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sdfpipsd
12-29-2001, 07:55 PM
"Rockgarden" digital photograph (1600 px by 1400px)

ThinkSeeDraw
12-30-2001, 10:05 AM
You got a background..... Now what???

I would like it as a piece if it had some more color to it. It looks too dull. It's cool cuz it looks more painty like than it does a photo.

sdfpipsd
12-30-2001, 12:01 PM
Originally posted by strawberrrie
You got a background..... Now what???

I would like it as a piece if it had some more color to it. It looks too dull. It's cool cuz it looks more painty like than it does a photo.

I have a self-contained entity which befuddles attempts to project a narrative onto it. I have a thing which is its own thing. It is not a story and does not want to be a story. It is autonomous. Were I to add color it would be a different thing altogether.

sandge
12-30-2001, 12:08 PM
Quite right. It doesn't need anything else.

It is a sort of colour field with texture.

sdfpipsd
12-30-2001, 03:34 PM
..

sdfpipsd
12-30-2001, 03:35 PM
..

colorme
12-30-2001, 06:41 PM
excellent, post some more :)

reynolds
12-30-2001, 08:00 PM
i like the yummy green and zoomy orange one...

dnip24
12-30-2001, 09:04 PM
coool!:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

timelady
12-31-2001, 02:38 PM
I really like the first one, and the green one. I find that kind of photography of the joy of texture alone fascinating. Do post more. Tell us more about your feelings of it too, or how the subject drew you to it maybe?

Tina.

sdfpipsd
01-01-2002, 09:25 PM
Originally posted by timelady
I really like the first one, and the green one. I find that kind of photography of the joy of texture alone fascinating. Do post more. Tell us more about your feelings of it too, or how the subject drew you to it maybe?

Tina.

They are photo resource pic's for future paintings and other works. The only adjustments made to them have been the typical tweaking of color and contrast one would expect from a photolab, no tricky filters or cropping. The choice of subject matter is based around creating images which I may wish to paint or otherwise make manifest in one fashion or another. Sometimes I shoot objects or scenes which I specifically think would make for interesting images or contain elements I may wish to incorporate into another work. The first and third images are examples of this approach. Other times I subject the camera to lighting and focus situations which it is not designed to handle in the hopes of creating interesting effects which may give me imagery worth painting, etc.. The second image would be an example of this approach. Other times I just point the camera in a random direction and press the button to see what comes of it. I am very fond of my camera, but it is incapable of reliabley taking macrophotographic images of a quality suitable for professional printed reproduction, so most of my digital photos will not represent finished works.

domsanto
01-01-2002, 10:47 PM
"Rockgarden" is similiar in content to something I have been thinking about doing recently. It reminds me of the work of watercolorist Lynn McLain.

http://www.artistsmagazine.com/images/articleart_large/tam_jan02_mclain2.jpg

http://www.artistsmagazine.com/images/articleart_large/tam_jan02_mclain5.jpg

AmyH
01-01-2002, 10:47 PM
fond of the first, not of the 2nd, the third is enjoyable. I like medical and scientific photography, so I am biased.

AmyH
01-01-2002, 10:48 PM
lol dom 7:47

amy

domsanto
01-01-2002, 11:01 PM
747 synchronicity? ....Twilight Zone

sdfpipsd
01-02-2002, 12:54 AM
I am thinking.

sdfpipsd
01-02-2002, 02:22 PM
RE: Any and all comp's past, present, and future: Thank you, I am glad you enjoyed the work, or at least some element thereof.

Dom: I like this one http://www.artistsmagazine.com/imag...n02_mclain5.jpg . The thing I really like about this image is the representation of the paint. I like the painting of the paint looks painty. I like paint.

Amy: I think the red image would be amazing as an actualized work. In my mind's eye I see it as an eight foot by ten foot sheet of three or four inch thick red glass of varying degrees opaqueness with a thin sheen of water passing uniformly over the surface and evenly lit from behind. Perhaps it would even be wild to wire a thermostat to the lighting system in such a way that as the room temperature rises the light becomes more bright.

Since this idea I will probably never be able to afford in several lifetimes I see no harm in sharing it. Mum's the word on the final treatments for the first and third images for now.


(I was trying to take photos of some paintings today but they are all varnished and the sheen is causing me great trouble. I will experiment with different hours of the day and shooting indoors with cheesecloth between the lighting and image. I will not be going out to buy a diffuser even though the urge is rising! :) )

sdfpipsd
01-02-2002, 02:45 PM
Add on to second image's treatment: What if the thermostat not only increased the light intensity coming from the work but also functioned as a dimmer for the rest of the room's lighting!? As the area heated up the work would become brighter as the room grew darker, creating a more dramatic contrast, reinforcing the work's dominance of the environment, highlighting the sensation of warmth in the room, and being altogether ominous. That would be a trip and a half. :)

sdfpipsd
01-02-2002, 02:52 PM
Still more: The whole room is soundproofed and black. Microphones and high-end speakers are placed strategically about the room. The microphones run through a powerful computer which analyzes the sound frequencies and then plays back the inverted wave which will almost cancel out any sound made in the room and almost all of the room atmosphere sound (or room noise). As the temperature increases the counter signal is also increased until it eventually reaches the exact volume of the room creating a near dead silence.

mame
01-02-2002, 03:17 PM
You might be interested in looking at Jack Dollhaussen's work.

