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Angie Reed Garner
06-16-2005, 07:50 PM
I saw pyrography popped up so here is a work of mine from a couple years ago-- I did a series of similar works.

Saint Feather-Light-and-Cat-Footed
oil on plywood with pyrographic lines
14" x 12" including framing element (part of the work)

Details here:

http://www.angiereedgarner.com/featherlight.htm

I never quite streamlined my process on these-- I wanted the wood primed before I painted on it, so first I did the pyrography, then painfully applied gesso in between the burnt lines, then painted. Le sigh.

seejay
06-16-2005, 10:41 PM
This looks interesting - could be a new version of Snakes and Ladders.

I imagine it was a pain avoiding the lines. It's hard to see in the posted image, but I assume the result is quite different to just painting the lines, and therefore worth the effort. Looks good.

Cheers

idylbrush
06-16-2005, 10:50 PM
Like it......love the nearly egg and arrow framing and the imagery is great. What fun.

Angie Reed Garner
06-16-2005, 11:08 PM
Thank you both! The whole series riffed on the game of chutes and ladders. They are very tactile in person and the lines appear engraved although people don't know how they were done unless I explain. The angled detail shots on the link maybe show a little, but not really.

Angie Reed Garner
06-16-2005, 11:11 PM
Maybe this shot will help...

seejay
06-17-2005, 12:25 AM
I see those lines now, a very nice effect indeedy. Thanks for the angled pic.

Cheers

Penny220
06-24-2005, 08:47 AM
Wow, this was allot of work! Thanks for sharing.

Lynn Quinn
06-24-2005, 10:10 AM
Hi Angie,
Our art club had a pyrographer as a member a few years ago. He told us about some artists doing the pyrography after doing oils, and how dangerous that was! I'm really glad you did it first, even if it was a pain to paint after. At least you weren't breathing dangerous fumes! Very colourful piece. Wondering about symbolism?
Lynn

Angie Reed Garner
06-24-2005, 10:24 AM
Hi Angie,
Our art club had a pyrographer as a member a few years ago. He told us about some artists doing the pyrography after doing oils, and how dangerous that was! I'm really glad you did it first, even if it was a pain to paint after. At least you weren't breathing dangerous fumes! Very colourful piece. Wondering about symbolism?
Lynn

I did a small study in which I put gesso on the panel and then burned it, and even with good ventilation decided that was just more than I was willing to risk for art! Burning hair smelled better. And one of the things I love about pyrography is the smell of the burning wood.

About the symbolism. This whole series began with the child's board game Chutes and Ladders. It is a version of an older game, Snakes and Ladders, and it is designed to teach small children right and wrong. On a chutes square (if you land on it, you go back) would be a little picture of a child doing something bad, like a little boy pulling a girl's pigtail. On a ladder square would be a child doing something good, allowing him to climb the ladder, skip ahead many spaces, and come closer to winning.

The game has some problems-- children LOVE to slide, and small children rarely attach any value to WINNING a board game (they are in it for the experience of interaction with others). So the metaphor for doing wrong was inherently attractive to little children, as it involved sliding AND making the game itself last longer. Oh, and climbing is scary for many young ones-- while some kids like to climb up high, most really get up past a certain point and decide they are ready to come down.

So the whole board game began a way to think about how strange some of the ideas about right and wrong are in our culture. In this particular painting, I was imagining someone (a "saint") whose balance was not threatened by these strange ideas-- she relies on an internal sense of up/down/right/wrong.