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berkking
01-10-2001, 01:04 PM
I know there are a few of us who use the airbrush. My local art store no longer carries the Badger Air-Opaque line that I used to use. (I haven't picked up my airbrush in almost 10 years)

Does anyone have a favourite brand? And, if so, what are the qualities you look for in an airbrush medium?

Nick

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"Well, God give them wisdom that have it. And those that are fools, let them use their talents!" Feste, 12th Night

bri
01-10-2001, 02:42 PM
Hi Nick!

I wasn't sure if you're mainly concerned with brushes or paints.

I still have some of the old Badger bottles of paint from ten years ago(because I also don't use my airbrush that much anymore), and they're still good. A few years ago I made some mixtures of Badger paints and some Winsor & Newton gouache for an oil painting ground that i wanted to be more absorbent than just acrylic paint.

I still have some Dr. Ph. Martin's "Radiant Concentrated Watercolor" (GLASS!) bottles that I still dig out once in a while. These are 17 years old.

Sometimes I sketch with my IWATA using oils, and airbrush oil paint occasionally. Obviously this is not done without proper ventilation, blah, blah...blah.

If I were going to look for consistent paints to airbrush with, I'd look for MEDIA COM-ART "Non-fading pigmented dyes", available in transparent and opaque.

Someone gave me a set of CREATEX colors (for fabric)but I don't do too much of that so I water them down slightly and use them for stuff that has a short shelf life.

The big brushes (DeVilbiss style) are great and time savers, too.

The Badger 150 (double action) is one of the most widely available brushes and is a middle ground, good for most jobs piece in the tool belt. I got mine in 1984 and still have the body, though the head assembly has been replaced several times. I also have "Franken-Badgers" that have been put together from neglected and abused parts that were graciously extracted from art school trash cans(if i could go back i'd concentrate on scavenging bristle brushes).

(On the smaller[but costlier]side)My other brush is an IWATA model HP-SB which some really great friends of mine presented to me on my 21st birthday ten years ago. This brush is still in great condition, too. The IWATA is for more detailed work but can be pushed a bit toward medium work. I prefer to use a larger tool with more finesse than to ask too much of a smaller one. The Badger is an all around work horse.

Sometimes I almost throw the whole pneumatic kit away.

----------------bri

berkking
01-10-2001, 02:57 PM
Hi bri,

I use an Iwata HP-SB also. The MEDIA paint sounds good to me. Airbrush OIL paint....Tell me more!!!! I used CS10 as a surface for years and I am searching for some more. What surface can hold oils?

Nick

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"Well, God give them wisdom that have it. And those that are fools, let them use their talents!" Feste, 12th Night

bri
01-13-2001, 10:44 AM
Nick,

You could use many surfaces to spray oils onto. A canvas sized with Rabbitskin glue. Illustration board. Sized paper. Any sized fabric. I've used hardboard products. Gatorboard.

---bri

berkking
01-13-2001, 11:30 AM
Hi bri,

Are the oils pre-prepared types for airbrush? I guess I'm having trouble imagining the texture of these.

Nik

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"Well, God give them wisdom that have it. And those that are fools, let them use their talents!" Feste, 12th Night

bri
01-13-2001, 05:27 PM
Hi Nick,

Unfortunately, I've never seen oil paints in airbrushable form and I wouldn't expect it anytime soon either with all the treehugging and handwringing going on. (AIRBORNE CADMIUM???????)This is why i usually just do this outdoors. I've only done a few projects that were mostly airbrushed in oils. The airbrush is a tool and it is not one that I can just grab and use without loosing focus, so I usually stick to brushes(and knives of course http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/frown.gif). I can't imagine what they'd be forced to print on the label of ready to use airbrush oil paints.

Anyway, I usually just thin them slightly with turpentine and have occasionally added a snip of drier to the mix...very little. I would say that the texture is creamy/milky.

----------bri

Keith Russell
02-21-2001, 08:46 PM
Berkking:

did you e-mail me about this? (If not, you SHOULD have! lol)

I use both Golden and Badger, because there are colours in each system I like better than corresponding colours in the other system. (I love Badger White, and hate Golden's--but Badger doesn't offer transparent colours, and Golden's are wonderful.)