Really misses via cyberspace but the following will give you an idea:

http://www.wsu.edu/~jackdoll/

Jack Dollhausen: A 30 Year Start
December 14, 2001 – February 17, 2002 (this is from the catalogue, Boise Art Museum Exhibit, Boise, Idaho

This retrospective exhibition of Washington artist Jack Dollhausen features approximately 26 electronic sculptures. Created from 1970 to the present, these sculptures convert the normal functions of electricity into ornate statements of musical and interactive complexity. Internationally recognized, Dollhausen’s work has been shown throughout the United States and Europe. Currently, Dollhausen is a professor of art at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington.
Organized by the Boise Art Museum in partnership with Salt Lake Art Center, Jack Dollhausen: A 30 Year Start is sponsored in part by the Beaux Arts Société, The Allen Foundation for the Arts, The Hackborn foundation and the Andy Warhol foundation for the Visual Arts. The exhibition will travel to the Salt Lake Art Center, the Tacoma Art Museum, the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture in Spokane, and the Holter Museum of Art in Helena.


http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~jackdoll/jak/aes/aesth.htm

mansuri
01-02-2002, 04:23 PM
I like the 3rd the best.

FM

sdfpipsd
01-02-2002, 05:11 PM
Originally posted by mame
You might be interested in looking at Jack Dollhaussen's work.


ROFLMFAO! Thanks for the link, that is very enjoyable. He is a very silly man. He and I differ in our approaches in that he creates theater about science and technology where as I would prefer to hide the science and technology which I am using to create theater. Good stuff though.

AmyH
01-02-2002, 05:15 PM
I was speaking to what actually *is* now.

Your ideas re the red image are excellent. several lifetimes? themostats, glass, water, dimmers, motors for keping water continually flowing, those are not too expensive. riggin the thermostat to the dimmer etc, surely its not all that difficult. I say its do-able in your lifetime. ;)

every registered wc member should donate one dollar a year to a project grant. juried by artists outside the community.

one of the greatest joys in life is buying things you need for your art but cant afford! jimmy rigging stuff, and having it work, is pretty cool too though.

sdfpipsd
01-02-2002, 06:20 PM
Originally posted by AmyH

Your ideas re the red image are excellent. several lifetimes? themostats, glass, water, dimmers, motors for keping water continually flowing, those are not too expensive. riggin the thermostat to the dimmer etc, surely its not all that difficult. I say its do-able in your lifetime. ;)


LOL! Thanks for the encouragement. :)

It would take some real looking just to find a place that could fabricate a custom sheet of glass in those dimensions! I can't imagine anyone doing for under $20,000 and I suspect the real numbers would be closer $250,000 or more for the sheet of glass alone. It would also weigh in the area of a ton or more. This has to be packaged, transported, and installed by by professionals with specialized equipment.

Sound proofing a small gallery would run around $10,000-100,000 depending on how good of a job you demand. A good microphone starts at around $3,000 and I imagine I would need no less than five them. Studio monitors capable of reproducing sound accurately enough for the project start at $1,000 each. The wiring would need to be done by an audio professional who was skilled enough to adjust for wire impedence to keep the audio in tight enough phase so that the sound negation would work.

The computer, programming, light assembly, waterfall, and basic wiring would clock in at about $10,000-20,000. We have not even discussed cost of living, research and travel expenses, promotion, or a strategy for making money from the project to cover cost.

I think the thing which most often kills a great many art installations is that the artists take great ideas and scale them down rather than hold out until the project can be realized in its full glory. It is the difference between the art student who sets up a very large box wrapped in brown paper in the center of a room and Christo wrapping gigantic buildings. :)

AmyH
01-02-2002, 10:42 PM
yeah, ya probably want to do more than one piece in a lifetime.

sdfpipsd
01-03-2002, 12:20 AM
Originally posted by AmyH
yeah, ya probably want to do more than one piece in a lifetime.

<Chuckle> Yeah. Ideally I would like to get a chance to see these things with my own eyes. I have been taking meticulous notes though, so even if I die the ideas remain and if someone else decides to carry them out they will live on even though I will not. :)

arourapope
12-29-2002, 08:40 PM
:D I missed these first time around! Cool stuff! Did you ever do more?