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jackiesimmonds
04-07-2005, 07:26 AM
I have noticed that there are many new names in the forum of late, and thought I might direct you to a couple of old threads which offer step by step demos.

I've been around here a long time, so these have rather slipped away into the mists of time!

still life with fruits:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=57331
broken colour:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60061

outdoor scene
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=177325

venice scene
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=173337

fun Van Gogh step by step to copy
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=64210

jackie

artpaint
04-07-2005, 02:15 PM
Thanks so much for posting this I need all the practice I can get.
Betty

susiebell
04-07-2005, 06:36 PM
Thanks so much for posting these threads. I took a quick look and can see there is much to learn from them. I'm going to try and make it to Barnes and Nobel tomorrow to buy one of your books. :D

thanks again!

Paula Ford
04-07-2005, 08:30 PM
Thanks Jackie. What a great idea!!

Paula

Moosehead
04-08-2005, 12:04 AM
Thanks Jackie. You do beautiful work (particularly that stairway).
As Tom (TChris) knows, I'm about to be another to join in this forum. I'm an oil painter, but have been very impressed by pastels lately, so I bought some. Right now I am getting the feel of them, but hope to complete a simple peice soon.

It's funny how I see similarity's in the issues in this medium and oil-too seemingly quite different mediums-blending vs not blending, for example-an issue we oil painters also often discuss.

I will also say that this forum contains a ton of valuable information, especially on composition, light and shadow, and values that really would be helpful in any medium-I'm glad I started lurking here.

jackiesimmonds
04-08-2005, 03:07 AM
thanks all - so glad you all found these old threads helpful.

If you have no luck at B&N, Susiebell, do try amazon, their prices are good. Even i cannot beat 'em!

Moosehead, the elements you mention - value, comp, etc, are common to all mediums, and should be discussed more. I suspect that with watercolours, they are discussed perhaps somewhat less, because there is a preoccupation with technique with that medium. I am sure you will find LOADS of useful info in this forum.

Dont forget the articles here at WC too. I have written a couple of teaching articles, one on composition which many have said to be very helpful. Have a browse through the articles index, under pastels, to find it.

Jackie

Moosehead
04-08-2005, 10:38 AM
Yes-I've read through a number of those articles. Very informative and of value to artists in several mediums. If I recall, Jackie, you've written an article in the Composition forum as well (somewhere else anyway), that I found to be quite clear and helpful. Your writing is excellent-very clear.

jackiesimmonds
04-09-2005, 09:29 AM
well, yes, I did write an article about composition, but I THINK it is in the pastels forum part of the articles index. Dont quote me on that tho, and in case it isn't, you can find it here:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/1805/333/

Jackie

emagineer
04-09-2005, 10:37 AM
A beginner/improver.....and a lurker for far too long. I did a search on my question (which follows), but am now overwhelmed by the amount of information. So, here goes and hope it isn't a complete repeat of a past thread.

Have been messing with pastels off and on....through classes and on my own. WC/Soft Pastel forums is a wealth of information beyond what I ever expected.

I made the plunge to upgrade the quality of my pastels (bought/in hand) and ordered the pastel paper sampler pack. My intent is to continue using what I had along with incorporating the new. Problem right now is I am "frozen". My analytical has taken over just considering the possibilities.

Questions: Do most try out the pastels and paper by just plunging in with a subject matter? Or has it been found best to sample through a process of testing colors, brands, technique, etc.? If the latter, is there a recommendation for this process? Color chart like layout, notes?

And Jackie, I was all set to post to your area. Sorry to hear you have decided to close it.

Thanks,

Sandy in Colorado

jackiesimmonds
04-09-2005, 02:35 PM
A beginner/improver.....and a lurker for far too long. I did a search on my question (which follows), but am now overwhelmed by the amount of information. So, here goes and hope it isn't a complete repeat of a past thread.

Have been messing with pastels off and on....through classes and on my own. WC/Soft Pastel forums is a wealth of information beyond what I ever expected.

I made the plunge to upgrade the quality of my pastels (bought/in hand) and ordered the pastel paper sampler pack. My intent is to continue using what I had along with incorporating the new. Problem right now is I am "frozen". My analytical has taken over just considering the possibilities.

Questions: Do most try out the pastels and paper by just plunging in with a subject matter? Or has it been found best to sample through a process of testing colors, brands, technique, etc.? If the latter, is there a recommendation for this process? Color chart like layout, notes?

And Jackie, I was all set to post to your area. Sorry to hear you have decided to close it.

Thanks,

Sandy in Colorado

what have you got to lose by plunging right in there, and trying out a picture on each piece? You will quickly discover, that way, which ones you like and which ones you like less.
If doing a picture scares you, tho I cannot imagine why, cos you dont need to show the results to anyone, it's just for you - then simply practice techniques, and use the same techniques on each sheet, and the same colours, and then you will have a really good feeling for the differences.

As for my forum - - I am afraid that I just cannot afford the dues!!!

Jackie

emagineer
04-09-2005, 03:26 PM
Jackie,

Your answer is just what I needed. Know the question sounded simple to the outside world....but my brain was working overtime.

The suggestion to do the same pic with same process on different papers....will get me past frozen, allow some of the analytical (seeing the different results) but definitely head into the creative.

Thanks,

Sandy in Colorado

RainySea
03-13-2008, 10:40 PM
THere were some great DEMO's posted for pastels, but I was trying to access some of these but it says I have insuffienct privileges or other stuff. Are these restricted? I am logged in. I can't even reply to the message as it says I can't post URLs. Thanks.

