PDA

View Full Version : Making Pastels (Check this out)


Bringer
04-26-2005, 01:50 PM
Hi,

Hope you find this usefull

http://www.danielsmith.com/learn/inksmith/200110/

Regards,

Bringer

khourianya
04-26-2005, 02:34 PM
Paul deMarrais (the authour) actually sells his handmade pastels on his website at www.pastelpaul.com

He's a really nice guy. I quite enjoyed emailing him last year when I bought a selection of the pastels. They are nice size pastels - I am actually due to order a couple more of his colours. I haven't been able to find a blue quite like the one i got from him!!! :)

Khadres
04-28-2005, 02:08 PM
Cori, when you get more space, you really should order some of Kitty's moist pastels and make your own...you're a hands-on kinda gal and would LOVE it! I would love to do my own too, but my hands begin hurting early on when mixing and rolling the colors and one DOES need a small, totally clean area to work in ... something that's scarce around here for any length of time. I think we worked out that if one bought the whole set of moist base color pastels and rolled everything possible with it, the cost of the pastels would be somewhere around 50 cents apiece! Can't beat that with a stick!

Oops, almost forgot my point! :o One of the loveliest blues imaginable is the one I got from Kitty's one day pastel making workshop in NM. I've never seen one this intense anywhere and sofffffffffffffffffffffft, too! She made one for each student that day, saying it was the most popular color...I can see why!

khourianya
04-28-2005, 02:56 PM
That's my plan somewhere down the road. I have been trying to steer cam towards houses with basement suites in them so I can take over the kitchen area and take out the stove so I an have a hood fan over a small table for pastel making.... It's a pipe dream but a dream none the less. I will probably end up with Kitty's moist pastels somewhere along the line.

Kitty Wallis
04-28-2005, 03:31 PM
My favorite place to make pastels is under a shade tree on a still, or slightly breezy warm day. Do not do it in your house. I did it on my dining room table the first time. I cleaned pastel stains up for days.

Khadres
04-28-2005, 03:44 PM
I thought that might be a problem, Kitty! So, pastel making should really be best done during outdoor weather? I have a nice covered patio which could work, except that four ravening dogs run in and out through it all day long...I can just imagine doggie feet tracking ultra blue and quinacridone violet into the house despite my best intentions!

Cori if you get your basement suite thingy...LEAVE the stove in and put one of these cool covers on it for a work surface, then store stuff in the oven! After all, ya never know when you might want to cook up some rabbit skin glue! (cover the bunnie's ears if you read this aloud!) It's not REALLY made of rabbit skin, is it?!?!?!?!

Kitty, I'm assuming that when you make pastels, you set out to work with only one range of color at a time with a limited number of base hues open? Like, say, golden colors from reddish to green one time and then blues and lavendars another? Can't imagine working across the spectrum at one time. Do you have a set method of choosing which to do together and when?

khourianya
04-28-2005, 05:47 PM
So, pastel making should really be best done during outdoor weather?

Egads - that would limit me to maybe 3 months of the year when it is warm and dry here. Weather in Calgary is so unpredictable that the saying goes that if you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes...and after 10 years here it is definitely true!

and LOL at the rabbit skin glue comment. Poor Bunns. She might start to get a complex if I started talking about things like that around her.

Khadres
04-28-2005, 06:24 PM
I'm sure you COULD make pastels indoors, but it's rather like working in a "clean room" to keep all the colors separate and uncontaminated. Wore me out during the class! I was working with Hansa yellow and I think I wound up with more yellow on my blue shirt than anywhere else!

Kitty Wallis
04-28-2005, 10:57 PM
I only make pastels 3 or 4 times a year. So I can usually wait for good weather. And if I can't I do it in my garage which is my studio, of course. Anyone here park a car in the garage?

Sooz asked: "Kitty, I'm assuming that when you make pastels, you set out to work with only one range of color at a time with a limited number of base hues open? Like, say, golden colors from reddish to green one time and then blues and lavendars another? Can't imagine working across the spectrum at one time. Do you have a set method of choosing which to do together and when?"

Sooz, I make all the colors available when i make pastels, since I usually remember what I need as I work. The way I keep from making muddy, dirty colors, is to close the jars right away, and handle everything with paper towels, not leaving pigment on anything.

Most of you don't know that the full name of my pastels is PURE PIGMENT Moist Pastels. No artist material is made with pure pigment, usually. 25% pigment is considered a heavy load. I like pure pigment pastels. Let's have the maximum color! I say. My point here is, pure pigment is Very strong and can mark up a large area with a few crumbs. So I don't do it in the house.

Khadres
04-29-2005, 02:09 AM
I can only imagine what the pure pigment could do...I accidentally smushed just a bit of a couple of Senneliers...a red (of COURSE!) and a dark green...both still reside boldly and clearly in the studio rug despite several cleanings since then. Luckily the yellow I got on my shirt in Santa Fe washed out!

HarvestMoon
04-30-2005, 05:10 PM
When I got to the rabbit glue, I too went YIKES- my poor house bunny was looking at me funny after that.... he says I have enough pastels without making them. Cori, you are welcome to come here and have 10 months of outdoor weather- it got up to nearly 100 F yesterday- August is really fun! Making pastels outdoors here would incorporate goat pellets I am sure- wonder how that is as a binder?

khourianya
05-01-2005, 11:51 AM
Making pastels outdoors here would incorporate goat pellets I am sure- wonder how that is as a binder?

lol....and with my zoo, making them indoors might incorporate some kind of pellets into the mix! Of course, if my pastels had that in them, Abner might suddenly decide they were edible...(aargh. puppies :rolleyes: )

You can have the heat. Two months of hot, dry summer are more than enough for me. I would happily move to the arctic if I could. I could deal with endless days in the summer in exchange for mild temperatures. if it never got above 15 degrees centigrade I would be thrilled! (Yes I'm odd...but the heat and I don't mix well)