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AmyH
01-02-2002, 02:21 AM
i really find digital art lacking. that said; here is some of mine. I only make this stuff as pre painting stimuli.

domsanto
01-02-2002, 02:36 AM
I find viewing digital art to be boring. That said, I like this one.

AmyH
01-02-2002, 03:46 AM
guess I sound insulting, sorry. I need to *know* there is something out there beyond the screen. transistors on silicone, magnetic data, whatever it is, is not enough for me. its too cold. dirt, bones, warm breath, cool skin, insect bites...got to have it.

las vegas bums me out

mame
01-02-2002, 08:35 AM
The legs and feet and shadow thrown by the chair are really working here. I think the facial features could use a little more attention as the eye stays fixed on the toenails and has no where else to go. Anatomically, not sure the torso is quite that short, given the length of the legs and height of the figure overall

Color relationships show a sure understanding.

ditch the dog.

kelly
01-02-2002, 10:34 AM
I really like your paintings. ;)

colorme
01-02-2002, 10:48 AM
hey amy :D im not into digital art that much, but i can live w/ yours.

dnip24
01-02-2002, 12:52 PM
Beautiful picture AmyH:)

AmyH
01-02-2002, 05:19 PM
thank you freaky people :)

amy

Cabal
01-05-2002, 01:51 AM
Hey check out this artist
Allesandro Bavari http://www.alessandrobavari.com/

then tell me digital art is "lacking"

domsanto
01-05-2002, 02:11 AM
Originally posted by Cabal
Hey check out this artist
Allesandro Bavari http://www.alessandrobavari.com/

then tell me digital art is "lacking"

Not too shabby

AmyH
01-05-2002, 03:48 AM
Originally posted by Cabal
Hey check out this artist
Allesandro Bavari http://www.alessandrobavari.com/

then tell me digital art is "lacking"

digital art is lacking to me personally :). didnt say it aint art, didnt say it aint good. its lacking something, for me. no big deal.

amy

AmyH
01-05-2002, 03:57 AM
closer to photo manipulation than pure digital art. I was aiming more at purely digital.

I also prefer a painting to a photograph. just something more human to it. just to clarify. like the diff between hand wrought (sp)metal and plastic, or something (bad analogy I know) . talking physical substance, not image quality.

amy

SanDL
01-09-2002, 06:00 PM
I have seen beautiful imagery in digital art but personally it always lacks the "hand" feel. I want to see, feel, and maybe even touch the gesture, I want to see evidence of the artist's physical being. And, hoping not to sound like a new-age groupie...I think and feel that direct contact to the surface has palpable energy. I always miss that in digital art.

Painted Melody
01-09-2002, 06:10 PM
I thought I was the only one who fooled around on the comp to ignite something for traditional painting...cool

to me, the digital art lacks the tactile pleasure of globs of paint (mmm) but there are those like Craig Mullens (http://www.goodbrush.com/hirez_pgs/bond/alpine_office.htm) who take to the medium full force

Mullens @ http://www.goodbrush.com/

Jeremy

AmyH
01-09-2002, 07:48 PM
hey,

see I look at that work and think it is terrible it is only digital.

flame me for saying "only" :D

paint blobs, human hand, all of that. how long before a puter program can simulate these works with out human interaction at all, just hit one button. see to me the art here is in the program used to build the image, maybe even more :eek:. so who is the artist??

amy

Jan-Michael
01-09-2002, 08:16 PM
AmyH...you disappoint me.. was this thread just to attack digital art... I love your comment about pushing a button...LOL well if you ever find that program let me know...:) I see so much ignorance here... I will post an image....
I see from this image that your digital skills are very basic... and sure as they expand you will learn to express yourself beyond the transistors... this is a good beginners image I have seen worse for sure...

AmyH
01-09-2002, 10:32 PM
no jan,

my intent is not, and was not, to bash digital art. I understand that the skills involved to render digital imagery are the same to render non digital art in many ways; as far as judging contrast, composition, continuity etc. HOWEVER, materials (paint) behave in an entirely different way than digital,a nd are controlled differently.

what i mean by a program that makes the painting is that; glazing an entire area in a veil of red using paint, is a skill that takes a long time (I am unable to do it) yet, I can cover an area on a computer pic with a veil of red at any percentage I want no problem.

try drawing a perfect circle with your pencil on a sheet of paper, now try to draw a perfect circle on the puter. :)

now I understand there are artists with tablets using thier handskills, but lets face it, it IS different. I hold actual hands on painting in higher esteem, not because it takes any less intelligence, or any less skill, but because it takes different skills. skills I am more impressed with, sorry.

