PDA

View Full Version : Kimberly-WIP


Newberry
02-28-2005, 12:39 PM
Hello all,

Among painting lots of outdoor landscapes I have started a new major work. It iwll be a lifesize portrait of Kimberly.

I am attempting to make a finished line drawing, I would like to complete it in a way that it is its own art work. It will be used as the composition for the painting.

I plan also to make several pastel color studies. The one here has been done on red paper.

I want to have a very unique color scheme and starting pastel drawing on intense colored paper gets be to look at color in a very fresh way.

Next, I will be making some atmospheric tone studies, charcoal on charcoal rubbed paper, and I will look, actually squint, to get a hiearchy of hightlights and shadows mid-tones.

Once I have all the studies I want I will start the painting and alternate between working from the studies and working live.

Cheers,

Michael

bjs0704
02-28-2005, 08:35 PM
Michael - It's lovely! I really like the unusual color choice for the background. The red has a fantastic effect. I am looking forward to seeing how this develops!

Good luck!

Barb Solomon :cat:

Newberry
05-29-2005, 08:44 AM
Hello all,

These last few months have been devoted to plein air painting, and I recently exhibited over eighty of them in Chattanooga. Before the exhibition I finished the pencil study of Kimberly. Right now I am working on finishing the pastel of her in the same pose...a color study.

I am curious about something I see on Classical: many of you copy either other paintings, photos, or sculptures. I wonder: does this facilitate your life drawing/painting work?

When I was younger (16-19) I did some work from photos and copied a couple of paintings...but I always found the process and results more dull than when I did something from life. Have you had similar experiences?

I guess that is enough questions for now!

Cheers,

Michael

http://www.romanticrealism.net/images/kimgraph.jpg

jo_b
05-29-2005, 10:37 AM
Hi Michael :wave: Nice to meet you!
I checked out your web site, and you have some really beautiful pieces. The sketches on Kimberly are lovely, I will be watching these develope!

I am curious about something I see on Classical: many of you copy either other paintings, photos, or sculptures. I wonder: does this facilitate your life drawing/painting work?
I am not quite sure what you mean by "facilitate" but, the reason I personally "copy" a master's work is to learn their particular methods and palettes. There are certain Master artists who's work I particularly admire, and would like to emulate in my own paintings. Throughout history, people have "studied" the masters. Copying their works and learning to use their techniques. So that they in turn could create their own pieces, hopefully better, armed with the knowledge that they have acquired from their studies. It in no way should replace life drawing/painting. Also, having the luxury of a live model is not always possible, and in this day and age could be impractical. Models can be expensive! and not everyone has access to a school or atlier that would supply the models for them to draw/paint, hence, the use of photos. Personally I feel there are pros and cons to using a live model instead of photos. but that is a discussion for another time.

Welcome to CA forum. Hope to see more of your work!

Jodi

Sam Cree
05-29-2005, 12:44 PM
Thank you for posting that stuff! Very inspiring work.

WV.Artistry
05-29-2005, 02:25 PM
I am curious about something I see on Classical: many of you copy either other paintings, photos, or sculptures. I wonder: does this facilitate your life drawing/painting work?


Yes.

There are some poses and idealistic views of the human form that are really difficult for me to render, but at the same time, these studies hone my skill to "seeing", especially where potential models are concerned. I can render certain poses with these model-types for my idealistic views that take advantage of my strengths.

Example: I have more success drawing/painting rectangular hands with long thumbs, plump fingers, and notably visible color contrasts. This is almost opposite of what my hands are : square palm, short thumb, average fingers, and ruddy with few contrasts.

So I've wondered if mastery isn't complete versatility per se, but the product of perpetually throwing out what doesn't work, until the art that's left is sharpened to precision by this chisel of failure.

It might be a back-as-swards approach, but the studies help me throw out what is unusable for my art. And occasionally, I find better chisels :)

Looking forward to see your progress in this work.

Newberry
05-30-2005, 05:18 AM
Jodi, thank you for your welcome and you kind comments on my work.

Richard wrote: "So I've wondered if mastery isn't complete versatility per se, but the product of perpetually throwing out what doesn't work, until the art that's left is sharpened to precision by this chisel of failure."

A very amusing point and one that I think is genuinely helpful...only keep the good and erase or neutralize everything else! Excellent. But there could be a point where you end up with a white canvas!

Michael

WV.Artistry
05-30-2005, 12:58 PM
.. But there could be a point where you end up with a white canvas!
Michael
In that event, mine would probably be a concoction of lead white, with an asking price of at least $15 million USD. That's only because I'm an emerging artist. It'd have to be kept within reason .. but add time, and the savvy investor would still consider that price a steal :)

.. When I was younger (16-19) I did some work from photos and copied a couple of paintings...but I always found the process and results more dull than when I did something from life. Have you had similar experiences?

Yes.

Plein air painters would probably state something similar, but in plein air speak.

I can't knock photos as a tool, but the art rendered from a photograph is subject to limitations. Add to that, photographs generally are skewed improperly for canvas, and have too many other lies. There are always exceptions, i.e., masters of aperature and lighting and their use of large format cameras.

Even to study a masterpiece has limitations in the sense that most of us don't have access to the actual painting, working from some replica of the original. So what can we truly capture? Then, even to sit in front of the masterpiece, is still without the wealth of information available to the original artist.

What can they ever be called but studies? Replicas of replicas ..

I'm guessing, but I suspect some of this "stuff" overlaps into why the more trained eye can determine renderings from photographs.

Thanks for the w/i/p notes. Looking forward to seeing an update.

rjKing
05-30-2005, 03:22 PM
Hello all,

These last few months have been devoted to plein air painting, and I recently exhibited over eighty of them in Chattanooga. Before the exhibition I finished the pencil study of Kimberly. Right now I am working on finishing the pastel of her in the same pose...a color study.

I am curious about something I see on Classical: many of you copy either other paintings, photos, or sculptures. I wonder: does this facilitate your life drawing/painting work?

When I was younger (16-19) I did some work from photos and copied a couple of paintings...but I always found the process and results more dull than when I did something from life. Have you had similar experiences?

I guess that is enough questions for now!

Cheers,

Michael

http://www.romanticrealism.net/images/kimgraph.jpg


If you want to know our opinions regarding copies, go here. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=269337)

Just love your work.. I'm also particularly fond of your manifesto! :)

Newberry
05-30-2005, 05:52 PM
Thanks Richards,

Cohen, your one hell of a thoughtful guy, thanks for posting your observations about photos and copying.

And RJ, thanks for your compliment...and on the manifesto as well...

Michael

Newberry
05-30-2005, 05:57 PM
RJ, and Oh yes and thanks for the heads up about the other thread...I browsed over it and thought most everyone very reasonable about their objectives.