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Karen Cardinal
03-11-2004, 10:09 PM
Someone sent me an email today asking a very good (and commonly heard) question...
"I am making the transition from graphite to colored pencils. I can blend wonderful tones with my graphite pencils, but I can't figure out how to do it with these colored pencils. Can you help?"
Having been a former graphite artist (who still likes to dabble in it), I can understand the frustration, so I thought I'd put together a simple list of techniques and tools you can use to help you blend your colors in case anyone else had this question as well.

You will notice that the techniques are the same as you would use in graphite. I have included them because most likely you will "blend" your colors simply in the way you lay down your lines.

(btw: If anyone wants to add anything to this, or correct any mistakes... feel free to jump in)

*Note - A couple of these definitions are from the lesson Colored pencil techniques (http://elfwood.lysator.liu.se/farp/cptech/) by Tiffanie L. Gray posted at Elfwood. It's a really good explination of the basics of colored pencils!

Pencil Techniques

Crosshatch
Lay down short strokes in a vertical and then cross with horizontal strokes. Successive layers build up color and smoothness.

Parallel Lines
Make long or short diagonal, horizontal or vertical strokes. Keep all the strokes going in the same direction

Directional Lines
Just as the name implies, your lines are drawn to suggest direction. This is most commonly used in hair and fur, but can be used anytime you want to emphasise a direction for the eye to follow.

Pointilism
Using either a sharp or dull pencil, tap the lead on the surface rapidly to leave a small amount of color in a dot. If you hold the pencil at a bit of an angle it makes a short line. If many different colors are dotted into an area it can cause the eye to mix the colors, without them actually being mixed. Usually gives a "soft" look to the picture

Circulism
A technique created by Maggie Toole where you draw thousands of overlapping, intertwined circles of varying colors and sizes.
See Maggie's Lesson on Circulism (http://cpchallenge.com/lessons/MaggieToole/) for more info
Also see chatfieldstudios' circulism artworks for some fabulous examples

Scumbling
Use a very sharp point and extremely light pressure to move the pencil point in a circular motion, slightly overlapping as you move along. This works extreemely well on skin, clothing, or any place where you do not want it to appear shiny. This is a very time consuming method, but is well worth the effort.

Burnishing
Technically: Overlaying color with increasing pressure until the tooth of the paper is filled and a smooth surface is attained.
How it's usually done: A light color is layered over a darker color with heavy pressure to blend the colors together. This is usually done near the very end of the work when the tooth of the paper is almost filled. It's best to use this method only in places where you want to give the appearance of a shiny surface.


Tools for Blending

Blender Pencil
Will blend your colors together without adding any color of it's own. Great tool for small areas, but impossibly tedious for any large area.

Blender Marker
Works as a solvent that can be easily controlled. It can change the color of the pencil, so it's best to test it before using it on your work.

Erasers
Erasers such as the cheap pink plastic school erasers or (my favorite) the crayon eraser can be used to push and blend the colors into each other.

Solvents
Used for colored pencils with a wax binder (such as Prismacolor pencils) They work by destroying the wax binding the pigments, allowing them to move on the paper until they dry. Different solvents act in different ways. The also can dramatically change the color of the pencil.

Water
Of course, this only works with watercolor pencils (which I plan to try one day).

Tortillions, paper towels and the like
These are what I was used to using to blend pencil strokes together when I worked with graphite. Unfortunately, they aren't as efficient with colored pencils. The one exception I've seen that can be blended successfully this way is the "Col Erase" brand colored pencils.


There is more information about blending in the Hall of Fame (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=919632). Look toward the bottom of the page under "TECHNIQUES", "Burnishing, Blending & Solvents".

Hope this helps to answer your question. If not let me know and I'll try again. :D

Here are some example images of these techniques. The simplistic pictures are just designed to give you a quick example of the term. To really see these techniques, you should browse through the works here in the cp forum and see how many different ones you can identify.

Troy Rochford
03-11-2004, 10:32 PM
Hey Karen I have a question about that, and thanks for posting this, btw!

My approach to graphite is constantly changing, and most recently my technique has kind of evolved into something that I can't really explain clearly. I abandoned all of the above techniques and just kind of started building my values by either a controlled, very short (like an eighth of an inch or smaller) sort of back and forth scribble stroke with an extremely light touch, or contour lines wiht the same light touch. I just tried that on one portrait for the hell of it, and I surprised myself by coming up with an extremely soft, realistic looking skin texture. The link below is for the second pic I did using that unorthodox approach. The scanner kind of washed out the pic and lightened a lot of the values, but I think you can still get the idea.

Anyway, if you have any suggestions on how to apply that approach to CP, or if you would advise against it, please speak up!!! I'm just about done with the line drawing for my first cp portrait, and I need all the advice I can get before I start trying to pull off a realistic skin tone!

Here's that pic, so you can see what Im talking about. It's the Lopez portrait on this page.
http://hometown.aol.com/orenthal01/graphite.html

Karen Cardinal
03-11-2004, 10:43 PM
Well it sounds like you already have the skills to sucessfully do the same thing in colored pencils... control and a light touch.

Your technique sounds great and looking at your portrait, you do it very well! I'm not nearly so controlled with my scribbles. ;)
I don't see any reason why your technique wouldn't work just as well with colored pencils. As I said, blending sometimes comes from the way you lay down your lines.

btw: That list by no means encompasses every technique or tool. I think it's a good starting point and I'd love to see other artists add their own ideas to it!

Have fun with your work!
I'll be looking forward to seeing what you post! :D

Troy Rochford
03-11-2004, 10:59 PM
Well it sounds like you already have the skills to sucessfully do the same thing in colored pencils... control and a light touch.

Your technique sounds great and looking at your portrait, you do it very well! I'm not nearly so controlled with my scribbles. ;)
I don't see any reason why your technique wouldn't work just as well with colored pencils. As I said, blending sometimes comes from the way you lay down your lines.

btw: That list by no means encompasses every technique or tool. I think it's a good starting point and I'd love to see other artists add their own ideas to it!

Have fun with your work!
I'll be looking forward to seeing what you post! :D


Thanks Karen! I may post something tomorrow, depending on how things go with this tonight. I have never had so little confidence at the beginning of a project!!!

arlene
03-11-2004, 11:47 PM
Karen I'm sorry but I'm going to have to disagree with you on several points.
You will notice that the techniques are the same as you would use in graphite. I have included them because most likely you will "blend" your colors simply in the way you lay down your lines.

No the techniques are not the same. You can't erase like in graphite, and you can't blend the same way. There really is no such thing as "smudging" for example.



Parallel Lines
Make long or short diagonal, horizontal or vertical strokes. Keep all the strokes going in the same direction

to get even color one has to lay the lines down with the same light pressure, with a very sharp pencil, and with the lines very close together.