In the end, I think we are comparing apples to oranges. think of it this way; if I try to make a water color of a photo using, well, real watercolor, then, I scan the pic and use a water color filter, part of the skill (or all of it imo) belongs to the programmer who created the code that turns my scanned photo into a "watercolor".

anyhow...hope we can agree to disagree.

amy

lori
01-10-2002, 06:26 AM
okay, so now i'm following what all the hubbub was about.

:rolleyes:

okay...slot.

like the title. very linear.

as a work of art, i feel this needs something, LIKE PAINT!

seriously though, i read on the general critique forum another post by jan that he was upset by a comment by henrik too. i think he feels a little beat up(?) about digital art, not sure why...its all subjective.

digital art and painting are two VERY different things, what is the big deal anyway?

either you produce a SUCCESSFUL work of art or you don't, doesn't matter what the medium is...IMHO.

SLOT...love the title.

lori
01-10-2002, 06:29 AM
did i say i love the title?????


SLOT

JeffG
01-10-2002, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by AmyH
...paint blobs, human hand, all of that. how long before a puter program can simulate these works with out human interaction at all, just hit one button. ...
amy

That's what I think sounded the death knell for spin-art. It all came down to fancier and fancier turntables, getting a higher RPM than the next guy... the work lost its soul. Just sucked the life out of that movement. It wasn't pretty and I'm glad I got out of that and back into crayons.

I understand you're not bashing digi-art, just saying you just can't get into it. Me too, I appreciate the skill and understand many of the considerations are the same for digi vs. real, but I too need an actual object as a result. I don't even think its the inherent "perfection" of the image that bothers me either. When it comes to abstract sculpture, I can appreciate a gleaming "machine made" look of an aluminum piece just as much as a hand-hewn look of wood or cast bronze. So what gives? Tis a puzzlement.

What I really don't get (along with cilantro) are monoprints.... never will, I'm afraid.

hlee
01-10-2002, 06:37 PM
slot is just the word for it... lovely colour gradations...lines that also form columns, giving it a simple but crisp look :cool: ... though i seem to be at a loss on the right - bit too light to balance... since having balance here is a good idea, to match the overall neat, generally comfortable composition... well, this bit doesn't mean anything if you're not concerned with balance :D ...

a comment on the digi-art debate... both painting and digi-art certainly have their advantages (and disadvantages)... digi-art's kinda convenient for way-cool effect simulations that's much harder to do w/ real painting (what if you messed up?!), but painting gives a larger sense of satisfaction and accomplishment for a lotta people (especially humble painters like me trying to make things work). thing is, some people often question the integrity of a digi-artist, just because their work seems simple (they're not). others are a bit skeptical because it looks too machine-like sometimes, and on a personal level they might prefer the warm, humane feel that paintings evoke. either way, there're both great to experiment with... hope all you rockin' digi-artists out here won't be so upset :)

Jan-Michael
01-10-2002, 07:21 PM
I want everyone to know I am NOT mad at AmyH and hope she is not mad at me... it was a heated discussion... :) But I still admire her traditional work alot... I hope she knows that... I guess we can all feel protective of what we feel strongly about... :)

oh since others posted links here is one of my favorite digital artists...a priest from South America
Guillermo Vidal (http://www.gevidal.com.ar/iwebdocses/index.htm) go to catalogue for his galleries...
I asked him to join WC...but guess he has been to busy...:(

domsanto
01-10-2002, 08:34 PM
Originally posted by domsanto
I find viewing digital art to be boring.

Hey, I disparaged digital art, where is my browbeating? I'm beginning to think you people don't like me. I DEMAND A BROWBEATING!


Not only did I refer to myself in the third person, but I also included a quote from myself. I'M OUT OF CONTROL!

lori
01-10-2002, 10:24 PM
dom...

we are so used to your rants that we ALL decided to let you be. wasn't worth the time...lol

feeling paranoid yet????

:D

mame
01-10-2002, 10:27 PM
We're ignoring you until you contribute something useful to society.

domsanto
01-10-2002, 11:27 PM
Another successful attempt at steering a thread towards my favorite topic, ME!

