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View Full Version : Wet Panel Carrier cheap and fast to assemble...


Marc Hanson
07-20-2005, 03:11 PM
About to take a painting trip and like Brian C.( his panel carrier is great and what I'd make if time permitted), I needed something for larger 11x14 panels. I have several panel carriers for sizes up to 10x12 that I've made in the past, but not for 11x14 and larger. Because I've been so busy lately this had to be cheap, fast to make and light as possible. I don't know how long it will last but with less than $10.00 into it, one trip's worth of use is good enough.

This is made from one 20x30 piece of 1/2" foam core ($3.99 @ Michael's), and four 2 foot pieces of 1/4" basswood ($.67 each) from Michael's. I used cyanoacrylate ester glue(ie super glue) to attach the dividing strips. A short piece of hook and loop (Velcro) with self-adhesive made the 'latch.

Cut it to dimensions with 90 degree cuts (a good mat knife blade), measure, mark and glue the basswood strips, and tape the whole enchilada together. I used duck tape so that it would look like a 'Red Green' project :D ...can't beat duck tape for strength and appearance...and speed!

This carries 8 - 11x14 panels. The two outside couldn't be put in wet, but IF I used them all, I'd probably use a couple right away and they'd be dry enough by the time it came to pack up and go.

frisbee1948
07-20-2005, 04:29 PM
There is no problem so big that it can't be solved with either duct tape or flowers.

Have a safe trip.

antgeek
07-20-2005, 04:34 PM
cool beans, marc, quick and cheap. thanks for sharing your design. :wave:

Marc Hanson
07-20-2005, 04:35 PM
There is no problem so big that it can't be solved with either duct tape or flowers.

Have a safe trip.
I did it...I know that's the correct spelling... :rolleyes:

See you out there and a safe one to you as well John!

jimb
07-20-2005, 05:55 PM
Marc,
I have a dandy panel carrier made out of wood, but the only problem is that it only takes a 9x12 panel (which come to think of it is probably why I have only been painting on 9x12s :) ).
If I ever get brave enought to do something bigger I will surely use something like this.
Thanks!!

Bruce Newman
07-20-2005, 10:29 PM
You must be ready to go on your New York trip very soon, Marc. I'd LOVE to meet up with everyone there but I've got two daughters getting married in the next 5 weeks. Yikes!

Have a great trip!

brianc
07-21-2005, 12:06 AM
Excellent idea to glue in the strips of wood. Thanks for sharing.

tadpole
07-21-2005, 12:39 AM
Marc;

What a great idea! Cheap, fast, and a strong design! I love it. Call it Duct Tape, Gaffer's Tape, or Ordinance Tape it's the multipurpose choice.

frisbee1948
07-21-2005, 12:45 AM
Marc;

What a great idea! Cheap, fast, and a strong design! I love it. Call it Duct Tape, Gaffer's Tape, or Ordinance Tape it's the multipurpose choice.

It works quite well on ducks, too. :evil:

coh
07-21-2005, 12:57 AM
Excellent idea to glue in the strips of wood. Thanks for sharing.
It does work well. I recently made a couple of wet panel carriers completely
out of wood. On the first I chiseled out channels for the paintings (not fun)
and on the second I bought the wood strips and glued them in place (much
better). Two things to be aware of, though - first, it is tough to find wood
strips that are actually straight and true, at least in my experience - they
tend to be warped. Second, the strips have a tendency to "wander" when
clamped so they have to be braced carefully in place (maybe more of a
problem using wood glue than super glue?).

The idea to make the carrier primarily out of the cheap, light and easy to
cut foam core is a nice innovation though, thanks for sharing that idea Marc!

Related issue - since this will be my first long-distance painting trip I'm
wondering if anyone has any suggestions for things to bring that I might not
think of. I'm not talking obvious stuff like paint, brushes, etc but ancillary
stuff - such as brush cleaning soap, etc.

midcoast
07-21-2005, 02:27 PM
Marc -

Wonderful idea!!! Thanks! I LOVE duct tape...now I have yet another use for it :) Have fun on your trip!!!

Chris - depending on where you're going and how far away from stores: extra turps, extra trash bags, sunscreen and bug repellent, paper towels (I usually forget these), DUCT TAPE :) , and more panels than you think you'll need...if I think of more, I'll letcha know.