Pointilism
Using either a sharp or dull pencil, tap the lead on the surface rapidly to leave a small amount of color in a dot. If you hold the pencil at a bit of an angle it makes a short line. If many different colors are dotted into an area it can cause the eye to mix the colors, without them actually being mixed. Usually gives a "soft" look to the picture

And this works great as long as you're not planning on blending later on...for example it's almost impossible to do this with just light pressure...

Scumbling
Use a very sharp point and extremely light pressure to move the pencil point in a circular motion, slightly overlapping as you move along. This works extreemely well on skin, clothing, or any place where you do not want it to appear shiny. This is a very time consuming method, but is well worth the effort.

The circular motion is almost miniscule to start. This works everywhere, not just skin and clothing...and you are 100% wrong about it not being a good method if you want it shiny. I basically only use this technique, my work is shiny where it's supposed to be shiny, and it's all a matter of building up enough layers. This will give you the smoothest surface and the most even tones of all the methods. My sugar/creamer was done with this method and it is shiny looking.

Burnishing
Technically: Overlaying color with increasing pressure until the tooth of the paper is filled and a smooth surface is attained.
How it's usually done: A light color is layered over a darker color with heavy pressure to blend the colors together. This is usually done near the very end of the work when the tooth of the paper is almost filled. It's best to use this method only in places where you want to give the appearance of a shiny surface.

that's one way to do it...not my preferred method. by doing that you're lightening the color you want. a better method is to use the colorless blender. And again it's not only for shiny looks...my curtains don't look shiny and i used the colorless blender and burnished them.

and when one says the paper should be almost filled...it should be so filled that if you left it as is, it would be fine. what the burnishing does is blend all the layers together to give it a rich look.

Tools for Blending

Blender Pencil
Will blend your colors together without adding any color of it's own. Great tool for small areas, but impossibly tedious for any large area.

it's not "impossibly tedious" at all...it's like adding another layer, and it goes fairly quickly

Erasers
Erasers such as the cheap pink plastic school erasers or (my favorite) the crayon eraser can be used to push and blend the colors into each other.

I'd be very leary of this method as it can create smears and mud if you're not careful.

Tortillions, paper towels and the like
These are what I was used to using to blend pencil strokes together when I worked with graphite. Unfortunately, they aren't as efficient with colored pencils. The one exception I've seen that can be blended successfully this way is the "Col Erase" brand colored pencils.

Leanne does use these. She also recommended the 100% cotton pads used for make up. I've been using it on When Time Stopped and have found it to be excellent.

arlene
03-11-2004, 11:51 PM
Hey Karen I have a question about that, and thanks for posting this, btw!

My approach to graphite is constantly changing, and most recently my technique has kind of evolved into something that I can't really explain clearly. I abandoned all of the above techniques and just kind of started building my values by either a controlled, very short (like an eighth of an inch or smaller) sort of back and forth scribble stroke with an extremely light touch, or contour lines wiht the same light touch. I just tried that on one portrait for the hell of it, and I surprised myself by coming up with an extremely soft, realistic looking skin texture. The link below is for the second pic I did using that unorthodox approach. The scanner kind of washed out the pic and lightened a lot of the values, but I think you can still get the idea.

Anyway, if you have any suggestions on how to apply that approach to CP, or if you would advise against it, please speak up!!! I'm just about done with the line drawing for my first cp portrait, and I need all the advice I can get before I start trying to pull off a realistic skin tone!

Here's that pic, so you can see what Im talking about. It's the Lopez portrait on this page.
http://hometown.aol.com/orenthal01/graphite.html

to build up layers for contouring one should use light pressure and an even stroke.

arlene
03-11-2004, 11:58 PM
for the record, i've found that the colorless pencil used at the end does the best job of blending.

Troy Rochford
03-12-2004, 12:08 AM
to build up layers for contouring one should use light pressure and an even stroke.


Ummmm, so... would you agree with Karen on the point that my general approach as described above can also work for colors then?

[email protected]!
troy

arlene
03-12-2004, 12:12 AM
yes because i think that's what you're doing already is building up light layers, right?

Troy Rochford
03-12-2004, 12:34 AM
YES! Time consuming as all hell, but I think it pays off. Hopefully it will translate over to color as well. Im working on my green grisaille right now for the portrait I'm doing.

Elankat
03-12-2004, 01:09 AM
Leanne does use these. She also recommended the 100% cotton pads used for make up. I've been using it on When Time Stopped and have found it to be excellent.

Yep. In fact, a #5 stump is my preferred blending tool when using all Prismacolor pencils. Cotton cosmetic rounds are another common tool for me. I use toilet paper and paper towels for certain blend and lift techniques.

Karen Cardinal
03-12-2004, 01:27 AM
Thank you for your help here Arlene.

I wanted to begin by pointing out that the type of stokes you use putting your lines down are really no different in colored pencil than they would be in graphite.
I'm sorry I worded that part badly. I agree that erasing is very different and the only time I really "smudge" my colored pencil is when I'm not careful about where I lay my hand. ;)

Not meaning to be argumentitive, but if I'm doing a work in Pointilism, I wouldn't be planning on blending.

Again, I have obviously used the incorrect term when I said "shiny". It's true that you can give the appearance of a shiny surface (or dull surface, or any surface you like) with any of the techniques if you put in the right values. I'm not sure what the right wording would be to say that burnishing (putting your pencil on heavy enough to flatten the tooth of the paper) will give that area a glossier look than scumbling.

The "impossibly tedious" comment about the blender pencil may just be my own view... sorry again! I've simply found easier, quicker ways to blend large areas of color.

I just love using erasers to blend. Of course, it's all a matter of what you've experimented with and enjoy doing.

I hadn't seen a demo of using tortillians or towels to blend any cps other than Col Erase. If you or LeAnne would like to show us how to do it, that would be great!

Troy Rochford
03-12-2004, 01:44 AM
Hey Karen check your email when you can! Thanks!

wet
03-12-2004, 10:17 AM
I love tortillions to blend even large areas. It's so theraputic and I am always amazed such a simple tool can do such a great job. wanda

EyeCon
03-12-2004, 03:20 PM
Karen:

Just wanted to indicate my thanks to artists like yourself who take the time to be so generous with their knowledge and concern for those of us who are least experienced, and yet burning with desire to create what is in their hearts and minds; this was an excellent presentation on a subject that has had me stumped...I am going to gladly add this presentation of yours to my collection of reference material...thanks Karen!


Regards,
Eyecon, a.k.a.
John V. Stevenson

Karen Cardinal
03-12-2004, 11:40 PM
Thank you so much John! I am thrilled that you found this useful!
Sometimes I'm sure I'm the only one that wants to hear myself talk. :rolleyes:

btw: I've asked an expert to have a look at this for me, so they can help me word this in a less confusing way. I'll post the updated text when I get it done if anyone's interested.

