PDA

View Full Version : Old printmaker - new rules in school


WackyDog
05-05-2005, 04:44 PM
I've been asked to lend a hand in an art class that just got a shiny new etching press. They have a darkroom, but are not going to be able to etch traditionally with acid, because of a lack of sink & exhaust....and liability.

I've been trying to collect link on non-toxic intaglio (Howard's site I've had for a couple of years; have his book). Can anyone point me in the direction of other new types of plate prep?

Thanks much.

Diane Cutter
05-05-2005, 05:31 PM
Welcome, Wacky...

When you say plate prep, do you mean other means of printing with a press and no acid?...

You might want to try drypoint, using plexiglass... or do monotypes or collographs...

Tell us more about waht you want to do... Sounds like the sky is the limit... with no budget...

Diane

H2O_Baby
05-05-2005, 07:56 PM
I've been asked to lend a hand in an art class that just got a shiny new etching press. They have a darkroom, but are not going to be able to etch traditionally with acid, because of a lack of sink & exhaust....and liability.

I've been trying to collect link on non-toxic intaglio (Howard's site I've had for a couple of years; have his book). Can anyone point me in the direction of other new types of plate prep?

Thanks much.

The art center I go to doesn't do acids for the same reason, so we do monoprint/monotype primarily there.

WackyDog
05-06-2005, 07:47 AM
Specifically - what do the the new polymer plates require for etching, after the film has been exposed? Is the control anything like working with nitric?

I've worked with some photographic processes in the past - but the school made us sign a waiver because of the level of toxicity of the chemicals used. And I found that even with a good exposure & etch, there were areas I needed to develop further by hand.

I did a quick search on the web and maybe I'm hallucinating, but I thought I saw some new materials for litho, too. Stone litho is my first love, especially with color & metallic inks. I learned the traditional processes, but it's pretty clear that things have changed quite a bit in 20 years (I wasn't actively working for jeez...two decades!! It was an acute cranial-rectal attack that I'm just now recovering from.)

To teach an introduction to printmaking, I'd want to make sure that I always compared the processes used in class, with the traditional methods if there was a significant difference - both in working & printing the image and in aethestic qualities. And I'm afraid I'm just completely ignorant of the new methods right now. Hopefully, I'll have a chance to go through all the info in this forum soon.

doug_h
05-06-2005, 08:52 AM
You might look at Stange Ross' site http://www.psy.ku.dk/ross/ He does photo gravure.

sassybird
05-06-2005, 02:23 PM
Every one has about covered the non toxic techniques, but have not addressed the non toxic cleanup. I use veggie oil to clean most of the ink off my plates, and then a further clean up with Dawn dishwashing liquid and whiting to finish the cleaning of the plate, getting the oil off the plate. Afterwards I use a little bit of mineral spirits on a rag to wipe away any oils left on the plate. The most toxic part is the mineral spirits, but it takes very little for the final cleaning. This will work on lino as well as intaglio plates. With the lino plates it is best that they are mounted to keep the backing from getting wet.

I forgot I use the same cleaning technique on my brayers.

janemoth
05-06-2005, 02:41 PM
What a shame you can't use acids. : ( No photographic or monotype process can transmit the old masterish feel of a delicate line etching and tones of aquatint. I don't do copper but I understand the acid is less toxic, you can even get it on your hands for short periods of time with no ill effect. I think its action is one of corrosion, which happens everywhere, whereas nitric is "eating" into things. I would even venture to guess that the cadmiums, leads, and turps in the painting studio are more toxic. Try to get as much of a traditional shop setup going as you can, the kids will thank you. : }

Diane Cutter
05-06-2005, 03:48 PM
Every one has about covered the non toxic techniques, but have not addressed the non toxic cleanup. I use veggie oil to clean most of the ink off my plates, and then a further clean up with Dawn dishwashing liquid and whiting to finish the cleaning of the plate, getting the oil off the plate. Afterwards I use a little bit of mineral spirits on a rag to wipe away any oils left on the plate. The most toxic part is the mineral spirits, but it takes very little for the final cleaning. This will work on lino as well as intaglio plates. With the lino plates it is best that they are mounted to keep the backing from getting wet.

I forgot I use the same cleaning technique on my brayers.
Let me add to Sassy's tips:

I have rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle that I use for cleaning up. I used it after scraping or wiping the inks off. It's amazing how great it cleans things up. I've almost totally eliminated veggie oil and the liquid soap (has to be Dawn)...

Diane

Sunfilly
05-06-2005, 11:05 PM
There is a non acid method you use during exposure of photoetch or polyplates using aquatint screens and half tone screens

Some info here.

http://www.danielsmith.com/learn/techLeaflets/0017/

http://www.danielsmith.com/cgi-bin/sgsh0113.exe

here click on RESEARCH & DESIGN

Smaller Aquatint & Half Tone Screens

http://www.praga.com/Newsletter/nwl9.htm#research1

How you use them I do not know. To find out more info, google for aquatint and half tone screens.

WackyDog
05-07-2005, 08:03 AM
thanks all!

Guess I'm off to do my homework!

sassybird
05-07-2005, 11:42 AM
Let me add to Sassy's tips:

I have rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle that I use for cleaning up. I used it after scraping or wiping the inks off. It's amazing how great it cleans things up. I've almost totally eliminated veggie oil and the liquid soap (has to be Dawn)...

Diane

I knew I was forgetting something.....lol I use alcohol too.