Nancy

mnpainter
07-21-2005, 07:24 PM
Cool!!!! I made a brush holder out of foam core, it is a very versitile material as well as the DUCT tape!!!! Hey have a good trip and hoping to major (oh yea!! as always) works in the return!!!!!

Ben

coh
07-21-2005, 11:51 PM
Chris - depending on where you're going and how far away from stores: extra turps, extra trash bags, sunscreen and bug repellent, paper towels (I usually forget these), DUCT TAPE :) , and more panels than you think you'll need...if I think of more, I'll letcha know.

Nancy

Thanks Nancy, the duct tape was one that I probably wouldn't have thought
of without this thread!

I did come up with something that I should have in the car anyway, but
didn't when I needed it yesterday - a first aid kit! I inadvertantly sliced my
hand open with a painting knife...didn't realize those things were so sharp!
Had to keep pressure on it for 10 minutes to stop the bleeding, and had
no cleaners or bandages to protect it afterwards.

Of course, the knife was loaded with paint at the time so I probably got
my lifetime requirement of titanium, cadmium, and who knows what else...

Shelley Grund
07-22-2005, 09:25 AM
:clap: Now this one I think I can do - no wood working skills required! I've printed out a copy of your instruction.... Someday I'll make a couple or so of various sizes. THANKS MARC - this is COOL :cool: !
Have a great time in NY :wave: - Can't wait to see pictures of you all and the work produced!

id-art
06-29-2006, 10:26 PM
Marc,

Thanks for a great idea. Had more 1/8" hardboard than 1/2" foamcore... Works amazing well!

JamieWG
07-01-2006, 11:59 AM
Bob, I'm so glad you've bumped this thread up. I've moved it to the Plein Air Hall of Fame...'Another one of Marc's great ideas.

Jamie

Donald_Smith
07-04-2006, 10:13 AM
If you want something a little more durable and almost as light, you can use gator board instead of foam board. I think instead of paper on the sides, they use something stronger.

Don

Anita Murphy
07-16-2006, 11:03 PM
Neat idea!!!

There is no problem so big that it can't be solved with either duct tape or flowers.

ROFL!

meatball2006
07-30-2006, 09:53 PM
GREAT JOB.
looks like another night of building again. just finished my modification of my
9"x13" mabef box into a pochade box with the help of brianc lemonhead and others. so i look forward to this project.
OH YEAH! I ALSO HAVE A DUCT POND IN MY BACKYARD

cunparis
06-04-2007, 05:13 PM
Marc,

Thanks for a great idea. Had more 1/8" hardboard than 1/2" foamcore... Works amazing well!

A couple questions:

How do you cut the hardboard? I've tried with my utility knives but it's difficult and dangerous. With a saw I never cut straight.

The weather here in Paris is finally getting nice and I'm eager to get out and paint. I've decided this summer I'm going to paint in oils instead of my usual acrylics. I paint oils with a knife and it's usually quite thick, which brings me to question #2:

If you paint up to the edges, don't they get messed up by the wood strips? Should I learn to leave a small edge around the painting?

Thanks to all for the great comments. Since the American sized panel holders don't work for French sizes, I'm going to try to build my own.

-Michael

id-art
06-04-2007, 07:04 PM
A couple questions:

How do you cut the hardboard? I've tried with my utility knives but it's difficult and dangerous. With a saw I never cut straight.

The weather here in Paris is finally getting nice and I'm eager to get out and paint. I've decided this summer I'm going to paint in oils instead of my usual acrylics. I paint oils with a knife and it's usually quite thick, which brings me to question #2:

If you paint up to the edges, don't they get messed up by the wood strips? Should I learn to leave a small edge around the painting?

Thanks to all for the great comments. Since the American sized panel holders don't work for French sizes, I'm going to try to build my own.

-Michael

Hi Michael,

The foamcore idea might be better for you. I used a table saw to cut the hardboard.

Yes, the edges could get messed up. I paint on 1/8" panel and left about 3/8" space. I could get two panels in there back to back. If I insert just one the edges seem to be not messed up. With my 12x16' carrier I tape gessoed canvas, up to 11x14", to a panel and the edges are well clear. Actually I've been using "removeable plastic adhesive" lately...like a sticky plastic clay product...one pinch on each corner. If the painting is a keeper you can mount and frame it.