Ohhhh... and I have a request for those of you who use tortillions with your wax based pencils. Could someone please show us a demo of how to actually blend the wax pencils with a tortillion! Thanks! :D


Karen:

Just wanted to indicate my thanks to artists like yourself who take the time to be so generous with their knowledge and concern for those of us who are least experienced, and yet burning with desire to create what is in their hearts and minds; this was an excellent presentation on a subject that has had me stumped...I am going to gladly add this presentation of yours to my collection of reference material...thanks Karen!


Regards,
Eyecon, a.k.a.
John V. Stevenson

Jazz
03-13-2004, 12:18 AM
Hiya! Karen :clap: :::waving from dark England:::

I also wanted to add my heartfelt thanks to you for taking the time to type all that up and provide us with some basic examples, I also noted that you wrote that your list was not exhaustive and that others could add any other techniques they had found, with regards that I wanted to reply by saying it is refreshing to say the least to see that written by someone with over ten years experience with colour pencil and who is open and not feeling the need to lord it over any of us newbies -who knows in a few weeks I might just have a home made technique to add to the list, LOL and it is gratifying to know that it wont be dismissed as rubbish just because I am new to CP's, as you know I am not new to art in general.

Thank you Karen :) ,



Much love and Hugs,


ALI

gealflings
03-13-2004, 11:32 AM
Hello Karen!! Thanks for this thread - it's nice to have everything all put together in one spot like this.

I'd really like to know more about the whole eraser thing - I know you use it successfully in all of your pieces without creating mud, so I'd like to know how you do it.

I use the blending pencil most of the time, but I just started playing with black paper (a small thing.. still those christmas cards that I'm now 3 months behind on..LOL), and the blending pencil isn't working for me - it's making everything SO dark, so I've been blending with white and cream and overlaying with color afterwards. I can't use tortillions or makeup puffs, or paper towels, or whatever because I get the willies even thinking about it. The feel of something coarse rubbing against something smooth makes me shudder. I'm a freak, I know it. :D The blending pencil almost does it to me.

The thing to remember in threads like these is that there is really no 'absolute' method for everyone. Saying 'you're wrong' or whatever doesn't work as everyone is different, people have weird little ideosyncracies (like my whole no rubbing thing), maybe haven't figured out a way to make a technique work and so are working on something else, etc. Everything posted is personal opinion from personal experience. Maybe I like to blend with a monkey butt and banana peel and it works wonderfully for me. I can't say that anyone else's technique is wrong, it's just wrong for me. Since I joined wetcanvas, I've spent a lot of time trying not to offend anyone (seeing as I'm pretty brash and relatively offensive by nature.. maybe I should bathe more...LOL), but I see so much of the whole 'no, you're wrong' ideal, everywhere, not just here in CP, that it makes me worry. There's a fine line between criticism and constructive criticism, and it usually involves saying "hey, i like that you did this" before diving in with the "I don't like this." I see people that get offended and are afraid to say anything, and people like me who work on the fringes of this tightly-knit group and feel like it's not their place to say anything. I know people are busy and have much to do, but tossing in a 'Thanks for all the work you put in doing this' doesn't really take much time, does it?

Anyway. I'm done.

Thanks Karen :)

frida
03-13-2004, 12:22 PM
Just wanted to remind you, Karen, that you promised once to show us how you use the eraser to blend, but somehow forgot to scan/photograph stages and we missed it. Can you just do a sample of the process and add it to this thread?

I really appreciate all the info you provided. Most of us (except those who have taken a CP workshop or more) have never seen someone else handle the pencils, but in books. I am close to have the treat of watching Arlene, but how I incorporate in my work her or your technique is an absolutely personal matter. I remain open to all of them...! Above all, I will adopt those I have tried and feel comfortable to the way my hands move, or like it happens to Sarah, that don't make my teeth quiver! :D

Thanks!

Elankat
03-13-2004, 01:08 PM
Ohhhh... and I have a request for those of you who use tortillions with your wax based pencils. Could someone please show us a demo of how to actually blend the wax pencils with a tortillion! Thanks! :D

I'm not using tortillions. I use stumps. They are smoother, harder, and hold up well over time. I keep several on hand for main color groups (i.e., greens, blues, purples, blacks, light flesh tones, dark flesh tones) because the pencil stains the stump and it builds up a wax like coating. I also keep clean ones on hand. I don't like using the stump with oil based pencils because more color is removed. I use stumps with Prismas.

You rub the stump over the area where you want to blend just as you would a pencil. The effect is very similar to a colorless blender pencil, but you have more surface with the stump and it goes quicker.

For a cotton round, it's the same thing. You hold the cotton round or cotton ball in your hand and rub over the area you want to blend. It imparts a softly blending look. It will remove just a bit of color and will blend without imparting a waxy look to the burnishing.

*shrug*
Not much to it. I'm not even sure how to go about photographing or doing a demo for it. :eek:

Charlie's Mum
03-13-2004, 04:51 PM
I'd just like to add my thanks to Karen - and the others who have contributed.
Although I've been drawing for many years, cps were always thought of as "no-nos", a school implement for maps etc! Well, I've recently discovered their "other side" and any tips I can pick up allow me to try, and make up my own mind. I admire what more experienced colourists can do but it may not always suit me.
I think it is incredibly generous of all the talented artists in the WC! community to give of their time and knowledge to allow the rest of us to try to catch up!!
So, to Karen and anyone else who helps, a huge "thank you"!
:D :D

CarrieLLewis
03-13-2004, 05:55 PM
Again, I have obviously used the incorrect term when I said "shiny". It's true that you can give the appearance of a shiny surface (or dull surface, or any surface you like) with any of the techniques if you put in the right values. I'm not sure what the right wording would be to say that burnishing (putting your pencil on heavy enough to flatten the tooth of the paper) will give that area a glossier look than scumbling.

Karen,

I understood your comments about shininess to mean the look of the surface, but that's probably because I noticed only yesterday how glossy the color surface on "Siesta Time" is if veiwed from the side. In fact, I noticed some very interesting patterns, almost similar to the lights and darks in crushed velvet, where the pencil strokes went in different directions. It gave the color layer an almost 'painterly' look and it was, to be honest, quite fascinating.

By the way, Karen, the point of that was to say that no matter how badly you may think you worded things, I understood it. Now what that says about us, I'm not sure...

I don't think it will be visible under glass, though, and it may even be knocked down when I varnish the finished piece. :p

arlene
03-13-2004, 11:26 PM
The thing to remember in threads like these is that there is really no 'absolute' method for everyone. Saying 'you're wrong' or whatever doesn't work as everyone is different, people have weird little ideosyncracies (like my whole no rubbing thing), maybe haven't figured out a way to make a technique work and so are working on something else, etc.

