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davidohodgson
07-17-2005, 05:20 AM
I was talking to the owner of an art and framing shop last week, here in Santa Rosa, CA. She told me that, in her experience, framed prints of artists' works on canvas-effect backings sell much more profitably than either prints on plain stock, or even original artwork. She sells several canvas-effect prints per week, versus only one or two original artworks per year. The canvas-effect prints can obviously be sold much more cheaply than original works, and they don't need glass in the frames. Therefore, I'm hoping that someone can recommend a company that can produce such prints, either from digital photographs or from original artwork, at reasonable rates. The size of my artworks varies from about 9"x12" to 20"x30". (If this question has already been answered elsewhere, I apologize. I did a search but couldn't find anything.) Thanks, Dave

Lady Rando
07-17-2005, 08:39 AM
Check out my site using my banner link.

laurali
07-17-2005, 09:10 AM
Hi David (I am on the other side of the bay, BTW :-)).

If you have digital files you can upload, I was very happy with the prints I got from http://finerworks.com They will print on unstretched canvas, with either a gloss or matte finish. You can also have them stretched. There is a calculator for the cost.

Laura

laurali
07-17-2005, 09:15 AM
I forgot to add...if you don't have good digital files and you need the printer to work with the original artwork, there are two wetcanvas partners that do that: Tamara and Artist Printshop at www.artistprintshop.com. I also used a small place runned by artists, Paul Duda gallery: www.paulduda.com All three produce good quality prints.

I wish I could find a local place to scan them. If I selected a piece to have prints made, I think highly of it and would rather keep it local.

Laura

surreal
07-17-2005, 09:32 AM
Laura,

Which tell me how to define "good digital files?"

I would love to know how to scan images as well as possible in order to have prints made from them.

Thank you.
:)

laurali
07-17-2005, 09:40 AM
Generally speaking, the higher the resolution, the better.

I asked for recommendations on scanners on another group. My impression is that the ones that do up to 8 1/2 x 11 are inexpensive and you can find some up to the task. Here are some of the ones recommended: Canoscan N650U, Epson Perfection 3170 Photo, Afga Scanwise.

One artist told me she picked up one of those (the canoscan, I think) for $25 on eBay and it works perfectly.

I have been looking into larger formats. The 11 x 17 models aren't horribly expensive and I could scan up to 11 x 14 canvases, which is a common size I paint.

Laura

surreal
07-17-2005, 09:53 AM
What resolution do you recommend, Laura?

:)

I have an Epson Perfection 2450 slide/film scanner that I think is excellent.

surreal
07-17-2005, 10:33 AM
I am referring to dpi's.
We usually scan for the internet at 72 dpi's I believe.
:)

Forgive my lack of techie know-how.
:o

laurali
07-17-2005, 12:25 PM
I am not an expert but this is my take on it...300 is recommended, if possible. I don't think higher than that is necessary and it is possible to get a good print lower than that (200 or even 150).

We are all so careful to do the very best images for prints, but I was reflecting on how some people made & successfully sold prints from images stolen off the web (poor quality) so maybe we are a little too hard on ourselves.

Laura

surreal
07-17-2005, 12:27 PM
Thanks for the info, Laura.
:)

gerbera
07-17-2005, 07:25 PM
I also had this problem some time ago and was looking for a scanner, to do my own scans of my larger paintings. But then I learned from a fellow artist, that this is not neccessary. It is possible, to scan your larger paintings in parts and it is EASY to put them together and nobody will see it. So I bought a good Cannon scanner for 8,5x11 formats (maybe 100 Dollars) and since this time I do always my own scans of all my paintings, small and all larger formats. If you have photoshop it is so easy. You scan part for part with 300 dpi, open a new file and then you have to copy all parts in this new file. You put all together and then you have to remove the "cut-line" with the eraser.
If you need more detailed explanation, just let me know and I will do this.
Of course it is a bit of work, but you safe a lot of money. And with a bit of practice, you will be very pleased about this. I am speaking here about my watercolors, which are on paper. Maybe there will be a problem, when you paint on stretched canvas. I did one scan of such a stretched canvas-painting, but of course it would be better, when the canvas would not be stretched. But this problem you will have with all scanners. With a good printer you can print them your own prints on high quality paper. You also can do your prints on canvas, but I don't know which printer you would need then. When you do your own scans on this way and with 300 dpi you always can give this file to a professional printer, who does giclees or so. And also you could send this image to a company, who makes slides, should you need them.
Doris

davidohodgson
07-17-2005, 09:00 PM
Thank you laurali and Lady Rando for your speedy suggestions. I'll check them out. However, I'd still appreciate further suggestions from other artists: cost is very definitely of the essence here!
As regards the discussion about scanning images, my own HP scanner is perfectly good for images up to about 9"x12". I have tried to "stitch" together larger images by sectional scanning, as suggested. The results were good enough for, say, eBay listings, but not good enough to produce an acceptable master for a print. There are various gotchas: the alignment of each section must be exactly the same, there must be no automatic color correction, etc. In fact, the automatic stitching software I tried to use produced such dreadful results that I found I could get better results doing it manually! I use Photoshop and Corel PhotoPaint, and neither produced a perfect result.

gerbera
07-18-2005, 04:35 AM
I only can say, it is possible, to get highquality scans as you would get them from other professional printers. Maybe you are not confident enough with Photoshop or so and you don't excactly know, how it will work, but it is worth to try this out. I got these tips from a fellow artist, who has a lot of experiences with this and he also said, that his gallery-owner would never see a different between the original and his own produced scans and prints.

Lady Rando
07-18-2005, 07:37 AM
If you are uncomfortable with stitching the pieces together you could always send the files on cd to your printer. We use a program that lets us stitch at the pixel level and adjusts for the slight differences each scanned section will have. I've scanned paintings as large as 38x46. We scanned it in 16 sections and stitched it together without any problems. It can be a lot of work but the artists we print the larger giclee's for love the results.

Scan at 300 dpi with no corrections on it. Also, if you can provide your printer with a small sample print or an 8x10 photo that you feel matches your colors, all the better. It makes it easier to produce a print that matches the original. Without that, no printer can guarentee a good match.