Deborah Secor
03-13-2008, 11:10 PM
It's not you! Our Pastel Library is closed for renovation right now, so the access is restricted to everyone. Our Moderators are revamping it and it should be open in a while again, so we can see the shiny new version of it. Hang in there.... meanwhile, if you want to see some specific demos just ask and some of us who spend a lot of time here will see if we can find some in the threads for you to view.

Deborah

Um, well, it looks like it's open...not sure why this is happening... :confused:

Kathryn Wilson
03-13-2008, 11:57 PM
It is close for construction, but we wanted people to be able to read threads that are still there. Yes, we are moving things out of the Library and into new subforums that are not visible while we work.

Sorry about that - but it will be great when we get it done!

RainySea
03-14-2008, 02:07 AM
Thanks Kathryn and Deborah! If anyone has any links to demos on pastels, it would be much appreciated. I'm just getting started and sometimes seeing a process. . . thanks very much.

rainy_dogpark@myway.com

jackiesimmonds
03-14-2008, 06:01 AM
good grief, how amazing to see this thread pop up again after 3 years!!!!!! Glad the links still work.

edit: oops spoke too soon. Only the Van Gogh demo works........:(

Jackie

Adiro
03-14-2008, 12:00 PM
Jackie, some of us ( myself) cannot open those links, the WC tells me that I don't have enough privilleges, my account is in order, do you know why I cannot open them?
thank you

Kathryn Wilson
03-14-2008, 12:07 PM
It is closed for construction. Yes, we are moving things out of the Library and into new subforums that are not visible while we work. We probably, should shut it down until we are done to avoid the confusion. Many of the threads have been moved into a new subforum awaiting completion of the project.

Sorry about that - but it will be great when we get it done!

mindofmirrors
03-14-2008, 01:59 PM
Well, dang... can't seem to view any of them. Tells me I "don't have permission." What... I need a note from the headmaster or sumpthin?! ;-)

mindofmirrors
03-14-2008, 01:59 PM
oh... heheh... SHRA on me...hehe

Deborah Secor
03-14-2008, 03:42 PM
:lol: Yep, Rick, you need a note! :p

Since I could open the Van Gogh thread I thought I'd just copy and paste the opening here for those who are interested... You can see it was posted originally in 2002. A blast from the past from our own Jackie!

A little while ago, I promised to post a demo from my Pastels Workbook, a practice piece from a Van Gogh painting. For centuries, it has been common practice to "transcribe" the work of a master. This time, instead of copying the master's every brush mark, I have used Van Gogh's linear style, to help someone fairly new to pastels. By repeating his picture (not copying exactly), you will learn how to use pastels in a particular way. Van Gogh's writhing, twisting marks give the piece great energy, and because three-dimensional form is subdued in favour of these energetic marks, it means we can concentrate on the mark-making element fully. You will, in fact, be using Van Gogh's image to help you develop technical skills with pastels, particularly with side strokes, linear strokes and stabbing marks. You will see what wonderful results you can achieve without any blending at all!!

STEP ONE.
On grey pastel paper, draw the main outlines of the image freehand, using either charcoal or pastel pencil. If you are nervous about losing these outlines, you can fix them before moving on.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2002/vg_step_1.JPG

STEP TWO.
Using small linear strokes (point of the pastel) with dark green, work on the cypress trees and bushes, twisting your wrist to make the marks curve. Block in the distant hills with medium blue, using either side strokes,(side of the pastel) or cross-hatching (edge or point of the pastel). Use the same blue in the clouds.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2002/vg_step_2.JPG

STEP THREE.
Using curving linear strokes, work on the green bushes and the tree again, this time using two different medium greens. Break a short piece off your yellow pastel, and using it on its side, with a very light touch, block in the foreground with diagonal strokes. Also, using the side of a small piece of purple-grey pastel, make curving strokes for the clouds, and allow some of your marks to overlap the blue in places The purple and blue will mix slightly, which is fine, it gives you a third colour automatically. Use a lighter blue over the hills to suggest undulating form, and tiny marks of the same blue on the stunted tree on the left.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2002/vg_step_3.JPG

STEP FOUR. (lots of little steps really.)
Block in the turquoise sky between the clouds, and dont worry if your colours overlap a little, they will blend , which is good. Use the same colour, in tiny linear strokes, in the small foreground tree. Switch to a white pastel and complete the clouds, allowing the white to overlap and mix with the purple and blue. Use the white over the turquoise in places to soften the colour and break it up a little. Work on the cornfield with small strokes, dots and dashes of orange and then brown, to suggest the wind moving the surface. Complete the pic with details; using lightest green, define some of the foliage a little more; returiing to your darkest green, sharpen up with small curving lines here and there. Work over the distant hills finally with light blue, leaving touches of the existing colours showing. there are also tiny touches of blue on the ground under the left-hand tree, which subtly suggest shadow.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2002/vg_final_step.JPG

Here is a detail of the sky:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2002/sky_section.JPG

Van Gogh painted this image late in 1889, the final year of his life, while a patient in an asylum. It seems reasonable to assume that the turbulent movement in the image echoes the turmoil in his mind. Perhaps you might feel sympathy with this as you work.

Here is a Cezane "copy", which gave me an opportunity to use broken colour to give a similar effect to Cezanne's short, choppy brush strokes. It was fun to do, too.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2002/cezanne.JPG

I hope there is a beginner or two out there who might find this exercise useful.

Jackie
..............................................................
do visit my ebay page and auctions (http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/jackie4art/.)

visit my website which has a “troubleshooter” page of helpful pastel tips and hints (http://www.jackiesimmonds.co.uk)

Also see my posts in The Artists Marketplace here at WC!