First of all no one said she was wrong. REREAD WHAT I WROTE. I said I had to disagree, and i gave my reasons....why is that a problem?

as for everyone having different methods, yes, but karen was putting these up as absolutes for beginneres...there's enough for them to learn without haviing misinformation, such as using the brillo method doesn't work with shiny objects.

As for the pads mentioned, they are such soft cotton and you barely rub (if you do, you rub off pigment) that You might want to try the method.

arlene
03-13-2004, 11:27 PM
Not meaning to be argumentitive, but if I'm doing a work in Pointilism, I wouldn't be planning on blending.


nope not argumentative...i'm just making sure that newbies understand...sometimes we as people who've been working in the medium assume everyone else understands. :)

arlene
03-14-2004, 02:00 AM
First of all no one said she was wrong. REREAD WHAT I WROTE. I said I had to disagree, and i gave my reasons....why is that a problem?

as for everyone having different methods, yes, but karen was putting these up as absolutes for beginneres...there's enough for them to learn without haviing misinformation, such as using the brillo method doesn't work with shiny objects.

As for the pads mentioned, they are such soft cotton and you barely rub (if you do, you rub off pigment) that You might want to try the method.


if this is the quote you meant and you are 100% wrong about it not being a good method if you want it shiny.

i wasn't saying the technique was wrong, only her assessment about it not being a good method to get shiny. so again where did i say that?

gealflings
03-14-2004, 10:07 AM
Look - You don't need to freakin' yell at me. I read it repeatedly. I didn't mean to quote you, if that's what I did. I was speaking generally. Like I said, it's something I see all over the place *not just here*, and it hit me on this post to the point that I had to say something. Like I said in my post, there's something to be said for a little 'thanks for posting this!' in the beginning, then rip it apart as much as you want to. That's all. It's a prevalent problem, has come up before, you're certainly not the only one or even close to the worst one, yadda yadda yadda. People respect you and respect your methods - sometimes a little sugar coating works wonders. That's all I was saying.

I appreciate that you removed that last line from your reply, but it still showed up in the email update. Should I be taking that as a dig towards me personally? Just curious.

Besides, my post wasn't aimed totally at you arlene, which is why I was speaking so generally. I'm not afraid to point specifics out when I think they're wrong, and I would have quoted you if there was something specific.

:)

Elankat
03-14-2004, 10:51 AM
Before this thread starts running in a direction that Karen didn't intend, I'd just like to step in. Everyone has their opinions and a right to express them, however, I'd ask people to keep on topic.

No. I'm not pointing fingers at anybody. I'd just like to see this thread continue with discussion of techniques and not get off track. :)

arlene
03-14-2004, 11:18 AM
I won't even respond to this, except to say if i was yelling I'D BE USING CAPS LIKE THIS.

Karen Cardinal
03-14-2004, 04:56 PM
Thank you so much everyone for your "thank you"s and comments!
It is such a thrill to know that someone feels like they've benefited from my advice!

I will put together a quick demo on my technique with using erasers to blend (or as my friend the expert says "moosh") the colors together. I'll try to get it done tomorrow. :D

btw: Sarah, I don't know if I should be worried or not, but I am glad to hear that you understood what I ment. It seems one of the hardest parts of creating a tutorial is getting the phrasing right so it won't mean completely different things to different people. I have always had trouble with that. :rolleyes:

Thank you so much again everyone!

Keep having fun with it all!

Karen Cardinal
03-14-2004, 06:05 PM
Big oops!
I'm so sorry Ali! I definately wasn't trying to ignore you! I'm just a complete skatterbrain sometimes. :rolleyes: ;)

I am really looking forward to seeing your method! I'm always on the lookout for a new technique to steal. :evil: :D

btw: Anyone else who would like to add their techniques for blending colors, feel free to add them here!

LeAnne, sorry I also forgot to thank you for the explination of your technique... so Thank You! :D

bearded bob
03-15-2004, 10:01 AM
I think this is a really valuable thread and just want to say thanks to Karen for kicking it off. It showed very quickly that different artists have different ways of doing things - which of course we all knew - but it also highlights for me one of the biggest problems with our medium. We don't agree on what the terms mean. In watercolour, everyone knows what a graduated wash is, or a cauliflower, or a glaze. But just what IS layering? How is it different from Blending? When does layering become burnishing?

If you add several light layers of colour you are blending colour. Your eyes do the blending for you. Step back and you will see one colour which is the sum of all of the layers you have added. It might take a lens to see the individual colours again.

Some people use stumps or torchons or tortillons ( LeAnne I always thought they were the same thing?) to push the colours into each other even more. Others use blender pencils. Or blender pens. Or solvents. Or the back of a spoon. Or fingers. This is called blending? Except when it is called smearing or smudging :)

And apparently if you do this with a very heavy pressure it is called something else again - burnishing.

Sorry, but as an ex-scientist I find all of this confusing, and I have read every book on cp and really studied it for 6 years. No wonder newcomers are confused!

Elankat
03-15-2004, 10:31 AM
You're very welcome Karen. :)


Bob, I'm not sure if it's the same everywhere, but at my local art stores, tortillons and stumps are different things. Over at Dick Blick, you can see the difference between the two.

Stumps and Tortillons (http://www.dickblick.com/itemgroups-t/tortillons/)

Basically, a tortillon is made of paper that's wound in a spiral. A stump is also made of spiral paper, but it is pressed and formed into a solid mass. It's solid enough that it can even be sharpened with a pencil sharpener or sandpapered (common ways to clean it). Stumps also have points on both ends. I like the stumps because they are very smooth and hold up well, since the larger sizes are as sturdy as a pencil. I prefer #4 and #5 sizes.

As far as burnishing goes, I've always thought of burnishing as anything that deals with rubbing, especially if it yields a glossy finish.

bur·nish tr.v. bur·nished, bur·nish·ing, bur·nish·es
1. To make smooth or glossy by or as if by rubbing; polish.
2. To rub with a tool that serves especially to smooth or polish.

I almost never use heavy pressure on my pieces. A medium pressure is about as hard as it gets. The stump does not require much pressure to create a glossy look. I know The Colored Pencil Solution Book talks about using heavy pressure, but I've never found it necessary with a colorless blender or a stump. Medium to light pressure has always worked fine for me. Then again, maybe my medium pressure is another person's heavy pressure. :confused: :D

In my mind, it's burnishing if it involves rubbing or a tool and yields a smooth, polished, or glossy look...regardless of pressure. To me, blending is when layers of colors are visually mixing on their own or when extremely light rubbing is used that just blends the layers a little bit. But that's just how I think of it. Not sure what the prevailing expert opinion is among the book authors & teachers. :)

pinkrybns
03-15-2004, 10:43 AM
bur·nish tr.v. bur·nished, bur·nish·ing, bur·nish·es
1. To make smooth or glossy by or as if by rubbing; polish.
2. To rub with a tool that serves especially to smooth or polish.

In my mind, it's burnishing if it involves rubbing or a tool and yields a smooth, polished, or glossy look...regardless of pressure.