My work is done here.

jnet11
01-11-2002, 12:43 PM
Originally posted by AmyH
glazing an entire area in a veil of red using paint, is a skill that takes a long time (I am unable to do it)

tangent alert:

I have avoided glazing in my paintings because any depth or subtelty that was there is lost as soon as I glaze. I, of course, attributed it to glazing itself, not me (lol). seriously, amy, I would appreciate your (or anyone's) ramblings on what does or doesn't work in your experience with glazing, and why. do you use it at all?

as to this piece, I find it to be much better than most of the 'abstract' digital pieces I've seen. Including jan's posted for amy. The layering of colors is what separates it, IMO, knowing what colors work together and how to create a focal point is something that no program can do yet (to my knowledge) and those are exactly the aspects that make this one stand out. and ...

I LOVE THE TITLE.

AmyH
01-11-2002, 01:08 PM
Originally posted by jnet11


tangent alert:

I have avoided glazing in my paintings because any depth or subtelty that was there is lost as soon as I glaze. I, of course, attributed it to glazing itself, not me (lol). seriously, amy, I would appreciate your (or anyone's) ramblings on what does or doesn't work in your experience with glazing, and why. do you use it at all?

as to this piece, I find it to be much better than most of the 'abstract' digital pieces I've seen. Including jan's posted for amy. The layering of colors is what separates it, IMO, knowing what colors work together and how to create a focal point is something that no program can do yet (to my knowledge) and those are exactly the aspects that make this one stand out. and ...

I LOVE THE TITLE.

hey j*

I do not (can not) glaze in oil. It is very difficult and I am just not good enough at it (through moslty lack of trying). was alway easier for me to glaze using acrylic. skill thing imo. I see, via studio products reading, glazing using as little medium as possible, and using fingers and pads of the palm of your hand, evens out glazing to make it smooth and excess paint. not tried that yet. thingking about it. anyone tried it? makes sense.

titles lol!! well, Im a stickler for em. if I dont get one that enhances the piece (yes I think this is possible) or at least does not detract (yes I think this is also possible, give me my just due please, spankings prefered ;) ) I won't title a piece. there are nuetral ones like "portrait of so and so" and ones that just work, for who knows what reason. sometimes i title them and three months down the line the real title comes to mind, go figure.

amy

lori
01-11-2002, 02:18 PM
TANGENT ALERT 2:


i agree about titles...they sometimes take some time to come into play, but then generally that is when i FINALLY understand why i painted what i did. funny how that works sometimes.

as for glazing, i do it ALOT. i mostly use the technique of rubbing out pure pigment. although i have a whole series of paintings with drippy glazes of pigment mixed into the varnish for the last layers. they come out like colored glass. i like this technique and use it when needed.

glazing is really easy though, i don't know why you two ACCOMPLISHED AWESOME PAINTING CHICKS are having a hard time with it! maybe because there is too much information on how to do it "correctly". well my advice is the same as that sweet goddess of victory NIKE says....just do it!

AmyH
01-11-2002, 02:27 PM
reply to tangent, cause its just more interesting, alert!

lori, so you just use pigment right from the tube? honestly been years since I attmepted to glaze. some experimentation is in order no doubt!

amy

lori
01-11-2002, 04:03 PM
Originally posted by AmyH
reply to tangent, cause its just more interesting, alert!

lori, so you just use pigment right from the tube? honestly been years since I attmepted to glaze. some experimentation is in order no doubt!

amy

yeah, well and mixed pigments too. but specifically...no medium. i use a dry brush approach (scumbling), my fingers, a rag, etc. depending on the need, then i rub with my hand or rag. of course i generally work large and have the space to do this type of unexact glazing, but it can be used for smaller work, using the scumbling technique and then rubbing. i like the results, they work for me, and the build up of glazes is amazing. the only medium i generally use, for other techniques is damar, terp, linseed, stand oil mix...but i use it very rarely because my painting style is more condusive to the first technique that i described.

mame
01-11-2002, 04:52 PM
dom's gonna be mad cuz it's not all about him any more but I am also interested in your technique.

A little more, please re alternating glaze colors? just transparent colors? warm over warm? or cool over cool? or?

Give it up, girl. Got a visual?

ZOTMA
01-11-2002, 05:07 PM
yeah, I'm interested too
though I've done a rub (technique) that sounds similar
nuttin like those luminous layers, eh?

reynolds
09-20-2005, 12:41 AM
:wave: