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Marc Hanson
08-10-2005, 05:39 PM
A studio oil from this 10x14 plein air study. No photos taken to use, all from the field study. Comp changes of course because of format change, but stuck pretty true to color from study unless a change was needed.

Not a good photo, will try again with more light to shoot in a day or so. The big one's not this dark and warm.

1-"Simply Calm" oil, 20x24, on canvas (to be stretched), 3 days.

2-"Simply Calm-Study" oil, 10x14.

Robert
08-10-2005, 06:53 PM
I like it, Marc. Do you find reference photos all that helpful? I was recently dissappointed by my own reference photo attempts, especially the color.
I noticed you wrote "three days" after the size. Is that generally how long it takes you to do a studio piece? Also, do you change painting methods when you're working inside?
I'm curious because I'm just starting down this road - wondering what's ahead. So far, the hardest things for me are staying on task and then figuring out when it's finished.

mnpainter
08-10-2005, 06:55 PM
Marc,

Love those warm golden oranges in the cattails line. Also love the change in sky, with the warmer more mood setting atmospherical feel. Really nice. Do you find it hard to strech and match the image to the frame?

Ben

Marc Hanson
08-10-2005, 08:06 PM
I like it, Marc. Do you find reference photos all that helpful? I was recently dissappointed by my own reference photo attempts, especially the color.
I noticed you wrote "three days" after the size. Is that generally how long it takes you to do a studio piece? Also, do you change painting methods when you're working inside?
I'm curious because I'm just starting down this road - wondering what's ahead. So far, the hardest things for me are staying on task and then figuring out when it's finished.
HI Robert,
Thanks. Reference is not very helpful, I agree. But, sometimes if I'm painting large things like trees it's helpful to have some reference so that I pick up on the subtle anatomical diifferences in order not to make a 'stylized' version of a specific tree......or whatever it might be.
I don't change methods on purpose but the studio does 'strange' things to my efforts. Paintings take longer than from life? and they usually end up more detailed? and as you say, staying on task is tough to do. I wander outside in thought, wishing and wondering why I'm staying inside. In general I don't like it at all. But until I am comfortable painting 20" to 36" paintings from life outside...it's a necessity.
I spent so many years in the studio with reference, guessing at what it was I was painting that now that I'm comfortable outside I really fight being in the studio environment.
I make it a point not to spend too much more time than 2 or 3 days and even that's too long IMO. But I guess if you have the time, you spend it! A good goal would be to set the timer and go for it as if painting from life. The only problem with that is that you're not painting from life. So the raw information that you take in from life isn't present making a lot of what is done a guessing game, or a problem to figure out instead of a reaction to life. That's the biggest difference, one which you've probably already figured out.

Marc Hanson
08-10-2005, 08:11 PM
Marc,

Love those warm golden oranges in the cattails line. Also love the change in sky, with the warmer more mood setting atmospherical feel. Really nice. Do you find it hard to strech and match the image to the frame?

Ben
Ben you mean stretch the finished painting to the stretcher bars? No I don't have trouble with that, but I did this (stretch canvases) for frame shops for several years while in high school. Stretched hundreds and hundreds of canvases of all sizes that were sold to painters. Also stretched the old fashioned canvas transfer prints onto bars and then framed.
Thanks for looking and commenting.

Robert
08-10-2005, 08:41 PM
Thanks for the response, Marc. I really do like what you've done with the painting. You've kept it fresh - and that's the key, IMO.

bluemagoo
08-10-2005, 10:39 PM
i learn so much just reading the threads. thanks for sharing your great paintings!

Bart W
08-11-2005, 07:06 AM
I understand your feelings about the PA - Studio issue Marc - but to me it looks like you made the main group of trees look stronger - with a different (more?) character.
I suppose that there's a slight change of interest when doing a studio piece?

