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*Marina*
04-13-2005, 02:45 PM
When I was browsing through the pastel studio I came across putting a drawing into grey scale? What is the exact purpose of that? What should you pay attention to after you have done that.

Bringer
04-13-2005, 03:23 PM
Hi,

I'm new into pastels so someone else my respond better than me, but I'll try to help.
If you scan a colour pic and turn it to greyscale you will have a better perception of how colours differ in terms of contrast, thus permiting to create a more appealing painting.
I guess this one reason.
Now keep waiting for more replies :D

Regards,

Bringer

*Marina*
04-13-2005, 04:46 PM
Hi Bringer

Thanks for your explanation. It is all so new for me. I only started drawing last year. The same for the computer. Only recently I am getting involved in the computer. Last month I started learning photoshop. A new world opens and it is great.
One of these days I will have the courage to send a drawing to the pastel studio.

Trilby
04-13-2005, 04:56 PM
Please do post your art work. Lots of friendly people here who give support and feedback.
Grey scale: it's all about values. Value is the first thing to think about when choosing a color or choosing a shade if working in black and white. Converting a color photo to greyscale converts it to a value study and helps you to see those values but also to see the design element of the distribution of values--is there a good balance between dark medium and light values for instance. When working from a reference photo, it is sometimes helpful to scan or photograph your art piece, convert to greyscale and compare to the reference photo in greyscale as a way of checking whether you have the values right.
TJ

Artistammy
04-13-2005, 06:06 PM
Sometimes when you convert a reference & a painting to grey scale you can see that your darks may not be dark enough - not enough contrast. Beginning pastelists are often timid about the darkest darks & the really light parts.

jackiesimmonds
04-14-2005, 01:47 AM
Please do post your art work. Lots of friendly people here who give support and feedback.
Grey scale: it's all about values. Value is the first thing to think about when choosing a color or choosing a shade if working in black and white. Converting a color photo to greyscale converts it to a value study and helps you to see those values but also to see the design element of the distribution of values--is there a good balance between dark medium and light values for instance. When working from a reference photo, it is sometimes helpful to scan or photograph your art piece, convert to greyscale and compare to the reference photo in greyscale as a way of checking whether you have the values right.
TJ

well said above.

beginners to painting eventually get to look at "Colour theory" - and there are all sorts of wonderful things to discover.

The terms can be a little confusing at first - "local colour" for example doesn't mean the colour of things in your district (!) but the actual colour of the object - for example, a red pepper's local colour is RED.

But although that red may appear to be uniform in colour, when the light strikes that object, the colour is modified by the light - the brightly lit areas will be a different red to the bits in shadow.

The TONE of the red then can be seen to change. So then we get into another whole area of colour theory.

Learning to recognise the correct TONES of colours (value is another word) is a really important part of an artist's development - and seeing something in greyscale helps in the learning, because then the tones/value become apparent - and that is exactly the same as seeing the contrasts, by the way.

Once you have truly grasped the whole concept of seeing the proper tones, your ability to translate the visual world correctly on canvas or paper will improve dramatically.

Then you can move on to other aspects of colour theory - colour harmony, colour complements, temperature - all sorts of fun stuff to learn.

enjoy

Jackie

*Marina*
04-14-2005, 10:05 AM
Dear Jackie and all the others,

Once again thank you for the advice. I have tried it with one of my drawings. It is quite interesting. I will try and post it. For every thing there must be a first time. Let's hope it wil work. The quality of the picture is not perfect but one can get an impression. I took the photo of the apples in Italy. I don't know yet what to look for exactly. Maybe somebody can comment.

Greetings

*Marina*
04-14-2005, 10:17 AM
Dear all,

Just for complementary information I attach the original photo from which I made the drawing which I posted earlier.

chewie
04-14-2005, 10:52 AM
WELCOME WELCOME!!!!

and those are great!! you've dne a fantastic job on the color and values. keep it up and most some more!

bnoonan
04-14-2005, 11:18 AM
Wow - well done. You really have a grasp on the tonal range in this photograph. Can't wait to see more of your work and thanks for joining us!

Barb :clap:

Trilby
04-14-2005, 11:38 AM
I'm so glad you've posted your rendering. It is beautifully done. If you convert the reference photo to greyscale you will see that you have achieved all the value placement in a similar way to the photo. The photo is slightly more contrasty, that is the lights are lighter and the darks darker than in your painting, however, photos tend to be contrasty. Excellent job.
TJ

*Marina*
04-15-2005, 06:21 AM
Thank you chewie, bnoonan and aztrillium for all your positive comments. That gives me some confidence to continue. Thanks a lot :cat: :cat:

E-J
04-15-2005, 10:00 AM
Don't be shy of posting your work - your apples are superb :clap:

Greyscale will allow you to see whether you've achieved enough variety of dark, medium and light values in your image. What is 'enough'? Could be when you've managed to create a convincingly three-dimensional representation of your subject (as you have with your lovely rounded apples) but you might also be looking to achieve a pleasing overall pattern of shapes, where the areas of light and dark feel nicely balanced within your picture space. Putting your image into greyscale reduces it to an abstract pattern of values and helps you to see this without the distraction of colour.

Continue with confidence! :)

Muffin_4377
04-15-2005, 01:06 PM
Welcome Applebee

Yes I agree your apples are wonderful!! Please do show us more!!

jackiesimmonds
04-16-2005, 03:03 AM
Atrilium has given you the answer to using greyscale effectively; you put both your PAINTING and your REFERENCE PHOTO into greyscale, and compare. Then you can see how well you have done with the colour/tone interpretation.

It would be fun to try this exercise, using real apples and working from life. It is a very different feeling to working from a photo. Did you know that the naked eye can see millions more colours than the camera can? I recommend you try it sometime.

J

Dark_Shades
04-16-2005, 05:19 AM
what a brilliant crop of apples you have :) .. you can tell by the eye there will be no surprises when turned to greyscale..... when a picture isnt working, when turned to greyscale, you will find that your subject matter takes no shape, form or definition, and just sits there flat and stays within the background

- great job........ lets see more :clap:

*Marina*
04-17-2005, 06:50 AM
Thanks everybody for all the advice. Jackie, I will try to start working from live but find that still extremely difficult. Don't know where to start.

Greetings

*Marina*
08-19-2005, 04:44 PM
For completeness I send a picture in greyscale of the reference photo.