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View Full Version : What printmaking papers do you like?


TikiTorch
07-17-2005, 12:46 AM
Wondering what types of papers everyone is fond of... particularly the relief printmakers. But really if you care to describe any printmaking paper that you like that would be great. Has anyone tried the Blick Masterprinter paper?
Thanks,
Lee

benfish
07-17-2005, 08:50 AM
My favorite paper for relief printing is japanese mulberry. I will use Arches 88 in a pinch. Because I do a fair amount of book making with my prints I also use mohawk and occasionally (I know it sounds weird, but it really works in the context of soft book covers) kraft paper.

intaglio and monoprint - my absolute favorite paper is murillo. I can get it in decently large sizes and it deckels very nicely. It's responsive enough to pick up very slight mezzotints, yet tough enough that you can really beat up on it.

For proofs I use dolphin, (dolfin? I buy it off someone else and have never seen it written) because it's cheap. In a pinch I've used a few different weight of rives bfk paper as well.

Lastly, I've done a decent amount of 3d prints (i.e. making a triangular plate, printing it 4 times and making a pyramid) and for that I'll print on this wonderful stiff watercolor paper that arches makes with loads of starch in it.

Sunfilly
07-17-2005, 04:20 PM
For relief prints I like mulberyy, rice paper, I've used arches and lennox as well. For my proofs I like to use the same paper I'm printing on, as if they do not come out so well I can use them in collages. I usally do not have to do too many proofs in this medium.

For screen printing I love lennox the best, it has a nice smooth surface. I usally don't do any proofs in this medium, I just call the few that don't come out perfectly a proof.

For intaglio I use arches, bfk, and thick mulberry paper holds up pretty well. For my proofs I like to use watercolor paper. I tend to make more proofs in this medium, also sometimes I play around with color veriations, I think I do too many proofs LOL!!!! Somebody stop me please, I have more proofs then editions on some of my etchings, and I do not know what to do with them, its pretty much out of control.

bridog
07-17-2005, 07:10 PM
For good proofs I use a Stonehedge made printing paper
for rough proofs I use cheap coverstock that can moistoned
for final prints then I have tried a variety of papers, I love Johannot printmaking paper
also for blockprinting by hand a finely misted Masa rice paper delivers pretty good results
I just bought a pkg. of some Speedball Printmaster paper, so far it has proven good with water based ink printed on it, have not tried printing in oil on it yet

Brian

ps. I am also interested in making my own hand made paper with cotton linters and other fibres and try embossing/printing
I have tried birchbark as well...it should be soaked well a bit beforehand if it is going to go through a press
you have to peel back the layers of the bark to a thinner sheet constistency

Sunfilly
07-17-2005, 11:52 PM
ps. I am also interested in making my own hand made paper with cotton linters and other fibres and try embossing/printing
I have tried birchbark as well...it should be soaked well a bit beforehand if it is going to go through a press
you have to peel back the layers of the bark to a thinner sheet constistency

Brian,
Birchbark that is pretty interesting. Can you tell us more on this.

I also want to make my own paper. A little tip for those who make, or want to make their own paper, the local laundry mats can be your best friends, they collect the lint from all the dryers, it is all mostly 100% cotton, and trash to them. Tell them to put is aside for you to pick up. They collect tons of it daily, it can save you a lot of money on buying cotton linters.

Jetsam
07-17-2005, 11:52 PM
When I am not going for a less expensive or lower quality paper for experiments and proofing, my favorite would be Fabriano Tiepolo for editioning most intaglios. For drypoint I also like Magnani Pescia - it is soft and picks up the fuzzy lines of drypoint beautifully.

Printmakerguy
07-18-2005, 10:47 PM
I have used a LOT of different papers- and have some definate favorites, depending on what I am doing.

The Blick masterprinter is OK stuff, but I dont use it for anything but proofing. It is kind of light.

For my editions, I use Stonehenge, Rives BFK, or Manani Pescia. The Pescia is my favorite, but it is a little expensive, so I tend to use it only for my 'nicer' final work. I was lucky to pick up several hundred sheets of it a a GARAGE SALE of all places.

The Rives is good stuff, too- I have a 46" wide roll of it that I got for a few bucks (another chance bargain!)... It is great stuff. Stonehenge is nice as well, and comes in nice colors.

Some of my work looks better (and prints better) on a lighter paper. I use a lot of japanese papers, the mulberries are great and stand up to all sorts of 'abuse' when you are printing with it, despite it's fragile look. I also have been known to use the Unryu (sp?) papers, which add some texture to the prints...

If I want a colored paper, I usually use Hahnemühle Ingres, Fabriano Roma, or similar. All are availible from Dick Blick- http://www.dickblick.com/categories/printmakingpapers/

Best advice- Buy an assortment, and TRY them- You never know until you try one how it is going to work for you... Some people I know HATE papers that I love!

-Andrew

Diane Cutter
07-19-2005, 10:22 AM
The recent stash of papers have been Arches 88 (great with monotypes using Akua-Kolors), Fabriano Uno rough watercolor paper (I like the thickness, but can only use it with a press), and Rives BFK.

I keep meaning to try others but since everything has to get shipped down here, I keep going with my old favorites...

Diane

drowningcreek
07-21-2005, 02:18 PM
http://www.mrfrench.com is a wonderful archival paper used by many screen print artists. Beautiful selection of colors, too. I think you can get swatch books by contacting them; not sure if they charge for them. Shop at home, and have it delivered!