To me, blending is when layers of colors are visually mixing on their own or when extremely light rubbing is used that just blends the layers a little bit. But that's just how I think of it.

Well, that's how I think of it as well.

Burnishing is making use of the wax in the waxy CP's to bring up a visible shine in the final layer, and not always everywhere in a CP painting - but of course that can be done too. Depends on what look you're after in the end....right?

Again I agree with LeAnne ( and anyone else who said this before...not looking at the whole thread again...lol): Blending to me means blending colors with colors, more a subtle mixing, not necessarily to make the final layer a "shiny" one.

Bob! What's the deal with the back of a spoon?!? Can you elaborate on that? I only ever did that when making clay pots - like the Hopi Indians do to get a super shiny black surface on the pit-fired ware.

bearded bob
03-15-2004, 11:05 AM
Thanks LeAnne - I do know what you mean about the different rolls of card, but maybe its a Brit thing, or maybe its just my ignorance, but I have always called both kinds torchons (which is just an Anglicisation of the French tortillon).

LeAnne, if you never use a heavy pressure, then isn't what you do with stumps blending, not burnishing? See what I mean?? It is very confusing! And Gary Greene and other artists mean something totally different by burnishing. On your definition if you lay down a lot of colour, then rub with a cotton bud this is burnishing. I like your definitions though, and I can agree with you that the amount of pressure you use is probably the critical factor. But how do you explain that to a newbie? OK - now you are blending - but Watch Out! Now you are burnishing, you naughty person!!

Judy, the back of a spoon works for burnishing - it does flatten the tooth considerably though, so is a last resort!! But then a burnishing tool - metal ball on a pen holder - does the same.

All I am trying to say is that peple blend in different ways, and burnishing means different things to different people. Which makes it really hard to tell newbies this is THE way to do it. All we can ever say is what works for us.

frida
03-15-2004, 12:30 PM
From Mike Sibleys' website:
"Stumps and Tortillons... Stumps are generally double-ended, larger and bulkier than the finer single-ended tortillons. Both have their individual uses although I tend to use only tortillons..." He works with graphite, but the tools are the same.

Blending for me is also easing one colour into another with a light hand. However, I found using some Prisma colours that are softer than others (eg. Clay Rose), I can unify (blend) other colours by moving the pigments around, which they do thanks to their special softness. Following a demo on hair in Ann Kullbergs' portrait book, I was amazed at the result I got with that particular colour.

I have no experience on burnishing at all. Parts of some of my pieces could be called burnished, I guess, because due to the addition of many layers they became shiny, but it just happened! :) Cannot say I had intended to burnish...

Karen Cardinal
03-16-2004, 09:18 AM
I want to thank Bob (and LeAnne and Judy and Raquel) for taking this thread in exactly the right direction! I really didn't realize how much difference there was in our termanology myself.

I want to add some more to this thread very soon. I'm unable to at the moment, but I hope everyone keeps relating their own views of what these terms mean and how they are achieved.

Since I did promise this, I will quickly add my information about the erasers.
I will try to get back to this as soon as I can.
Thank you everyone for your great comments and valuable information!


Quick demo on using eraser to "blend"

The first picture shows a simple ball that has a few (more than 6 less than a dozen) layers of colors.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Mar-2004/1325-1.jpg

This is what the same drawing looks like after the colors have been pushed around with a crayon eraser. The pencil strokes become "fuzzier" and less of the white of the paper is showing through now.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Mar-2004/1325-2.jpg

You can keep building up layers and "blend" them together with your eraser to give your piece more depth and smoother transitions between values.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Mar-2004/1325-3.jpg

If you want to keep some line work in your piece you can also use your eraser on bottom layers and cover those over with unblended layers of pencil. This will give you a soft even base under your lines.


Some of the reasons I "blend" with a crayon eraser:

I can blend a large area fairly quickly

The tip of the eraser is narrow, so I can get into small areas.

Not only can I blend (or push) my colors together, but it's great for softening edges to add depth to parts of the picture.


Hints about using erasers:

In order to keep from contaminating your colors and creating "mud" always rub the eraser on scrap paper to get rid of excess color as you blend. Don't worry about wearing down the eraser. I've been using mine for well over a year and it barely looks like I've touched it.

The harder you push, the more you will smudge your color. Sometimes this is exactly what you want.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Mar-2004/1325-4.jpg

Always test and experiment with a new technique before trying it out on an important work!

If you have any question, go ahead and ask. I'll try to get back to answer anything as quickly as possible.

Thanks again everyone!
Keep having fun!

arlene
03-16-2004, 09:36 AM
thanks for the demo karen...but is a crayon eraser the same as a regular eraser? because i've found blending with a regular eraser creates shmears and mud.

Karen Cardinal
03-16-2004, 09:47 AM
thanks for the demo karen...but is a crayon eraser the same as a regular eraser? because i've found blending with a regular eraser creates shmears and mud.

Hey Arlene!

Well the erasers I've actually used are the crayon eraser and a plastic eraser (the kind you get at the drug store for your kids to use at school).

I've found that I can be quite brutal with either one of those on my work as long as I remember to constantly erase the color they've picked up onto a scrap paper. I forgot to add that you will also want to keep your brush (or paper towel) handy to constantly brush eraser crumbs off your peice.

I've heard that there are great effects you can create using other types of erasers, but I haven't gone out to buy any other types yet. That would probably make for some fun experiments though, so I may just be going down to the local office supply store to go eraser shopping soon. ;)

Thanks again!

frida
03-16-2004, 10:28 AM
Than you Karen!!! :D That's exactly the kind of demo I wanted to see, step-by-step and showing the differences...

I am not clear either about what a "crayon eraser" is. I've looked where they sell crayons for kiddies, but couldn't find an eraser for them!

I clean my eraser a different way. When I am at the drawing board, I do it on the side of my chair, LOL...! I sit on an office chair, and since the fabric is attached, I only need one hand for a quick movement along. If I used paper I would have to be holding it with the other hand, and it wouldn't do such a good job as the tight fabric does. The chair is grey, so I figure if I do that for another 25 years maybe it'll start showing. When I am in the kitchen, I use the rough parts underneath the IKEA table or chairs... That wears it out faster, but after all, it's only an eraser...!

Karen Cardinal
03-16-2004, 10:43 AM
Thank you Raquel!

Love your solution with the eraser! Anytime you can save yourself additional steps in art it's a good thing! :D
btw: Whenever I work with acrylics, I wear a paint shirt and pants that I wipe my brushes on between strokes. I don't really do it for any other reason other than I think it's fun. ;) :D

Sorry, I keep forgetting to put the links to the crayon eraser. :rolleyes:

Here's a little info about it at the CP Challenge: http://cpchallenge.com/links/crayoneraser.html

I don't think Ann is stocking up on these anymore. (although she might still have some. You could ask her and see)
You can get them by the bulk at Oriental Trading Company (http://www.orientaltrading.com/otcweb/application?namespace=browse&origin=searchMain.jsp&event=link.itemDetails&demandPrefix=12&sku=9/39&mode=Searching&searchDestinationJSP=/search/searchMain.jsp) (item number IN-9/39)

If you don't want to buy 6 dozen of them, let me know and I can get some and send them out to anyone who wants one.