I have the local art supply store special order me the Badger paints, and I buy them in the 8-oz. jars.

I buy the Golden paints directly from Golden.

E-mail me if you want contact info for either company, I have sales reps I deal with on a regular basis.

Keith.



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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]

Gary B
02-26-2001, 08:33 PM
You can use tube acrylics...I use baby food jars to thin and mix (distilled water and a touch of Fantastic or OFF. Then filter thru silk-screen cloth into P H Martin type eyedropper bottles.

I've learned a lot of shortcuts and tricks over the years using acrylics and also believe it's the best medium for airbrush work.

I have a Paasch type A, an Olympos HP-B, Iwata HP-B (same thing) and 2 badgers (fine and fat). I like them all, but the Olympos and Iwata are a snap to clean.

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It's just a matter of time.

Keith Russell
02-28-2001, 09:01 PM
Gary:

twenty years ago or more, before the introduction of the 'ready-to-use' airbrush paints, airbrush artists would strain acrylics, guache, inks, and/or dyes, through panty hose, to get them to a consistency which would flow smoothly through an airbrush.

While I know this can be done, if I don't have to do it (and, using the ready-made paints, I don't), saves me time that I believe is best spent painting.

Just FYI: I have an Olympos and an Iwata, too. (I prefer the Iwata.)

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

Gary B
03-01-2001, 09:05 AM
Of course you're right, Keith. (Although I have some premixed Badger 'one ouncers' from the 70's).

My local art store's selection of airbrush paints has dwindled to a handful of colors. I used to just rush down to the store when I need something for a job. I hate to have to get supplies by mail order...but that's seems to be the way of things now.

With many studio artist falling by the wayside in this day of computer graphics, the art stores seem to be catering more to hobbyists. There are sometimes great deals on close-outs, though. I'm a bit of a Luddite when it comes to art/computers

Gary

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It's just a matter of time.

Gary B
03-01-2001, 07:21 PM
I appreciate it Keith, but I do have resources.

Nice to see things haven't changed much in that artists are still going out of their way to help each other.

When I was starting out, the encouragement and "pity" work I got from the old pros is something I'll always be grateful for. Some of the greatest people I've ever known.

Nice to know you all.

Gary

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It's just a matter of time.

Keith Russell
03-02-2001, 12:33 AM
Gary:

I have worked exclusively in airbrushed acrylics (with the odd pen-and-ink piece thrown in for good measure) for the last twenty years or so.

I was trained in commercial art using proportion wheels, and 'specifying' type from typography houses.

When commercial art went digital, I didn't want to put down my airbrush, so I began to look at my work more and more as fine art. I began selling my originals, doing art shows, and basically having a great time.

I buy nearly all my supplies (including airbrushes) through the mail. (I do buy some stuff retail--mat board, foam core, pencil leads, kneaded erasers, the aforementioned special-order Badger paints, etc.--stuff that my local art supply/hobby store usually carries or can get quickly.)

But, I simply don't like having to choose from the off-the-shelf airbrush supply dregs at art supply stores. (Besides, mail-order prices are usually better!)

If you need phone numbers or addresses of where to find anything airbrush-related, let me know, I'll hook you up.

Keith

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

[This message has been edited by Keith Russell (edited March 01, 2001).]

Keith Russell
03-04-2001, 09:35 PM
Gary:

I've heard artists complain about pro artists, and even advanced amateurs, 'keeping secrets' from other artists.

I've been fortunate, in that i've never met any of these artists. I hang out with several pro and semi-pro artists, at science fiction conventions and fine art shows, and everyone I've met has been more than willing to share techniques, methods, and ideas.

There is so much to learn, that I think anyone who kept a certain technique for their own, would soon find that it was the only technique they knew; that if they wouldn't share what they knew with others, no one else would share anything with them, either.

Share and share alike is the rule, at least in the circles I run around in, and I've never heard anyone complain about it.

It makes all of us better artists that way.

Keith

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

berkking
03-05-2001, 02:40 AM
Ditto to the above

Nik

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"Well, God give them wisdom that have it. And those that are fools, let them use their talents!" Feste, 12th Night