TikiTorch
07-21-2005, 03:12 PM
Thanks all for responding. I like Rives BFK white and Arches Cover for etchings but I'm unsure about a relief paper. Something white, smooth enough for hand printing, and nice enough to run an edition with a press also..

Any suggestions?

Lee

Printmakerguy
07-21-2005, 07:09 PM
I like Rives BFK white and Arches Cover for etchings but I'm unsure about a relief paper.Any suggestions?


Both work exceptionally well for relief printing as well! I haven't used arches cover much, but I know that with BFK I like to wet it when I print... My exchange print was on BFK...

-Andrew

Ari Sutton
07-21-2005, 11:30 PM
I am fond of the Rives BFK and Rives lightweight papers. Some of the Japanese papers like Kitikata (sp?) are also nice. Utrecht has a good quality, less expensive printmaking papers that hold up well for relief prints.

Ari

Sunfilly
07-23-2005, 03:08 PM
Thanks all for responding. I like Rives BFK white and Arches Cover for etchings but I'm unsure about a relief paper. Something white, smooth enough for hand printing, and nice enough to run an edition with a press also..

Any suggestions?

Lee

Lee,
both those papers are good for relief printing, but if you are looking for some good paper that is less expensive you can try lenox paper, it is a nice weight paper, has a nice smooth surface, and it is very white, and you can use it wet or dry. Technically it is a drawing paper but a lot of people use it for silkscreen work, offset lithography, etching and embossing, you will find it at dick blick in the drawing paper section. You can try Strathmore and Stonehenge papers too. Coventry Rag Paper is a good paper too for printmaking.

Drawing papers can be very nice as, since they are for drawing they usually have a very smooth surface, and a lot of them come in a nice heavy weight.

If you like texture I have used pastel papers because I had some laying around, they where great for block printing and come in some nice colors. You can use any side of the paper.

sassybird
07-25-2005, 03:22 PM
I am pretty much an intaglio printer, and I love Somerset. BFK I use occassionally, but Somerset gives me that rich look I want.

TikiTorch
07-25-2005, 10:43 PM
Thanks guys..
Thanks Deborah for taking the time to write so much info. I'll be checking into the Lenox and expiramenting with other drawing papers.
Nice to hear from you Sassybird!
Lee

leoisillon
12-20-2005, 08:08 PM
For relief I like Arches Cover or Textwove, Rives BFK is also good. I've used Magnia Pescia before and Somerset for intaligo printing as well.

mLee
12-20-2005, 08:49 PM
I have used Blick Masterpaper and it is not quality. The worst thing is that I have this one print that I *really* like on that paper. It was supposed to be a junk print but it turned out really well. I will never use that paper again. I don't like the texture, the white color and I am not sure if it is archival.

I use mulberry, kozo and rives lightweight. I am always trying new papers since a supply store near me carries some good ones.

dragoni689
12-20-2005, 10:49 PM
BFK seems like the every-printers choice- not bad for an all around paper. If I'm in a pinch, that's maybe the paper i'll turn to for relief.

When producing lithographs, if I can afford it, I prefer Somerset Velvet.
However, I very rarely use paper in it's raw state when I am printing lithography. I usually like to stretch or surface the paper- I find I can acquire a better impression if I soften the face of the paper before printing.

For this reason, I like to Calender Somerset velvet in it's bright white and cream colours the most. It's a softer paper with a rhobust texture when un-calendered, softer than BFK by far- much less sizing.
After calendering it between 2 sheets of plexiglass on a Guillotine litho press (I use a tackach-garfield with a 38X60" bed, thats what we have in our shop), the surface becomes so plate finished that it's almost like printing on bristol board. Believe me, when doing waterless plate lithography, a plate finish comes in very handy.

Out of the Japanese papers, I prefer Kitikata styled bark paper. It's got a warm colour and the surface accepts in really well, especially when doing an intaglio print. Cant beat it for Chin-Colle'. For intaglio, I prefer double-soaked Somerset Velvet. I soak it once for a few hours and then dry it overnight between sheets of davy's board, then come back the next day and dunk the sheets individually again, making what is referred to as a "damp pack"- or a bunch of soaked papers lain overtop each other in a plastic bag.
Pre-soaking and drying the paper makes it softer, and can result in a much better impression when printing with adaquate pressure.
I guess I'm not so particular with the type of paper, just the paper prep....

H2O_Baby
12-20-2005, 11:47 PM
Arches 88 is good for working dry. That's not for intaglio, but for monotype or relief.

I like Rives BFK, Arches Cover for most things.Various thin specialty papers, especially the Japanese ones for printing on to make a work using Chine Colle.

duckie
12-22-2005, 11:59 AM
I prefer japanese paper above all - I am currently using Shushoku 65g - which is fairly reasonable and fits my style of work. I also like Hakubai and Hosho - but they both give a different "feel" to the finished image than the Shushoku.
The rest of the japanese papers that I really like are too expensive to even consider - when I am rich an famous perhaps...

I have tried arches 88, BFK rives, textwove, fabriano etc - but they where not for me - hated them all actually ;)

Printmakerguy
12-22-2005, 02:05 PM
Japanese papers are great- But, You are right about the price... I have a drawer full of them, various types, but I am scared to use them- They look SO nice just as they are!! :)

-Andrew