Than you Karen!!! :D That's exactly the kind of demo I wanted to see, step-by-step and showing the differences...

I am not clear either about what a "crayon eraser" is. I've looked where they sell crayons for kiddies, but couldn't find an eraser for them!

I clean my eraser a different way. When I am at the drawing board, I do it on the side of my chair, LOL...! I sit on an office chair, and since the fabric is attached, I only need one hand for a quick movement along. If I used paper I would have to be holding it with the other hand, and it wouldn't do such a good job as the tight fabric does. The chair is grey, so I figure if I do that for another 25 years maybe it'll start showing. When I am in the kitchen, I use the rough parts underneath the IKEA table or chairs... That wears it out faster, but after all, it's only an eraser...!

EyeCon
03-16-2004, 12:06 PM
Re: Answering a question about blending...


To: Karen, Arlene and all the rest of CP contributors to this topic, my heartfelt thanks, I'm more than ready to begin my Father's portrait, I know all of you have solved my blending difficulties and I can face that god awful blank, white paper with more confidence!!!..Now, as soon as I can learn how to post my WIP, I will gladly share my work, especially now that Karen assures there is no place for shyness on this fabulous forum...Ha, Ha, Ha!..I no longer have a scanner, the thing went kapoot... I'll have to find a way to post my work.


Thanks again everybody for all your efforts, I am surrounded by artists and loving every minute of it.

P.S. I'm in the middle of doing a wall mural in my garage, I don't know how I can share this with everyone, but I'm really excited about...it's a landscape.



Love and Best regards to all,
Eyecon, a.k.a.
John Stevenson

larsnip
03-16-2004, 01:21 PM
Karen - Great thread, Sorry I picked up on it so late :( I also am a Graphite Artist that moved to CP.
I use "Smudging" all the time in CP, I use my fingers, they get very dirty with color sometimes :D
I also use an eraser in CP to cut out areas, but granted its mostly to remove color not to let the paper show. But basicly thats what you are doing with graphite
I have never used a blending pencil, don't own one, I do all my blending with Colored pencils I don't want to dilute the wonderful color :p
I do use sovents on Backgrounds only though

Dave Larson

Meisie
03-16-2004, 01:31 PM
Thank you all for the excellent info here. I'm off to vote as I really feel this ought to be in the HOF for future reference! :D

Meisie

Elankat
03-16-2004, 02:05 PM
Karen - Great thread, Sorry I picked up on it so late :( I also am a Graphite Artist that moved to CP.
I use "Smudging" all the time in CP, I use my fingers, they get very dirty with color sometimes :D
I also use an eraser in CP to cut out areas, but granted its mostly to remove color not to let the paper show. But basicly thats what you are doing with graphite
I have never used a blending pencil, don't own one, I do all my blending with Colored pencils I don't want to dilute the wonderful color :p
I do use sovents on Backgrounds only though

Dave Larson

Hey Dave. The colorless blending pencils are actually just wax or oil base without any pigment added to it. It doesn't dilute or frost the color like white or a similar light color.

Karen, thanks for posting a link to the crayon eraser. I wasn't sure what it was either. I will probably be teaching some preschool art classes soon, so I may just buy 6 dozen. If I do, I'll make some available to others.

arlene
03-16-2004, 02:10 PM
i'd be interested in them

pinkrybns
03-16-2004, 03:04 PM
If you don't want to buy 6 dozen of them, let me know and I can get some and send them out to anyone who wants one.

OH, oh, oh.....
Would you also send some to Holland? I'd be interested in getting a hold of these.
I'll send you chocolate, I swear, just ask Arlene....

Karen Cardinal
03-16-2004, 03:26 PM
John, I'm glad to hear you're going to be posting your work! No reason at all to be shy here. :D Do you have a camera? There are a lot of people here who could give you great pointers for photographing your artwork.

Dave, I've used smudging on my cp work too... although it usually wasn't on purpose. ;) Thanks so much for sharing your methods! It's so much fun to see all the different techniques that that we can use to create our works!

LeAnne, Arlene, Judy & everyone else, I'll go ahead and order some erasers today and anyone who wants some can go ahead and pm me so I can send them out. Judy, I'll send them to Holland especially since you mentioned chocolate. :D

pinkrybns
03-16-2004, 04:06 PM
This is gonna be one majorly stoooopid question, but here goes:

Why are those caryon erasers in different colors - does each different color effect the erasing ( as in do you have to use the green one for green things?) or are they just colored for fun?

See I told you it was a stooopid question.

Karen Cardinal
03-16-2004, 04:11 PM
Yes they are different colors, but the color of the erasers don't make any difference in how they erase. They're all exactly the same.

It really wasn't a stooopid question at all!

Oh and btw... no... you cannot request certain colors... (unless they send me a good variety of all the colors). :D

TheDuck
03-16-2004, 05:20 PM
I would also be interested in getting my hands on some of those crayon erasers. I assume the dyed erasers don't affect the colors your blending at all... I'm kind of new to CP, so is this technically blending or burnishing? Hehe just trying to rile up that British fella :)

peglatt
03-16-2004, 07:23 PM
Thank you for your help here Arlene.

I wanted to begin by pointing out that the type of stokes you use putting your lines down are really no different in colored pencil than they would be in graphite.
I'm sorry I worded that part badly. I agree that erasing is very different and the only time I really "smudge" my colored pencil is when I'm not careful about where I lay my hand. ;)

Not meaning to be argumentitive, but if I'm doing a work in Pointilism, I wouldn't be planning on blending.

Again, I have obviously used the incorrect term when I said "shiny". It's true that you can give the appearance of a shiny surface (or dull surface, or any surface you like) with any of the techniques if you put in the right values. I'm not sure what the right wording would be to say that burnishing (putting your pencil on heavy enough to flatten the tooth of the paper) will give that area a glossier look than scumbling.

The "impossibly tedious" comment about the blender pencil may just be my own view... sorry again! I've simply found easier, quicker ways to blend large areas of color.

I just love using erasers to blend. Of course, it's all a matter of what you've experimented with and enjoy doing.

