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View Full Version : What do you use as a travel easel?


HarvestMoon
05-04-2005, 12:54 PM
I have been looking for months for a decent travel easel. Some seem to have very tiny surfaces to work on, some have one pole up the center and it seems like your board would wiggle from side to side. Others you mount on a tripod, which is another thing to carry and I am great at knocking them over. I have tried the 1/2 box easel, and that back leg is so far out I trip over it, with the box not really meant for pastels it seems a waste. Have finally solved my 'to go' box for pastels with 2 Roz boxes, but the easel? I read the latest Pastel Journal article on traveling with your supplies, and still am just as confused. This is probably one of things that is up to personal taste, but would like to hear what you guys use especially if it is fairly low cost!

ArtsiePhartsie
05-04-2005, 01:43 PM
Thanks for posting this question. I find myself faced with the same dilema as yourself...read the pj article too and am still confused as to which is the best way to go. I'm looking forward to reading responses to this post!

~Artsie

Khadres
05-04-2005, 03:33 PM
On Kitty Wallis' recommendation, I bought this one while down in Santa Fe...it's pretty nifty and soooo light to carry with its own neat little carrying case. Weight it down on site with a bag of rocks hung off to center post and you're good to go! I got the vertical one, BTW. I'm well pleased with Winsor Newton easles...I also have the Arundel table easel which is like a french easle without the legs.

http://www.dickblick.com/zz515/45/

HarvestMoon
05-04-2005, 03:38 PM
Sooz- that looks ok, except it is the center post type- doesn't your board wobble back and forth? Or does the bottom piece and clamp at the top work that well... My pastel boards are pretty thin, have not found a thick, but large lightweight one.

khourianya
05-04-2005, 04:17 PM
I have the Bristol too. It is pretty nice and very sturdy. I have looked at the french easels and have heard the complaint that they are really heavy to lug around. I like the fact that the W&N has it's own case and can be adjusted down to a table easel, if you want to.

Bringer
05-04-2005, 04:45 PM
Hi,

I don't know much about fied easels, but I guess that a good brand is «Stanrite» . Hope the name is well spelled.

Regards,

Bringer

Khadres
05-04-2005, 04:50 PM
Purples, nope I haven't noticed any wobbling...the support is kinda supported by the angled side pieces, the top clamp and the cross piece at the bottom...pretty stable really. I usually use a 1/2" thick piece of foamcore for a board to tape paper to. Works fine. Of course, nothing is Texas tornado proof! :D

johndill01
05-04-2005, 07:30 PM
I just purchased a Napoli easel with travel case. Weighs just five pounds, has a single center post that may be adjusted up and down, reasonably well designed clamps that are completely adjustable. May be used as a table type easel, or completely upright with a slight negative lean for pastel use. It appears that it is going to be reasonably stable while working on it. Jerry's did have a good sale price on these.

Will follow up on this just as soon as I get a chance to get outside and paint on it.

John

HarvestMoon
05-04-2005, 07:54 PM
thank you both- I will check out everything posted to see what 'hits' me as 'the one' :D

jackiesimmonds
05-05-2005, 04:33 AM
Re the "Centre Post" thing..........this is something you cannot really avoid. Most easels have a centre post, to give yu the height you might need.

I have the same one as Sooz, and also use the King Best (which I won't enlarge upon in case you cannot get it in the USA) which is an aluminium lightweight tripod-type. The point is, in both cases, the BASE of the board is well supported, the holders being quite widely spaced, and you cannot get any easel which holds the top of the board in exactly the same way.

If you use fairly thick Fome Core, you should have little problem with the board shifting around a lot, but if you work on a very large and wide board, you cannot avoid a certain amount of movement. When working out of doors, it probably is not a good idea to work too large or wide, anyway, because a) it is difficult to see over or around the board b) you will find that passers by will bump into you all the time and c) a sudden strong gust of wind could cause lift-off!

The easel Sooz recommends is really good, I use it a lot, and can heartily recommend it. The metal "base" for the board is excellent and provides good support.

J

HarvestMoon
05-05-2005, 11:04 AM
Thank you- I had not even thought of looking AROUND a large board... but outdoors it makes perfect sense. I have generally painted from photos (and of course the image library)

HarvestMoon
05-05-2005, 07:59 PM
My child-hauling van has a table in it- perhaps I should just use a table easel, then I can slam the door if a longhorn pops his head (and horns) in. (This is no joke- has happened before). Then I can carry everything with me- keep a case of diet cokes on ice..... little Debbies... every color and size of paper- in fact, I could just make the kids ride in the truck and convert the van to the pastel-o-van!

Paula Ford
05-05-2005, 09:14 PM
My child-hauling van has a table in it- perhaps I should just use a table easel, then I can slam the door if a longhorn pops his head (and horns) in. (This is no joke- has happened before). Then I can carry everything with me- keep a case of diet cokes on ice..... little Debbies... every color and size of paper- in fact, I could just make the kids ride in the truck and convert the van to the pastel-o-van!

LOL!

Khadres
05-05-2005, 09:52 PM
Works for me! I'm envious! I even have these nifty stackin' trays for the paper...you can have 'em CHEAP! :evil:

HarvestMoon
05-06-2005, 09:15 PM
OK, so PM me with how cheap is cheap and would shipping cost more than we just paid in taxes?