Moosehead
08-11-2005, 10:55 PM
This is fantastic Marc.
Although you mention it takes some extra effort to do the studio work, it does seem to pay off. Your plein airs are great, don't get me wrong-some of the best I've seen actually. But I think the studio painting was definitely time well spent. It appears the studio piece has just a bit more detail, and the values a little more worked out, yet it still looks fresh.

However, most importantly, I do think when you pull off two paintings as nice as this, the 20 x 24 just has to "grab" the viewer more than the smaller piece. Despite what we all hear, I think sometimes size does matter. :D

hopper
08-12-2005, 02:47 PM
A couple of years ago the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts had an exhibit of the Hudson Valley River painters. The show was called 'American Sublime'. It was amazing to see these works in person and they all seemed to have a particular quality about them, hard to define. Your studio painting seems to have this influence, a touch of the 'sublime'.

robyn

hopper
08-12-2005, 02:58 PM
One of the things that made the American Sublime paintings so impressive was their size (big, very big) I was hesitant to mention this though after Jon's comment.
robyn

PurplePalette
08-12-2005, 06:13 PM
I Say You Rename This Painting!!!
Something Like................. "simply Beautiful" Sounds Good!! This Is Not Only Beautiful But Inspiring!!

Marc Hanson
08-12-2005, 08:48 PM
i learn so much just reading the threads. thanks for sharing your great paintings!
Your welcome Melanie. Thanks for the comments.

Marc Hanson
08-12-2005, 08:51 PM
I understand your feelings about the PA - Studio issue Marc - but to me it looks like you made the main group of trees look stronger - with a different (more?) character.
I suppose that there's a slight change of interest when doing a studio piece?
Yes Bart, I'm mostly just 'griping'. :wink2: What you say is the good part of working these things out in the studio. More time to develop a stronger image than what that quick impression gave. Thanks for looking and comments.

Marc Hanson
08-12-2005, 09:01 PM
This is fantastic Marc.
Although you mention it takes some extra effort to do the studio work, it does seem to pay off. Your plein airs are great, don't get me wrong-some of the best I've seen actually. But I think the studio painting was definitely time well spent. It appears the studio piece has just a bit more detail, and the values a little more worked out, yet it still looks fresh.

However, most importantly, I do think when you pull off two paintings as nice as this, the 20 x 24 just has to "grab" the viewer more than the smaller piece. Despite what we all hear, I think sometimes size does matter. :D
Thanks Jon. You're absolutely right, size does make a difference...and enough on that one!!! :D
Anytime one heads into a museum or gallery it's not the little pieces that draw you to them, it's the wall sized Church's or Bierdstadts...or Sorollas. I agree totally.
But I think everyone who works en plein air, and God knows we're as common as high gas prices now, gets that sensation of pure honesty in their reaction to a stimulus no matter how finished or successful the work turns out. That is about as basic an artistic emotion as there is I think, and is why working from life has become so popular with us in the way it has. That 'feeling' is what I miss in the studio even though the end result can be more in terms of it's depth, impact and ...........SIZE. :wink2: :D

Marc Hanson
08-12-2005, 09:04 PM
A couple of years ago the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts had an exhibit of the Hudson Valley River painters. The show was called 'American Sublime'. It was amazing to see these works in person and they all seemed to have a particular quality about them, hard to define. Your studio painting seems to have this influence, a touch of the 'sublime'.

robyn
Thanks Robyn. That show was here last year and for some reason I never made it up to the Minn Art Institute to see it and I'm kicking myself as I speak still.
I appreciate the thought. I think I'll leave the 'size' topic alone now! :wink2:

Marc Hanson
08-12-2005, 09:06 PM
I Say You Rename This Painting!!!
Something Like................. "simply Beautiful" Sounds Good!! This Is Not Only Beautiful But Inspiring!!
I have too much Norwegian in me to self congratulate...I'm better at self degredation!!! :D I'm thankful though that someone else does it for me...Takk.

Bill Wray
08-13-2005, 01:29 AM
The best thing I can say is this looks old. Right out of a Sotheby's auction catalog of top early century landscape painters. Bravo.