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Cindy
06-05-2001, 09:39 AM
This weekend I read an excellent book called The Yin/Yang of Painting : A Contemporary Master Reveals the Secrets of Painting Found in Ancient Chinese Philosophy -- by Hongnian Zhang, Lois Woolley.

It described a system of using broken colors and palettes of complimentary colors to create atmosphere. This was new for me since up until now I have just painted straight tube colors.

The results were very exciting. I did 3 projects. I used palettes of only blues and oranges plus white & black ; purples & yellows plus white & black and reds & greens plus white & black.

A whole new world of atmosphere and subtlety opened up.

Has anyone else tried this? What do you think?

TPS
06-05-2001, 11:47 AM
Glad you found something that opens new avenues for you. However, I'd hardly call those ancient secrets. It's a fairly common method. You might also try working with 3-4-5 triads, analogous colors, split complementaries, and other such varieties.

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http://www.artbydj.com

Cindy
06-05-2001, 01:50 PM
TPS - that was only one part of the book; there was lots more. It didn't claim to be new - it was just relating the ancient chinese philosophy to some of the modern painting techniques.

Patrick1
06-05-2001, 08:50 PM
I also recently learned about paining using nothing but two complimens plus white.
And if the compliments are true compliments,
mixing them in proper proportions will give
a pretty good black (with good quality paints that is).
But I found you have to experiment a little to find which colors are true compliments if you want to get black. For example, most reds and greens will mix to browns, therefore not true compliments. But you may want brown. But if you want to mix black, the green should be replaced with a more bluish green or replace the red with
something more like magenta. Experiment.
I have a book about using color and there was a desert landscape painted with nothing but orange, blue and white. It's unbeleivable...looks like many colors were used. And the limited palette gives a very unifying feeling to the picture.

So, as an example, if you choose the proper blue and orange, plus white, you can get the following colors, and more:

-blue
-orange
-white
-black
-browns
-greys
-peach

Pretty amazing considering you started with just three colors.

-Patrick

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* Beer is good. *
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Cindy
06-06-2001, 10:51 AM
Hey Patrick,

I like beer too. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif


It is amazing!!! And then the piece has such an atmospheric quality.

sarkana
06-12-2001, 10:55 AM
my favorite compliments are

napthol red
phthalocyanine (phthalo) green

they blend to make a perfect cold black! and many lovely browns in between. alizarin crimson can also be used as the red in this case, but i like using a warmer red. condensation red works well and so does cad red medium.

but even the compliments rule has its faults!
worst compliments:
hansa yellow
dioxazine purple
zinc white

zinc white is not strong enough to shift these powerful colors around. of all the compliment pairs, purple and yellow are the most likely to produce a uniform lavender mud.


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http://store.yahoo.com/sarkana

Patrick1
06-12-2001, 01:42 PM
Sarkana, instaed of dioxazine purple and
hansa yellow, try dioxazine purple and sap green instead. Sap green is much closer to the true compliment than yellow. With any complimnet pairs, if it makes brown, then this means they aren't exact compliments. Try
making one of the colors a bit more blueish
instead.
But often, you want to make browns rather than greys or black, and in this case you should use compliments that are not perfect compliments.

Patrick

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* Beer is good. *
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Phyllis Rennie
06-15-2001, 09:17 PM
Originally posted by Cindy:
up until now I have just painted straight tube colors.

The results were very exciting. I did 3 projects. I used palettes of only blues and oranges plus white & black ; purples & yellows plus white & black and reds & greens plus white & black.

A whole new world of atmosphere and subtlety opened up.



Did you post any of these?

SanDL
06-16-2001, 01:07 PM
Hi Cindy, I like that idea about restricting the pallette in that way. Can you get any of your pictures uploaded to look at?
Sandy L.

Cindy
06-18-2001, 10:11 PM
I have attached a piece that was done in water soluble oil using only yellows & purples & white.

One true yellow, one warm, one cool
One true purple, one warm, one cool

Mario
06-19-2001, 08:35 AM
Hi Cindy, Atmosphere and Subtlety (can't pronounce it) is a rich result to go for...especially when beginning a painting...that's why we do Imprimaturas in Burnt Sienna and Ultramarine or raw ochre...My teacher, one of the very best in portraits in the country, is always going for 'illusionistic' which is another way to say the same thing...thanks for starting this thread it gave me another way to look at this very necessary quality in oil painting....

mame
06-19-2001, 09:16 AM
Look at Oberschlaker's work in the Critique Forum for a great example of an accomplished use of complimentaries.

SanDL
06-19-2001, 09:39 AM
Hi Cindy, thanks for the picture. Yummy colors!
I am going to make a point of trying to restrict my color palette more often. I get bogged down in issues of local color and I think that if I exercised more restriction that it would paradoxically free me up from being too tight. If that makes any sense. The attached image uses yellow and purples and white and payne's gray.

Cindy
06-19-2001, 01:06 PM
Wonderful piece!

SanDL
06-19-2001, 05:45 PM
Hey Cindy!
Thank You!:)