Another way to think of it: Once framed the edges can not be seen so why worry?

Bob

cunparis
06-05-2007, 03:29 AM
Another way to think of it: Once framed the edges can not be seen so why worry?

Bob

As long as the widths of the edges of the frame & the carrier are the same then I agree! :)

brianc
06-15-2007, 09:14 AM
A couple questions:

How do you cut the hardboard? I've tried with my utility knives but it's difficult and dangerous. With a saw I never cut straight.

-MichaelMichael. Cutting hardboard with a utility knife takes patience, and a metal straight edge, like a metal ruler or square. I put a scrap piece of wood underneath, line up my heavy duty carpeters square (ruler) on the piece I want to cut, then carefully pull the knife along the ruler. You must press hard and cut several times to get through.

The two advantages of the knife: you don't need a table saw, and it cuts without a kerf. If you use a saw, it removes a small space of wood where the saw blade travels. This is often 1/8". Over the space of many canvasses cut from a large piece of wood, this causes spacing problems, and you lose a canvas or two.

Personally, I use a mix. I cut a 4x8' sheet into 9", 10", and 12" strips on the saw. Then I use a blade to cut the 48" strip into exact sizes with a blade. For example, that 9" strip becomes 4 exact 12" pieces. Using a saw for the same piece would leave each piece an 1/8" short, which might cause problems in a frame.

WatercolorPat
06-22-2007, 09:57 PM
Fabulous idea - I made one for myself today, and will be taking it with me to paint on Monhegan Island, Maine next week.

michaelson
10-22-2007, 07:31 AM
Heres something that you can do that might save you a lot of money and allow you to make a lot of paintings in a very efficient manner.

1. decide how big you want to work.
2. go out and buy or make a number of canvas stretchers that are about 3 inches taller and wider than that size. These can be made of the cheapest canvas and they can be left unprimed. I would suggest fredrick's stretchers and cheap unprimed cotton canvas.
3. buy some nice, primed linen canvas, or prime your own if you're into that. Cut the peices so that they are the same size as your canvas stretchers. Then use masking tape to tape off the area you want to work in leaving about a 1-1/2 inch border all the way around.
4. using about 8 thumbtacks, tack your painting canvases on top of the cheap canvas. Now stack your stretchers and bind them together. When you have finished painting, re-stack them. the painting won't touch the back of the other paintings. You will find that you can just hang the paintings up to dry by tacking them up somewhere at home. If you like one, stretch and frame it. If you don't like it, don't stretch it.
5. reuse the stretchers again and again.

I have been using this method all season.
Michaelson

WatercolorPat
10-22-2007, 08:03 PM
Just got your response. Another great idea. I used my wet-paint carrier all summer, and everyone thought it was terrific.

Jano
03-14-2009, 12:17 PM
bookmark

Shelley Grund
11-02-2009, 02:06 PM
Had to bring this back out of the cupboard to say - I MADE ONE!
EASY, EASY, EASY!
Thanks again to Marc!

b123
11-16-2009, 05:59 PM
If you want something a little more durable and almost as light, you can use gator board instead of foam board.

Don

Hi Don,
Yes I think that is a great suggestion of yours. I have had a lot of success with this gatorboard material. It is much less prone to bending than foamcore, and does not warp in the same way as do other lightweight materials such as mahogany plywood, luan (a tradename), other thin plywoods, or mdf (medium density fibreboard). All of the latter warp after time when they get wet.

I have made about a dozen of these gatoboard drying boxes in different sizes, as well as some palette carriers and they are still holding up after 6 years of fairly heavy use. I also dismantle them when flying and reassemble them on site (using duct tape of course!).

Here are the designs for the boxes I use:

(I settled on this design in the end after a lot of experiments because it contains the maximum number of panels in the minimum volume).

I hope these plans are useful for everyone,
all the best...
Barry
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2009/158506-three_panel_carrier1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2009/158506-three_panel_carrier2.jpg

Donald_Smith
08-31-2010, 11:26 PM
Barry,

It was from reading your Virtual Art Academy material that I learned about using the Gaterboard. I didn't think it would be right for me to share the section about making it. It is very nice of you to share it here on WC.

