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Donn
05-12-2005, 12:25 PM
What color pastel papers are better to work on for landscapes and why? From what I'm reading, white is not a good choice. I'm a fairly new beginner and don't feel I'm ready for the Wallis type of paper. Am I wrong? What brands do you suggest for a beginner? I'm really confused on the color paper issue. Thanks.

khourianya
05-12-2005, 01:57 PM
First things first - beginners can use Wallis. I know I encourage it, because it is such a lovely paper to work on. Plus, you can tint it to any colour you want. Some of the other sanded papers come in various colours too.

As for good coloured papers for landscapes...use something that complements the scene you are working on. I like using warmer toned papers for landscapes (when I do them).

Paula Ford
05-12-2005, 09:49 PM
I totally agree with Cori. Beginners can and SHOULD use Wallis because it is the best and it helps you develop your skills. Other papers (IMHO) are frustrating. For example, when using Canson, it will not take many layers, and therefore the paper fills up with pastel before you are finished with the painting. Also, for me, the pastel just falls off of it.

My favorite color is white. For me it is the easiest to work with. It's like starting with a blank canvas. If I start with a colored paper, my eyes are confused and can't judge what is going on in the painting. Also, if using a colored paper, it forces me to do the sky first. Lots of the time, I don't want to do the sky first...if you know what I mean.

Many artists use colored, and as Cori said, if you do use Wallis, you can tint it any color you'd like. For an underpainting, you can you use any wet media on it, or like me, use Prismacolor markers to do my sketch and lay down some color before getting my pastels out.

Paula

Bringer
05-13-2005, 07:14 PM
Hi,

I'm fairly new to pastels and arts.
I haven't tried many types of paper and haven't tried Wallis, altough I will try it someday.
I've tried Canson and I think it's ok for practicing but there are better papers out there.
I have some Colourfix paper from Art Spectrum; one can also buy the primer.
This paper takes several layers.
Recentely I bought an Ingres type paper from Clairefontaine and altough it does not take many layers, it has a very good price for a beginner.
I bought a pad more or less A3 size with 25 sheets with glassine in between and several colours for 16.29 Euro (about 20 dollars). It's weight is 130g/m2.
To give you an idea the colourfix is 340g/m2 and they also have pads with 1200g/m2.
My Kookaburra Bird painting was done on the Ingres paper and the Apple Pot on Colourfix.
There's also velour paper. People say Hannemuhle is best or one of the best.
The only thing I can say is, there's nothing like trying for your self because it will also depend upon the pastels you will use, I guess.

Best regards,

Bringer

Deborah Secor
05-14-2005, 01:29 PM
I suggest you invest $25 on a packet of all different kinds of papers from Dakota Pastels and see what you like best. I'm willing to bet that you'll list Wallis in your top two, however...

I've been teaching pastel painting to adult students for over 15 years now and I always start them with Wallis. It's THE most forgiving paper I've found, which makes the price acceptable, and even easy to bear. You can change the image over and over and over, until you have something you want to keep, OR you can wipe out an old painting to reuse the whole sheet for a brand new painting (as long as you haven't sprayed it with fixative.)

I usually choose colors that are more medium in tone to paint landscapes, instead of light or white colors. To me white or light colors sometimes look wimpy because all the lights you put down on them look the same. A medium color lets the light colors shine and the darks look dramatic, I think, and it puts some darks into the mix right away. It's easier to paint from darker colors up to the lighter ones in pastel.

I color my Wallis paper by taping it down to my board all the way around, laying it flat, using the side of a pastel stick to lightly add a layer of loose color, and then rubbing like crazy over that with a foam house painting brush. When the color is thoroughly rubbed in, it won't come off and dirty the other colors, but you have to dust off all the excess carefully. You can use any color that way. (And I usually use harder, cheaper pastels to do this, like Nu-Pastels.) Then use some charcoal to lay out your painting, which can easily be wiped away to make changes, and go for the color!

Hope my ideas help. You can do a lot more research in our Pastel Library. Have fun!

Deborah

Donn
05-14-2005, 06:41 PM
Thanks, all, for your comments. I guess my concern with Wallis paper was the expense to "practice" on. Didn't realize you could take off what you did and start over. I guess I may have to give it a try soon. Right now, my $$ for supplies is exhausted for this month. Just ordered 40 half sticks of Sennelier pastels.
That's one great think about this group. a beginner can learn a lot. And my many thanks to Carly for all she's helped me with.
:)



I suggest you invest $25 on a packet of all different kinds of papers from Dakota Pastels and see what you like best. I'm willing to bet that you'll list Wallis in your top two, however...

I've been teaching pastel painting to adult students for over 15 years now and I always start them with Wallis. It's THE most forgiving paper I've found, which makes the price acceptable, and even easy to bear. You can change the image over and over and over, until you have something you want to keep, OR you can wipe out an old painting to reuse the whole sheet for a brand new painting (as long as you haven't sprayed it with fixative.)

I usually choose colors that are more medium in tone to paint landscapes, instead of light or white colors. To me white or light colors sometimes look wimpy because all the lights you put down on them look the same. A medium color lets the light colors shine and the darks look dramatic, I think, and it puts some darks into the mix right away. It's easier to paint from darker colors up to the lighter ones in pastel.

I color my Wallis paper by taping it down to my board all the way around, laying it flat, using the side of a pastel stick to lightly add a layer of loose color, and then rubbing like crazy over that with a foam house painting brush. When the color is thoroughly rubbed in, it won't come off and dirty the other colors, but you have to dust off all the excess carefully. You can use any color that way. (And I usually use harder, cheaper pastels to do this, like Nu-Pastels.) Then use some charcoal to lay out your painting, which can easily be wiped away to make changes, and go for the color!

Hope my ideas help. You can do a lot more research in our Pastel Library. Have fun!

Deborah