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Tony Perrotta
12-17-2001, 04:09 PM
Hi everybody. Ok some questions please. What is the difference between a mono block and a mone type. Can you give me a quick run down of all the types of printmaking. I am not sure what I want to start with, hopefully something that doesn't require alot of supplies. Till I get back to work, I'll be buying few things.

Thanks Tony

Gisela
12-17-2001, 05:31 PM
A monotype is an original one-of-a-kind print done by applying paint or ink to a non-porous surface (plexiglass, glass, varnished wood, etc.) and then tranferred to paper.
A monoprint is the same thing used along with other printmaking techniques, such as etching or relief printing.

I haven't heard of monoblock, but then I'm pretty new at this. Maybe someone else knows?

Monotype is prolly the cheapest way to get started.

I'll post some more on other types of printmaking later, but gotta get to an artwalk meeting in a few minutes.

Gis

mame
12-17-2001, 06:38 PM
What Gisela said. Sometimes monotype and monoprint are used interchangeably so it does get confusing. Think also one difference between a monotype and a monoprint is sometimes additional prints are pulled from the inked monoprint plate. These are called "ghost" prints. Mono-types are a one shot deal.

Go to Google and search "Printmaking Terms". There are a gazillion sites. And don't forget your local university library. Tons of info there I bet.

sassybird
12-20-2001, 03:59 AM
With the ghost prints that mame spoke of you can do endless things with. I have printed over them with a simple black lino block print, gone in and added things I see in the ghost print with other mediums, combined the ghost with an intaglio print to make a varied edition, etc..... Never throw away a ghost, or for that matter a test print that you may want to use at some later date to experiment with. In doing this though you need to note that use of the image in your editions.

Tony Perrotta
12-20-2001, 07:24 AM
Thanks everybody, I think I'll try a few monotype's and see what happens. I am, as I'm sure everybody else is very busy with X-Mas. Not much time to do anything now, can't wait till it's over.

Thanks Tony

Gisela
12-20-2001, 10:42 AM
Originally posted by Tony Perrotta
I am, as I'm sure everybody else is very busy with X-Mas. Not much time to do anything now, can't wait till it's over.

Thanks Tony

I hear that!! I'm itching to use this new press and din't have a minute to spare till after Xmas! :(

Gisela

bazooka
12-22-2001, 08:16 PM
I believe some of the answers here have been a little bit off,

The best way to think of the two is that a monotype is an unreproducible print, there is no way that you can achieve more than the one impression from the matrix. On the other hand, a monoprint is some thing that could have been reproduced from any kind of matrix but wasn't for what ever reason.

Gisela
12-22-2001, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by bazooka
On the other hand, a monoprint is some thing that could have been reproduced from any kind of matrix but wasn't for what ever reason.

:confused:
So you're saying that a monoprint is a print that wasn't even made?? It's a print that could have been?
Sorry, I don't understand.

Gisela

bazooka
12-22-2001, 09:09 PM
Gisela,

Sorry I didn't make that more clear. By saying it couldn't be reproduced I meant that it more than one exact impression could not be made.

BTW - being a rank newbie to wet paint (but not to prints) how does one quote an earlier response here like you did?

-b

Gisela
12-23-2001, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by bazooka


BTW - being a rank newbie to wet paint (but not to prints) how does one quote an earlier response here like you did?

-b

Thanks for clarifying that, Bazooka.

And welcome to Wetcanvas! :cool: It's nice to have another knowledgeable printmkaer here. I'm pretty new to printmaking myself, so I'm hoping to learn lots here.

When you want to quote someone, just use the quote button at the bottom right corner of the post you're quoting instead of hitting the reply button at the bottom of the page.

Gisela