Don

plec
09-01-2010, 04:24 AM
thanks all some greast info here I will be making one of these.
Ken.

nzuriel
03-25-2012, 01:52 PM
thank you for sharing guys.. its very informative.

id-art
03-25-2012, 02:15 PM
Very light weight and durable box. This one is 6x8". The muslin was applied with acrylic gel plus a final coat.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Mar-2012/54863-wet_box-6x8_1.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Mar-2012/54863-wet_box-6x8_2.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Mar-2012/54863-wet_box-6x8_3.JPG

artgardn
05-17-2012, 12:39 AM
Great stuff.
I like the capacity for lots of work, but my own capacity varies a fair bit so I like the option of one-offs. You might find this funny but Dollarama sells "Bacon Boxes" (Like you need to house bacon? HMM?) which are shells of plastic that you can mount masonite panels in if you just want to paint one or two pics.
Not that I'm worried about weight on your gatorboard design! Brilliant.
New here; the first post I looked at was this which is an ongoing theme for me. Thanks!

Peg Taylor
08-11-2012, 01:24 AM
Love the idea! Are there more detailed instructions somewhere that I'm missing? I can't figure out how to get all the pieces out of a 20x30" panel! Thanks.

Peg Taylor
08-12-2012, 03:33 PM
I figured it out! :)

lithophotos
10-08-2012, 05:48 PM
Inspired I had a go. I wanted a small panel hoder for 18x24 cm panels as I like the Belle Arti ones that Jacksons sell - relatively cheaply in bulk. most panel boxes are in imperial size . I had a sheet of corrugated plastic left over from some I bought about 12 years ago to make a secure folder I needed for some very large (5 foot by 3 foot) photographs I had printed.
I was also looking for some suitable plastic channel and found this in B&Q a DIY store chain. It cost around $10, but now I have enough to make several boxes. The other materials needed are a small saw, hobby knife and duct tape as well as some contact adhesive.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Oct-2012/128223-wet_box_001.jpg

cut out, scored and channels glued in - (nearly got it right)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Oct-2012/128223-wet_box_002.jpg

folded and taped - inside view

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Oct-2012/128223-wet_box_003.jpg

rather clunky completed box, but small and light enough to fit in my day pack

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Oct-2012/128223-wet_box_004.jpg

many thanks to all who contributed to this thread

Robin :clap:

id-art
10-08-2012, 07:21 PM
Good idea! I made one similar from hardboard a couple years ago. It fell apart so I re-taped, gluing all joints this time. Much heavier than yours I imagine.

Jbyrd117
05-24-2013, 11:54 PM
Jim Serrett has a nice blog post on his website about making a nice wet panel carrier out of wood. I think you guys will appreciate this: http://www.pochadeboxpaintings.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-to-build-pochade-box-panel-carrier.html

His is made with pine and birch. It's more expensive than these lightweight versions but it's tough and beautiful!

Justin Mee
06-29-2014, 03:14 AM
this is a great post...size and material can change...

hayday77
07-06-2015, 02:44 PM
might I suggest, for those who really appreciate the value of duct tape, that before you slide your wet panels into the groove, stick of piece of duct tape to the back of the painting with some hanging out the top that you double over. this will serve as a handy pull tab to get your panels back out.

Mike L
07-27-2015, 10:04 AM
I did it...I know that's the correct spelling... :rolleyes:

See you out there and a safe one to you as well John!

There are two names for that type of scrim tape: duck and duct.

True duct tape is best suited for sealing joints in heating and ventilation ducts because it is designed to stand up the relatively high heat of the. "True" duct tape is more expensive than "duck" tape.

Duck tape was invented during WWII to patch up bullet holes in airplane fuselage's and wings to get the craft back in the air more quickly and efficiently than any other method. Duck (from Dutch doek) canvas was the scrim, or supporting structure for the adhesive and gave the tape a lot of strength. The original color was "army" green but, after the war was changed to the more familiar light gray.

Duck tape is also a brand of this type of tape, but somewhere along the line the two names became interchangeable. Just as acetylsalicylic acid is now known simply as aspirin, the only real difference is how you say it or spell it.

The tape seen in the photos is may or may not be Duck brand, but it can be spelled duck or duct.

Way more than you wanted to know, right? :lol:

R/Mike