I hadn't seen a demo of using tortillians or towels to blend any cps other than Col Erase. If you or LeAnne would like to show us how to do it, that would be great!
Karen \, Thank you very much. You did just fine. I knew exactly what you ment. If it is one thing I have learned over the years taking art lessons, there is no right or wrong way. If it works for you and you like then there you are!I love the advice and tips. Keep em coming.Someday I will get "off Cape" and get up to Boston and get some Stonhenge. The Rising Mill as it is called is in the village of Housationc,in the town of Great Barrington Ma.where I used to live. Got to find somebody who works in this Mill and get some of the rejects. Maybe they have a factory store. Hmmmm I think I'll stop by when I got home next time. I will also take a pic of the old mill and paint it. It is a very pretty spot.Thanks again,Peg Lattinville

twillard
03-17-2004, 08:01 AM
Interesting thread....

LeAnn... I have a kazillion stumps laying around and have never thought to use them with CP. Do you use them through all stages of your work or wait until the end when you feel you have all of the necessary color applied?

Traci

GenineAnn
03-17-2004, 08:15 AM
Ahhh, Good question Traci! Also, if you use the eraser are you able to add additional layers of colored pencil on top of the blended/burnished areas? And if so, can you continue to add a significant amount of layers or is it more like the burnished areas where only a layer or two more will "stick"??

Been following this thread with interest but I may have missed some of the answers so if I'm repeating some of the questions...sorry.

Thanks

Karen Cardinal
03-17-2004, 09:32 AM
Kelly, You are correct... the dyed color doesn't make any difference. It's simply a decorative thing to make them look like crayons. I'd be happy to send you some. Just pm me with your information so I'll know where they're going. :D

Peg, Thank you for your compliment! It is interesting to see from the responses that we are all saying the same definition for the terms. It's the methods we use to get to it that vary so widely... which is so much fun! Lucky you, going to the factory store... I think I'm jealous! :D btw, when you take some pics of the old mill don't forget your poor artists friends here who'd love to see some of your shots. ;)

Traci, I'm so glad you like the thread! I'm sure LeAnne will be along to answer your question about working with stumps. I'm afraid I don't know enough about it to help. :(

Genine, My method for working with erasers... I lay down my initial layers of color (less than a dozen) and blend them enough to soften the image. Then I lay down another series of layers and blend them with the eraser. I continue to do this layer - blend, layer - blend thing until I've either filled the tooth of my paper or until I'm satisfied with the way the image looks. The only time I actually burnish (where I end up flattening the tooth of the paper and give that area of the paper a "glossier" look) is if I want to emphasise an area (usually a highlight). I always do that on the final layer.
In my experience crayon erasers aren't the best "burnishing" tools bacause they work by pushing the colors around and into each other while lifting small amounts of the color. (You could also say they smudge the colors) When I've worked with the erasers, the areas I've blended don't end up glossy. Of course, if someone wants to burnish with an eraser, I'm sure they could figure out how to. :D

larsnip
03-17-2004, 09:47 AM
Hey Dave. The colorless blending pencils are actually just wax or oil base without any pigment added to it. It doesn't dilute or frost the color like white or a similar light color.

I don't understand how they couldn't dilute the color, don't they add Neutral Material to the pigment? I know I haven't even tryed them, but it seems to me if you put down pure pigment on the paper then added colorless wax or oil, it would dilute it.

DL

arlene
03-17-2004, 09:54 AM
I don't understand how they couldn't dilute the color, don't they add Neutral Material to the pigment? I know I haven't even tryed them, but it seems to me if you put down pure pigment on the paper then added colorless wax or oil, it would dilute it.

DL

nope, it just blends the color together and actually pulls it all together...i used the colorless blender pencil on all of When Time Stopped. After I'm done, I lightly wiped with a cotton makeup pad and then sprayed...

i've found it makes the color richer because it helps fill in the white of the paper.

bearded bob
03-17-2004, 10:01 AM
Dave, yes some wax is added, but it does not dilute the colour. In fact it seems to intensify it somehow, like when you put water onto w-sol pencils. I think the pigment that is there is spread a bit and fills in the white - so you are seeing more pure pigment, less white paper.

As for what Karen is doing with the erasers - well its not burnishing as I know it, so I suppose its a form of blending? I suspect it takes some of the paper surface away each time, but may even lift some more tooth - roughen the surface - and will not tend to flatten it, so what tooth is left will still grip?

From the Brit, who does not rile easily - terribly Un-British, don't you know. :p

larsnip
03-17-2004, 10:08 AM
Ok, :D I stand corrected, I will have to go out and buy some today. Are the Pismas Good?


Dave Larson

bmac
03-17-2004, 10:23 AM
What type of spray do you put on your drawing when through? A workable fixative? or as someone said somewhere(?) a spray varnish? I have used fixative before but not varnish on a drawing. What do you guys use?

pinkrybns
03-17-2004, 10:46 AM
From the Brit, who does not rile easily - terribly Un-British, don't you know. :p

Heeheeheeeee this makes me smile ... grin even :D

And I agree with the rest of what you posted Bob (not that my agreement means a whole lot...hahaha)

Ok, I stand corrected, I will have to go out and buy some today. Are the Pismas Good?

Yep they're good, especially if you are using Prismacolors. I've also used it to blend the Polychromos( but I only use a few colors in the Polys).

Lyra also make a blender pencil, but it's for the oil based pencils. In my infancy, I tried it on some Prismas/Karismas and ended up with a lovely fog! :eek: that'll teach me!!! :p

What type of spray do you put on your drawing when through? A workable fixative? or as someone said somewhere(?) a spray varnish? I have used fixative before but not varnish on a drawing. What do you guys use?

I use a matte finish workable fixative - I use it lightly during the drawing process for more layering and also as a final spray for protection. Varnishing?...hmm I don't know about that, I don't see the need for a varnish if the final coats of workable fix are enough and you matt and frame the piece.
I won't tell you the brandname of my fixative because it would mean nothing to you as it's a Swiss company and probably not readily available in the states.... I'll let someone on your side of the pond respond with a brand name...although I do believe all of this info is in the HOF ;) ;) ;)

~Judy

Elankat
03-17-2004, 11:31 AM
Interesting thread....

LeAnn... I have a kazillion stumps laying around and have never thought to use them with CP. Do you use them through all stages of your work or wait until the end when you feel you have all of the necessary color applied?

Traci

Well, do you want the "right" answer or what I do? :D ;)

You should use a stump for burnishing just as you would a colorless pencil blender. Burnishing with a stump will make the piece slick and glossy (unless you use extremely light pressure), so it is best to wait until the very end. That being said, I usually burnish multiple times in my work. I don't recommend it for everyone. It just happens to work well for me.


Karen, I'll probably just order 6 dozen on my own and use the extra for the preschool classes.

Elankat
03-17-2004, 11:40 AM
Thanks LeAnne - I do know what you mean about the different rolls of card, but maybe its a Brit thing, or maybe its just my ignorance, but I have always called both kinds torchons (which is just an Anglicisation of the French tortillon).

