined it. dont worry.

I've found in the past that the works I like best are the ones I dont finish entirely. I'll often work on something and then stop cause I've reached a spot where I know its finished or cause I am not happy with where its going. I leave it for a day or a two, on the easel, and then I'll be walking into the office to do something and suddenly I'll see what it needs. A smudge here, a speck of colour there, a bit more depth in shadow. Whatever. Sometimes it takes a few strokes and then suddenly its finished.

One of my favourite still lives from my art school years is an unfinished still life. I do believe its what you DONT say that often says the most. I'll try to find it and post it in a new thread. I think I have it on a cd somewhere....

zefi
08-16-2005, 06:43 PM
Lyn, I've put that unfinished work in a new thread entitled 'undercooked' work. go check it out. :)

Simon Bland
08-16-2005, 09:49 PM
Lyn,

I like the way you've found a balance between what to show in the window area and what to leave out. Andrew Wyeth said that if you show glass as it really looks the effect would be too surreal.

The skin and hair technique that you've shown in the close up is very, very good.

Simon

zefi
08-16-2005, 11:18 PM
Lyn I saw the close up now. Its amazing. I love the effect! :)

Trilby
08-17-2005, 11:07 AM
Lynn, you may be new-ish to pasels, but I would say your "art soul" is old. Your work has such sophistication and maturity. I like "Abbey" very much. The sense of mystery of emotion draws one in. Your use of light and shadow on her face and shoulders just adds to the feel. Your "little dots of color" is a fine technique that lends brilliance and vibrancy. Pastels have a crystyline structure that contributes to their brilliance and blending them breaks down that structure. Blending is useful in places, but preserving that reflective refractive structure in places makes a painting sing more. You've resolve the previous issue with the hands splendidly. Don't add another thing. The viewer needs room to fill in the details themselves.
Very splendid job here.
TJ

Masque
08-17-2005, 11:54 AM
...I think i've got to start thinking more about how i want the finished article to look rather than trying to implement what evryone says. Very hard when you're a newbie and so unsure of yourself :rolleyes: I've attached a super close up of her face, I didn't blend at all here only putting on tiny dots of colour.Lyn.

Lyn, I know well exactly where your coming from on that thinking issue. But gotta tell ya, newby or no, your painting is wonderful just exactly as is. One thing did hit me as I studied your close-up and then the full image. For what it's worth, I was struck by the missing iris. My comment is intended as something to think about only--is there any way you can add a couple very tiny curved lines of color to indicate her iris? What hit me first was that the iris was missing. Then I rationalized she was most probably looking too far toward her nose. But, it was a distraction for me and a couple tiny line of color I think would eliminate any distraction. Unless of course you intended her gaze directed away. If so, I stand corrected.

As everyone has been telling you, your a fine artist. It takes a special talent to have a painting talk to the viewer, and yours definitely does. You should be very proud. I hope you keep posting, your work is not only a delight it's a great learning experience for the rest of us.

A Few Pigments
08-18-2005, 09:34 PM
Hi Lyn, thank you very much for your detailed answers :) . Iím amazed at how you did the face with little dots of colour. I donít think Iíd ever have the patience for that way of working. I always get frustrated that I canít do my paintings more quickly than I do. Thank you again for your answers. :)

Mikki Petersen
08-19-2005, 12:34 PM
Lyn, you have a masterpiece here. This painting sings a song, different to each viewer according totheir own experience. This is what makes a painting great, to tell a story that connects the viewer to your message. You are also quite wise to learn early on to invite advice but to take the advice only so far as it conforms to your expectation of your work.

Encore!
Mikki

PS: Where is Bratislava?

skallagrig
08-19-2005, 02:55 PM
Thanks everyone for the wonderful comments,

sorry i can't do much posting at the moment, haven't got the online time :crying:

and i'm on the move again!!!!

West Coast of Ireland now........hope i get a better easel arranged :D

lyn