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christyc82
08-03-2005, 12:27 PM
I ordered a frame for a painting that is 48x36 on canvas. The guy told me to order a 47 5/8 x 35 3/4 frame. I argued saying it was wrong but he assured me it would fit. Well he didnt measure right, the stretcher bars had warped some, and now the canvas wont fit. I dont have time to wait for another frame, so I want to just mount it on a hard backing. My question, is foam core good enough or should I go with something harder. Also, I know that oil paintings arent supposed to be mounted on boards to allow them to breathe, is the same true for acrylics? I need to get this thing off within a few days..so anyone who could help it'd be appriciated

Wayne Gaudon
08-03-2005, 01:13 PM
Foam core will dent so if someone leans something heavy on the canvas it could indent. As for breathing, to my kniwledge, there is nothing wrong with mounting an oil canvas on a board. :D As for acrylics, once dry they are dry and there is nothing wrong with mounting them either. There is a plastic board that has a fiber inner instead of just foam. It's at the hardware store as well. It won't indent and is as light but more costly. The name is Coroplast and it's easy to use. You can cut it with an exactor knife.
As for your framer .. ? Wow .. I know frames have a little leeway and you can drop a 16th if your are brave, but to drop a full 1/2 inch .. that is crazy.

christyc82
08-03-2005, 01:36 PM
Yeah he really ticked me off. I tried to just order a 48x36 but he wouldnt put it through, said I was wrong. So now I'm stuck w/ something that is either going to put me 2 weeks behind, or cost me more money. Im thinking I may just buy plywood, or something of the type. Ill have to check it out when I goto work tonight. Im crossing my fingers we have scrap pieces that I can buy for like $2 stead of putting a ton of money into this. I already have $250 into the frame itself.

Wayne Gaudon
08-03-2005, 01:43 PM
Look at mdf as I think it's the cheaper mount but it's heavy if you are shipping. Good luck.

Lady Carol
08-03-2005, 03:06 PM
I buy my frames from pictureframes.com

They are very cheap and you do the measuring and the ordering. No irritating man behind the counter telling you, you measured wrong. I would have asked form my money back, or not paid.

timelady
08-03-2005, 06:02 PM
I agree that something firmer would be better, even if you use a thinner board like the kind framers use as backing board (which I think is a kind of acid-free MDF). (and actually oil paintings are usually better off attached to a solid support)

I hope you seriously complain to the framing company!

Tina.

christyc82
08-03-2005, 11:49 PM
Yeah Im calling them tomorrow. I had to pay for it up front....so we'll see what happens.

As far as pictureframes.com I dont like that they are the particle board stuff....cheap lookin I think to give to clients...

al1234
08-04-2005, 09:33 AM
Hello Christy,
I own a frame company and am an artist with thirty years experience in both fields. I am sorry to say, but there are good and bad framers out there.

As for using Coroplast for a backing I can't recomend it. The corrugations in it could show through to your artwork once mounted.
Why don't you just have another framer custom make the stretcher to fit your new frame? That is if you can sacrifice some of the pictures edge.

It is my opinion that it is better to have a good quality stretcher than a mounting board. The reason is forgiveness in the frame. Once the work is mounted it permanent and humidity and environmental conditions can cause the adhesion to let go, resulting in air bubbles. Some framers hate to mount things. They even have a disclaimer on their invoices, which states they are not responsible for damages if the mounting goes wrong. Ask more questions of your framer the next time or email me and I will tell you if you are getting good advice.

The material I would use in this case, if you still want to mount it is known by the trade as Gator Board, it is tempered foam board and is rigid and will not bend or dent easily. Use 1/2" thickness for the size you mentioned, 3/36" is available and is okay for smaller works. If you do it yourself don't use spray glue or a very wet glue. There are archival neutral PH glues sold and they will release with water if you don't want the permanency. Otherwise, I use "Elmers" types of wood glue for canvas. Its adhesion is very good, but is not archival.

AL Razza
www.razzadesign.com

Einion
08-04-2005, 02:32 PM
I ordered a frame for a painting that is 48x36 on canvas. The guy told me to order a 47 5/8 x 35 3/4 frame. I argued saying it was wrong but he assured me it would fit. Well he didnt measure right, the stretcher bars had warped some, and now the canvas wont fit. I hope you're getting your money back :mad:

For the record generally you want a frame to be made to be larger than the nominal size, not smaller!

I dont have time to wait for another frame, so I want to just mount it on a hard backing. My question, is foam core good enough or should I go with something harder. Is this just to back the canvas stretched bars? In that case foam core should be fine.

Also, I know that oil paintings arent supposed to be mounted on boards to allow them to breathe...Not necessarily, some people paint on board directly after all :)

...is the same true for acrylics? You're fine if close up the back of the framing.

Einion