LeAnne, if you never use a heavy pressure, then isn't what you do with stumps blending, not burnishing? See what I mean?? It is very confusing! And Gary Greene and other artists mean something totally different by burnishing. On your definition if you lay down a lot of colour, then rub with a cotton bud this is burnishing. I like your definitions though, and I can agree with you that the amount of pressure you use is probably the critical factor. But how do you explain that to a newbie? OK - now you are blending - but Watch Out! Now you are burnishing, you naughty person!!


I don't consider only heavy pressure to be burnishing. Maybe I wasn't very clear with what I said. For me, burnishing simply involves rubbing with a tool, like a pencil, stump, pad, etc. to polish the work, regardless of pressure. To me, "polish" may not mean to a glossy surface either. But that's just my philosophy and certainly isn't the only one.

Regarding torchons...I've never heard that term around here. Ah, language. Isn't it fun? I remember the first time I was told why Brits call little bags that strap around your waist and on top of your derriere "bum bags" and not "fanny packs." :D

pinkrybns
03-17-2004, 11:52 AM
Maybe we should start a new lexicon.
For instance:
If one burnishes and smudges at the same time it could be "smurnishing"? :rolleyes: :D
(pay no attention to me....just having a moment or 2)

Karen Cardinal
03-17-2004, 12:10 PM
If one burnishes and smudges at the same time it could be "smurnishing"?

Yes... and if one tries to scumble and burnish would it be a scurmish? ;)

Ok, my definition for burnishing is flattening the tooth of the paper and giving the paper a "gloss" or "shine". It's doesn't matter what technique you use, just the end product.
My definition is totally different from LeAnnes and that's terrific! We each work in very different ways, so our definitions are subject to our own experiences.
I feel LeAnne and I are both right and no one can convince me differently. :D

It might benefit us to explain what we mean when we use a "term" to avoid confusion because each of us sees these things a little differently than everyone else and it's not just the "newbies" that can get confused. :)

btw: My definition of a "bum bag" or "fanny pack"... That part of my anatomy that I keep trying to excercise off because I enjoy pizza and cookies too much. ;)

Karen Cardinal
03-17-2004, 12:19 PM
As for what Karen is doing with the erasers - well its not burnishing as I know it, so I suppose its a form of blending? I suspect it takes some of the paper surface away each time, but may even lift some more tooth - roughen the surface - and will not tend to flatten it, so what tooth is left will still grip?

Bob, once again your expertese is showing. :D
I had never really thought about what it was I was doing... I just knew it worked for me. Now that I'm forced to think about what my particular technique does (jeez... thinking.... why did I start this thread ;) ), I believe you're right. I'm not always careful about being whisper light when I lay down my colors, but I never feel like I have too much trouble piling the layers on when I want to. (even on Canson paper) Perhaps I am roughing up the surface with the eraser... that makes a lot of sense!

Thank you again for making me seem a whole lot smarter than I really am. :D

billiam
03-17-2004, 01:10 PM
there are several ways to get to a desired point, by somewhat different methods. all said is very educational. last and best is each creates beautiful art. i love looking and reading all the information. one can find several ways to obtain a certain look. a person has several options to try and see which they like the best. computers and wc artist's will revolunise(?) art. knowledge is so easily obtained with the help of each other. bill

bearded bob
03-17-2004, 02:36 PM
I am just off to scurmish my toothless fanny bag ..... sorry, I am getting very silly!! Must have caught it from Judy :p

Thanks for the clarification LeAnne, I understand now. And for us Brits the fanny refers to another part of the anatomy altogether! I remember when Ann Kullberg came over the fun we had with lifts and chips and pants and - divided by a common language!

Bill you are exactly right - who cares what you call it as long as it makes pretty pictures! But it has been fun finding out what the terms mean to everyone. The problem is if are following a step by step in a book or a kit or somewhere, and it tells you to Burnish - you have to ask "Now does that mean burnish like LeAnne does, or like Bob does, or Like Gary Greene does or like Arlene does, or like Karen does?" - cos we all do it different. Which is great!

pinkrybns
03-17-2004, 03:30 PM
I am just off to scurmish my toothless fanny bag ..... sorry, I am getting very silly!! Must have caught it from Judy :p


ROFLMAO!!! I am not touching that with a ten foot pole! OMG!!! LOL :D :D :D I have Brit friends here!!! I know the different uses of the words!!!!............ROFLMAO!!!! LOL

being silly has it's benefits! :D

Meisie
03-17-2004, 04:16 PM
I still remember my first response to a 'fanny' bag! My facial expression must have been priceless.
Then I discovered the fabric store called 'Fanny's Fabrics' hysterical laughter is not the best description for my reaction :D And I'm not even english!!! ;)

I think Karen the reason why Bob puts it so nicely is that scientific background where such things matter. Keep it up Bob, eloquence is wonderful. I lack that big time.

Anybody else rating this thread??

Meisie

Jazz
03-17-2004, 05:04 PM
I am rating it Meisie :clap: ,

Bob and Judy I have been falling about laughing about 'bum bags' and 'fanny Packs', ROFLMAO!!! Big Time!!! thank you so much for your silliness :D :D

And Meisie 'Fanny Fabrics' just has me in stitches!!! hahahahaha (excuse the pun :D )

Ahhhhh language is soooo... entertaining, I think we all forget on this forum sometimes that we are an international group and so definition means everything when explaining what we do and why we do it :) .

This thread is fantastic!! Thank you so much karen for starting it and including a fabulous demo about the eraser (I am sure glad you did not call it a 'rubber' ROFL ;) ).

And Thank you everyone else for sharing your knowledge it is invaluable to me as i am still learning and experimenting .

Finally, thank you to all the newbies like me who have asked such great questions!! :clap:

Much love to all,

I have had such fun reading this thread and learnt alot :)


ALI

twillard
03-17-2004, 06:33 PM
Well, do you want the "right" answer or what I do?

Thanks LeAnne....:)

Anita Orsini
03-19-2004, 10:35 AM
Water
Of course, this only works with watercolor pencils (which I plan to try one day).

This is great info, Karen. This is the only thing I would dispute. I have found that even regular (not watercolor) are soluable to a certian degree. Some more than others. Another great blending tool - your fingers!
Anita

frida
03-19-2004, 10:55 AM
ANITA - please check the Outside the lines, a weekly thread we have to talk about everything...

Anita Orsini
03-19-2004, 11:31 AM
ANITA - please check the Outside the lines, a weekly thread we have to talk about everything...
I'm confused, I thought the topic was blending colored pencil.
Anita

frida
03-19-2004, 11:37 AM
I didn't mean to confuse you, but to say HI! in the other, just in case you were not familiar with the CP forum... :o

You have certainly posted in the right thread!!! :)

Anita Orsini
03-19-2004, 11:40 AM
Thanks! I am fairly new to WC and appreciate it. I thought you were trying to tell me I was off topic. Was thinking maybe I am even more confused by WC than I thought I was!
Anita